Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 38

Thread: Water Soluble Thread??

  1. #1
    Junior Member Anne Marie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Was Kansas ,now Australia
    Posts
    136
    I'm a very new quilter.This may be a stupid question but I have seen mentioned the use of water soluble thread and I don't understand when or why you would quilt with it. If it dissolves what is the purpose?
    Anne Marie

  2. #2
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,079
    Blog Entries
    1
    It is great to use for basting quilts or other items, you don't have to pick it out, it dissolves when you wash the item.

  3. #3
    Super Member Butterflyspain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Torrox, Andalucia, Southern Spain
    Posts
    9,532
    Was just about to tell you its for basting or trapunto anything that is just a temporary use so you dont have to sit and unpick it, just wash it away.

  4. #4
    Junior Member mtnmama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mountains of Virginia
    Posts
    165
    There are several ways to "sandwich" your quilt top, batting and backing. Some quilters use fusible batting, (I only use this for small items), most people will use safety pins to hold the layers together while it is being quilted. Another way is basting the layers with thread then later pulling out the basting thread after it has been quilted. Thus the water soluble thread, after your quilt has been quilted, you wash it and the basting thread is gone. HAPPY QUILTING!

  5. #5
    Junior Member Anne Marie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Was Kansas ,now Australia
    Posts
    136
    Oh, some instructions seem to have you quilt (stitch in the ditch) the entire quilt - is that necessary?

  6. #6
    Junior Member Anne Marie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Was Kansas ,now Australia
    Posts
    136
    Thanks. I am building up my confidence to quilt my first top. I think I will pin AND baste and there is any other way to secure the layers I will probably try that too. Cross your fingers for me.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,952
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Anne Marie
    Oh, some instructions seem to have you quilt (stitch in the ditch) the entire quilt - is that necessary?
    How far apart the quilting lines need to be is determined primarily by the type of batting you use. Some batting is stable with quilting stitches 10 inches apart; other batting needs quilting stitches 2 inches apart in order to remain stable through many washings.

  8. #8
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    10,434
    Quote Originally Posted by Anne Marie
    Oh, some instructions seem to have you quilt (stitch in the ditch) the entire quilt - is that necessary?
    Harriet Hargrave and Diane Gaudinski both recommending QID to help stabalize the quilt for FMQ. I think it helps a lot. You don't have QID on every seam but it is a good idea to at least do it around the blocks for FMQ on domestic machines. I found the quilts much easier to handle for additional FMQ once they have been stabalized with QID.

  9. #9
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    15,687
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Anne Marie
    Oh, some instructions seem to have you quilt (stitch in the ditch) the entire quilt - is that necessary?
    So far, I am not able to do Free-motion Quilting yet so all of my quilts are Stitch-in-the ditch. I like the look of the straight lines being quilted - sometimes a diagonal across. However, as someone already pointed out, the batting tells you how far apart it NEEDS to be quilted. I use Warm and Natural because it allows a larger open space. Sometimes, I combine SID with tied centers.

    I remember when I tried the water soluble thread on a trapunto: I had trouble getting the needle threaded. OK - what do we do when we can't thread a needle? WE LICK THE THREAD. Not such a smart idea when using the water soluble. hahahahaha.

  10. #10
    Junior Member Anne Marie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Was Kansas ,now Australia
    Posts
    136
    LOL - I'll try to remember that.

  11. #11
    Super Member magpie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    2,083
    Too funny, I would have done the same thing. Now I know better, thanks for the tip.

  12. #12
    Senior Member crashnquilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Lebanon, Missouri
    Posts
    607
    Water soluable thread can also be used in garments and swimming suits to deter your "friends" from borrowing.

    Just a thought

  13. #13
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Merced, CA
    Posts
    4,229
    Blog Entries
    1
    I remember when I tried the water soluble thread on a trapunto: I had trouble getting the needle threaded. OK - what do we do when we can't thread a needle? WE LICK THE THREAD. Not such a smart idea when using the water soluble.
    -----------------
    My eyes have grown old with me, so when threading sewing machine needles, I put a little bit of white paper behind the needle and instantly i can see the hole. Also good is a touch of White-out on it, that is more permanent.

    That works best for me.

  14. #14
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Glenmoore, PA
    Posts
    7,766
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Ramona Byrd
    I remember when I tried the water soluble thread on a trapunto: I had trouble getting the needle threaded. OK - what do we do when we can't thread a needle? WE LICK THE THREAD. Not such a smart idea when using the water soluble.
    -----------------
    My eyes have grown old with me, so when threading sewing machine needles, I put a little bit of white paper behind the needle and instantly i can see the hole. Also good is a touch of White-out on it, that is more permanent.

    That works best for me.
    I solved all of that by buying a machine that has a built-in needle threader; also cuts the thread at the end. Of course the machine was a little pricey, but for me it was well worth it. Now all my Vikings are built-in threading and auto cutters. When I have to thread my serger or my hemmer I miss the feature; keep a magnifying glass handy.

  15. #15
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,656
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by MadQuilter
    I remember when I tried the water soluble thread on a trapunto: I had trouble getting the needle threaded. OK - what do we do when we can't thread a needle? WE LICK THE THREAD. Not such a smart idea when using the water soluble. hahahahaha.
    :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

  16. #16
    Super Member clem55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Lexington,Kentucky
    Posts
    6,198
    Blog Entries
    6
    I use the white paper trick too. My problem is not being able to see the thread too. And my son and my grandson both are wanting me to make curtains for their new houses. UGH!!!

  17. #17
    Super Member annette1952's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Harrison, MI
    Posts
    8,506
    So funny Martina! We have such a habit of that don't we? I have never used the water soluble thread before but I can see me doing the same thing. Thanks for the chuckle!


    Quote Originally Posted by MadQuilter
    Quote Originally Posted by Anne Marie
    Oh, some instructions seem to have you quilt (stitch in the ditch) the entire quilt - is that necessary?
    So far, I am not able to do Free-motion Quilting yet so all of my quilts are Stitch-in-the ditch. I like the look of the straight lines being quilted - sometimes a diagonal across. However, as someone already pointed out, the batting tells you how far apart it NEEDS to be quilted. I use Warm and Natural because it allows a larger open space. Sometimes, I combine SID with tied centers.

    I remember when I tried the water soluble thread on a trapunto: I had trouble getting the needle threaded. OK - what do we do when we can't thread a needle? WE LICK THE THREAD. Not such a smart idea when using the water soluble. hahahahaha.

  18. #18
    Junior Member mardilee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Pentwater, MI
    Posts
    119
    I saw a gal do a demo using water soluble thread. She used it to do something called Madiera applique. She stiched a heart shape of main fabric to lining fabric. Leaving a little unstitched area, she turned it inside out (right side out) and steam ironed it. The thread dissolved. She was left with a heart with turned edges which she then appliqued onto a jacket. It looked very nice.

  19. #19
    Super Member grma33's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Southern Ontario Canada
    Posts
    1,433
    They are using this also for fringe embroidery designs.
    There is a viedo on Embroiderylibrary showing you how to do a fringe on a lions main.vry cool.
    Gale

  20. #20
    Super Member Babs194068's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    5,316
    I am working on a TNT quilt and had to get water soluble thread to hold the pleats in place until the quilt is done.

  21. #21
    Super Member OmaForFour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    1,385
    Blog Entries
    4
    Is that an Airedale I see in your picture?!

    Quote Originally Posted by Anne Marie
    I'm a very new quilter.This may be a stupid question but I have seen mentioned the use of water soluble thread and I don't understand when or why you would quilt with it. If it dissolves what is the purpose?
    Anne Marie

  22. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Dunwoody, GA
    Posts
    118
    Just be VERY careful not to get your solible thread and regular mixed up. I attended a class held by a national quilt teacher and she told how she'd forgotten to change out the thread on the machine and pieced an entire quilt with the water solible. Guess what happened. Oh, MY.

  23. #23
    Junior Member Anne Marie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Was Kansas ,now Australia
    Posts
    136
    YES!!! We love our Airedales. I see you have one too.

  24. #24
    Super Member hobo2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Boonsboro, MD
    Posts
    2,721
    Blog Entries
    1
    A lady locally makes "Just married" gifts. Shorts for the guy, bikini & short top for the gal in flimsy see thru nylon sewn with water soluble thread and two water guns. She sells lots of them.

  25. #25
    Junior Member Anne Marie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Was Kansas ,now Australia
    Posts
    136
    That is too funny. I don't think I'll try that just yet.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.