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Thread: Upsidedown block - how to extract? Help please

  1. #1
    Super Member SueSew's Avatar
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    It's a 10 inch single piece of fussy cut fabric block set on point surrounded by other 10-inch square-in-square blocks right almost in the middle of the quilt center.

    I sewed the rows together and noticed it when I was pressing the quilt center - Curses!

    Is it possible to carefully 'operate' on the quilt to extract that one block, right-side it and then machine sew it back into place? Or should I undo the whole row on both sides and then both sides of the wrongway block?

    It is one of four huge fussy-cut floral blocks.

    Any suggestions appreciated. Thanks much!
    Sue

  2. #2
    Super Member Tinabodina's Avatar
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    I was trying to think of a different way, but I think you need to undo the row. I will watch this to see if others have any ideas. So sorry, we have all done it.

  3. #3
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    Yes, it can be done. Just rip out a couple of inches beyond the block at each seam, put it the right way and resew it back into the row, then resew the rows together. I would pin it carefully and be careful not to stretch where it's on point.

    Good luck!

  4. #4
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    you should be able to take out the one block for correction. you have to be careful, when sewing it back together, to make sure to reconnect all of the surrounding seams.

  5. #5
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    I have operated on a couple of blocks that have been surround by sashing or blocks and it is doable, you just have to know what your doing, so you don re-do it wrong again.

  6. #6
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    It has happened to me and all I did was carefully take the one block out turn it around and put it back in, You will have to unsew afew stitches on all sides of the row but I never found it necessary to take the whole row out.

  7. #7
    MTS
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    Quote Originally Posted by katier825
    Yes, it can be done. Just rip out a couple of inches beyond the block at each seam, put it the right way and resew it back into the row, then resew the rows together. I would pin it carefully and be careful not to stretch where it's on point.

    Good luck!
    :thumbup:
    It's a specialized field of surgery, but block replacement is definitely possible, and almost always successful.
    Work slowly, keep your focus, and the patient will have a complete recovery. :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

  8. #8
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
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    You just got some great advice so get scrubbed and do the surgery!! LOL
    Let us know about it turns out :)
    I've done it more than once! I feel your pain :(

  9. #9
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    .....or, you could just leave it. the Amish regulary mis-place a block in a quilt as they believe only God is perfect. I, on the other hand, have never claimed one of my quilts to be ''perfect'', and would get ready for surgery!! Go slow and the patient should recover nicely!!

    jodi

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by katier825
    Yes, it can be done. Just rip out a couple of inches beyond the block at each seam, put it the right way and resew it back into the row, then resew the rows together. I would pin it carefully and be careful not to stretch where it's on point.

    Good luck!
    Been there, done that, several times.

    Carol J.

  11. #11
    Super Member isnthatodd's Avatar
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    I have a block unstitched and ready to put back in. My problem was that I put the wrong side out, so just need to be careful to put it in correctly this time. :lol:

  12. #12
    Super Member pollyjvan9's Avatar
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    I have also taken out just one block. Not so long ago I posted a picture of a completed top and someone pointed out that one of the 1/2 sq blocks was turned the wrong way. I was so glad she pointed it out and it really wasn't too hard to take out and replace turned the right way. You just have to be very careful of stretching and in your resewing.

  13. #13
    Super Member SueSew's Avatar
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    Thank you all for the advice and encouragement - and sympathy for the pattern-challenged LOL.

    I like the idea of one little mistake hiding in a quilt - I would never have to do it on purpose. But this quilt center is one of those big-print things with only 13 blocks plus the setting triangles.

    I knew I should have gone to the office and gotten a bunch of those arrow 'sign here' stickies but I was soooo sure I could do an on-point quilt without getting up and down mixed up.

    I will take a deep calming breath, and slooowwwwlllly and carefully pull out the stitches without gouging the fabric, re-press, heavily starch the surrounding triangles, pin and sew. Right side out, right side up, I hope.

    Wierdly, once there is a mistake, it sometimes seems to become the source of another mistake, doesn't it?

    Thanks again all :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:

  14. #14
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    :thumbup:
    It's a specialized field of surgery, but block replacement is definitely possible, and almost always successful.
    Work slowly, keep your focus, and the patient will have a complete recovery. :mrgreen: :mrgreen:[/quote]

    Ditto!

  15. #15
    Senior Member neeng's Avatar
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    Totally agree. I've had to do this before!

    Quote Originally Posted by katier825
    Yes, it can be done. Just rip out a couple of inches beyond the block at each seam, put it the right way and resew it back into the row, then resew the rows together. I would pin it carefully and be careful not to stretch where it's on point.

    Good luck!

  16. #16
    Super Member bluteddi's Avatar
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    it is possible.. I've done it TWIC.. on the SAME BLOCK... just ck ur work constantly.. I redid the same block twice after taking it out and putting it right back in the same way it came out.. FRUSTRATION!!! still better than ripping out the entire row!

  17. #17
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    Unfortunately I've had to do the same thing myself. You can extract that single block, reposition, and re-sew. I would suggest that you extend your ripped seams a little further than just the immediate block just to give yourself some wiggle room. I had one quilt that was sandwiched and partially quilted when I noticed one star block had points facing the wrong way! What a pain but was able to fix while everything was still together and continue on my merry way.

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