Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Wavey borders

  1. #1
    Super Member grandma Janice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,226
    Blog Entries
    1
    I need some input. this is the first time I have pulled such a boner. I was setting some blocks on point and on the sides and top and bottom I had to set in some half square triangles. I cut the triangles the wrong way which put the sides of the quilt on the bias. I don't know why I didn't notice it right off but I didn't and by the time I did, I was too far along to tear it all out not to mention I didn't have more material. thinking I could go ahead being careful, I completed the quilt. needless to say the borders are wavey. I hand quilt so it might be easier correcting it as I quilt than If I were machine quilting. does anyone have any advice that would help me?

    I don't have a camara so I can't post picture but when my daughter comes I might be able to. I just need to get on with the quilting.

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,301
    How discouraging that must be - have you tried steaming the sides really well? Lay out the quilt flat so that you can hand press the wavey parts as flat as you can make them, then steam them really well and when cool enough for you to touch, hand press them again to get it really flat and even. then you can put a strip of painter's tape on the flattened fabric just inside the edge...far enough inside so that you can do a hand basting stitch around the edge of the fabric to keep it flat and even. When the hand basting is done in each area you can then gently remove the painter's tape and move on to another section of the quilt. Move around the quilt a you do this to get all of the edge done. The hand basting on the edge will hold it in place until you're done with the quilting and ready for the binding...

  3. #3
    Super Member quiltingfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    San Antonio Texas
    Posts
    1,042
    Blog Entries
    1
    That is a good question and thread. I had the same problem with my last quilt. i still do not think how I am cutting my blocks out. Just finished cutting some triangles for my quilt also hope I do not have this problem, since I have no idea if I cut on the bias or not.

  4. #4
    quilter rkc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    172
    I am going to press and hand baste the edges of my next quilt. Because I hand quilt in a hoop, I find the borders do stretch after all the handling. Tape ... I never thought of that. Good idea..I would also try heavily starching the triangles. Maybe that would control the bias some more.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    West of Cleveland
    Posts
    515
    If the quilt would work with another border on the outside of the setting triangles, you could square up the quilt with the outer border by easing some of the fullness. You would then have to pretty heavily quilt that portion of the quilt so as not to see a puffy area in the stretched part.

  6. #6
    Pam
    Pam is offline
    Super Member Pam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Southern Illinois
    Posts
    3,713
    I would also try to add something to the outside, even if it is a flange, or piping to help get the waves under control.. You could ease the fullness into the next round of fabric, before quilting.

  7. #7
    Super Member grandma Janice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,226
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingfan
    That is a good question and thread. I had the same problem with my last quilt. i still do not think how I am cutting my blocks out. Just finished cutting some triangles for my quilt also hope I do not have this problem, since I have no idea if I cut on the bias or not.
    normally the diagonal edge of a triangle is on the Bias and the two sides are firm. however these set in triangles have the diagonal on the side of the quilt . always the outer sides of a quilt needs to be on the straight of the material. I should have taken the thing all apart and used some other material. Alas, I now have to find a way to work around it.

  8. #8
    Super Member grandma Janice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,226
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks for the idea of the painters tape. I have never had reason to try it before but sounds like a good plan to me. I also quilt on a stand up oval hoop so there is a lot of pulling on the material. I think I will do the heavy basting thing and maybe it will work. you can sometimes quilt out a problem, maybe this will work. Learned on thing, never go on with a mistake, it will only get worse.

  9. #9
    Super Member weezie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Douglas County, GA
    Posts
    1,717
    If you decide to remove the border, measure the space each of the triangles SHOULD take up (if they were not stretched out of shape), mark the space and fit the triangles' bias edges into the corrected space (divide triangle edges & pin), and re-sew with the triangles on the bottom. I have done this and it worked well for me, but I did it the first time I put the border on ... in other words, I never had to remove it and re-sew it.

    Is this clear as mud?

  10. #10
    Senior Member Hinterland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    945
    I had the same problem with a bear paw quilt set on point - the setting triangles had the bias on the outside, and the outer border waved like lettuce. I didn't understand what was going on, and I didn't measure the outer borders through the center - I just sewed and cut them to the right length.

    Once I started quilting I realized I had a problem. I ended up making tucks in the border. Since I was hand quilting straight lines across the border, I handquilted the tucks down.

    At the time I was devastated - the quilt was supposed to be for my sister-in-law, but I thought it was flawed and ruined forever, so I kept it. Now, I can hardly find the tucks! It helps that the border fabric was solid white, and the quilting thread was white to match.

    You could try stay stitching the bias triangles, then reattaching the borders, taking the measurements through the center of the quilt. If you don't want to take the quilt apart, try basting the outer edge and see if that helps with the extra fullness.

    I hope it works out for you.

    Janet

  11. #11
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Idaho Falls
    Posts
    1,908
    Quote Originally Posted by TexasGranny
    I am going to press and hand baste the edges of my next quilt. Because I hand quilt in a hoop, I find the borders do stretch after all the handling. Tape ... I never thought of that. Good idea..I would also try heavily starching the triangles. Maybe that would control the bias some more.
    Here is a handy trick that might help you out. When you finish quilting and before you get your binding on, sew a ribbon, the kind that is only 1/8-inch wide, and sew it down the edge of your quilt. Like the borders, you need to measure through the center of the quilt to get the proper length and width for the ribbon. Once you sew it on, simply add your binding as usual. The ribbon, because it was sewed to the edge and is only 1/8-inch wide, will be completely covered by the binding and no one but you will know it is there. I'm not quite sure why but it really helps to keep a quilt from waving at us.

    I know when I am piecing, often I will starch my fabrics pretty good and that usually keeps any of the units that are on bias from stretching. Things like diamonds almost always get starched to death and I haven't had too many problems.

  12. #12
    reach for the stars 2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    ILL.
    Posts
    3,568
    Working with triangles is tough try to keep the outside edge on the straight grain of fab, If can't try very hard not to stretch the fab when working with it,even blocks can get out of shape quickly if tris. stretch.

  13. #13
    Super Member grandma Janice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,226
    Blog Entries
    1
    thanks guys. I have the quilt on the quilting hoop now and I think I got most of the waves out. will try to post it after I'm finished.

  14. #14
    Senior Member renee765's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    955
    [/quote]
    Here is a handy trick that might help you out. When you finish quilting and before you get your binding on, sew a ribbon, the kind that is only 1/8-inch wide, and sew it down the edge of your quilt. Like the borders, you need to measure through the center of the quilt to get the proper length and width for the ribbon. Once you sew it on, simply add your binding as usual. The ribbon, because it was sewed to the edge and is only 1/8-inch wide, will be completely covered by the binding and no one but you will know it is there. I'm not quite sure why but it really helps to keep a quilt from waving at us.[/quote]

    That's a unique trick that I have never heard of before, but makes perfect sense when you describe it. Thanks for sharing that!

  15. #15
    Senior Member renee765's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    955
    Tiffany said:[/quote]
    Here is a handy trick that might help you out. When you finish quilting and before you get your binding on, sew a ribbon, the kind that is only 1/8-inch wide, and sew it down the edge of your quilt. Like the borders, you need to measure through the center of the quilt to get the proper length and width for the ribbon. Once you sew it on, simply add your binding as usual. The ribbon, because it was sewed to the edge and is only 1/8-inch wide, will be completely covered by the binding and no one but you will know it is there. I'm not quite sure why but it really helps to keep a quilt from waving at us.[/quote]

    That's a unique trick that I have never heard of before, but makes perfect sense when you describe it. Thanks for sharing that![/quote]

  16. #16
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    7,302
    Blog Entries
    1
    Sharon Schamber, an award winning quilter has a video (actually 2) that may help. She explains that starch actually helps shrink the cotton fibers and you can eliminate some waves. Then you can secure it with the tape and base to hold until it is quilted. Here is a link to the video. Good luck.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6aplw_tVZc

  17. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    132
    When cutting triangles from a square if you cut once from corner to corner the long side is a bias. If you cut twice from corner to corner the 2 inside cuts are bias and the outside is a straight grain. When I teach I tell my students to put a pin or some kind of mark on the straight of grain edge so they know which is the straight of grain when putting pieces together.

    I know this won't help current problem but it may save frustration in the future.

    Longarm

  18. #18
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Idaho Falls
    Posts
    1,908
    Quote Originally Posted by Longarm
    When cutting triangles from a square if you cut once from corner to corner the long side is a bias. If you cut twice from corner to corner the 2 inside cuts are bias and the outside is a straight grain. When I teach I tell my students to put a pin or some kind of mark on the straight of grain edge so they know which is the straight of grain when putting pieces together.

    I know this won't help current problem but it may save frustration in the future.
    Longarm
    Now that is a smart little tip! I'm going to keep a chalk pencil at my cutting station just for this. Thank you!

    I know one way to avoid wavey borders is to never just slap the fabric on and start sewing. It's important to measure through the center of the quilt to get an accurate measure of the true size of the top. Measure the width through the center and cut out the borders to match these measurements exactly. Then pin the border to the quilt. Pinning may not seem important but it keeps the feed dogs from shifting the fabric, which is a great way to end up with puckers or a wave. If you first pin the edges, then match up the centers and pin that, then you can begin to pin the rest of the border to the quilt top. This way if you need to ease or stretch the fabric at all, you'll be able to do it across the entire quilt evenly, again so that no one area puckers or waves. Once your side or top and bottom borders are on, simple measure through the quilt top again for the correct measurement and cut out the last two borders to fit. Pin, sew, and enjoy borders that don't wave all the time.

    Hope that makes sense and helps someone.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.