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Thread: Want To Teach 6 y/o Grandaughter & need Help

  1. #1
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    Want To Teach 6 y/o Grandaughter & need Help

    I just bought a childs Singer sewing machine to teach 6 y/o ( Almost 7 ) grandaughter to sew and not sure what I
    should start her with? What size blocks? Or would strips be better?Any sugestions?Thanks in advance.
    Retta97

  2. #2
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Most of the toy machines are more hassle then fun. Six is not too young to learn to sew on a real machine. I would suggest you let her use your machine. Draw a wide seam line on two 10" squares of her choice of fabric and let her make a pillow. She will enjoy stuffing it as much as sewing it. Put the foot pedal on a box so her feet won't be dangling. If the pillow is wonky, that's just fine. Don't try to make it right. That comes later.
    Got fabric?

  3. #3
    Senior Member shnnn's Avatar
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    My daughter did much better with shorter seams - we did 4" squares successfully after struggling with 10" squares - on the longer seams by the end she would veer way off... and I second the toy machines being a hassle.

  4. #4
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    First decide on what she would like to make. I would suggest a blanket for her doll? I would then lay out a lot of fat quarters and let her choose what she would like for a simple square patch quilt top. Show her how to sew 2 squares together and then another until she has her first row and go from there.

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    Hi, keep it really simple and success-oriented. I was just talking to a co-worker today about my god-daughter's first big quilt. But, first I started her with a fusible applique wall-hanging. It was pretty simple. She's known to iron and use fusible web since she was 4 and she and I constructed a closet for her American girl doll. So, I went from there. she saw a picture in one of my books (I preselected four or five and let her pick one) that was simple fusible. After she picked the fabrics from my stash, she traced the pattern onto the paper of the fusible, then ironed the fusible to the fabric, cut the pieces, placed and ironed them onto the background. Then, she picked the thread (she was 8, think sliver, metallic, and I set the speed on the machine to slowest and stitch to satin, told her what to do and stood back and let her go. She preferred sewing to swimming that day. Since then, she made a double-bed quilt for her bed. I quilted it for her so could "fudge" her not-quite-square into something sort of square. She loves sewing, so I expect your gd will too. Because the goal if fun, not necessarily perfect. If she has fun, she'll want to do more and then, each time, you will help her learn the 1/4" straight seam allowance. Also, let her learn to "unsew" if her seam allowance is really off (say 3/4"). Lily didn't seem to mind this part at all.

  6. #6
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    Oh, yeah, I second what Bellaboo and shnnn said about the toy machine. I have always taught the kids (DD, her friends, my friends, Lily)on my machine. Just slow down the speed til they learn to control the foot pedal. and have fun!!

  7. #7
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
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    Let her make a pillow case for her pillow. She'll love sleeping on it every night. A pillow case has long sides, great for letting her get the hang of a straight stitch. And doing the hem is another nice long straight stitch.
    Bernina 640, Singer 201-3, Singer Centennial 15-91, Tin Lizzie 26" long arm

  8. #8
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by retta97 View Post
    I just bought a childs Singer sewing machine to teach 6 y/o ( Almost 7 ) grandaughter to sew and not sure what I
    should start her with? What size blocks? Or would strips be better?Any sugestions?Thanks in advance.
    the first thing I'd do is put the toy in the toy box and introduce her to YOUR sewing machine.

    Show her a couple patterns using strips and a couple using just squares. Let her chose the design she likes best. She's not going to stay long if the project is something she's not fond of.
    Bad Spellers of the World
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  9. #9
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine- View Post
    Let her make a pillow case for her pillow. She'll love sleeping on it every night. A pillow case has long sides, great for letting her get the hang of a straight stitch. And doing the hem is another nice long straight stitch.
    good point------------a pillowcase of fabric she's chosen would be a great place to start.
    Bad Spellers of the World
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  10. #10
    Power Poster alikat110's Avatar
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    i am using a book called The best of Sewing Machine Fun for Kids. it is a great book to get started. printed by Possibilities Phone: 303-740-6206 or you can visit my favorite book site...see link below...

    http://www.betterworldbooks.com/best...571202543.aspx

  11. #11
    Super Member Pat625's Avatar
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    I agree on using a real machine! My mother put phone books under the pedal so I could reach it and taught me on her machine when I was 5..I started with very simple pillows, and such till I learned to control the machine. My first quilt was large squares sewn together...very simple and success related...I have been hooked on sewing since

  12. #12
    Super Member maryb119's Avatar
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    To let my DGD learn to run my machine, I drew lines on paper and untreaded the machine and let her stitch on the paper following the lines. She learned to pivot on the corners and to go around curves before we got to fabric. Then I started her on a can coozie and a pillowcase. I drew lines on the fabric and she stitched them until she learned to follow the guide on the thrat plate for seam allowances. We made a small doll quilt too. Pillows for the bed are good practice and boxer shorts or pajama pants are too. There are lots of beginning projects for a young sewer to learn on.

  13. #13
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    my grandaughter has just turned 8 and I bought her a mini sized sewing machine she keeps it at her home and uses when she is sewing on her own, it has a good guard around the needle, when she is at mine she uses my machine with the foot pedal on a box and speed turned down low. I just let her decide what she would like to make, first thing was a slipper bag for a friend at school, then she wanted a pin cushion and she made a cushion for her mum for mothers day. Next project is a skirt for her little sister. I usually cut out for her and iron and she does the rest. She is left handed so have had problems finding suitable scissors. I find if I let her follow her own ideas she is really involved. I am sure your grandaughter will enjoy her time with you.

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