Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 68

Thread: Weird experience with starch. Is this normal??

  1. #26
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,115
    I don't use starch, I use sizing and very infrequently.......I'm sorry, but I just don't see the reason to "starch til it's like cardboard" in order to piece a quilt. I haven't starched anything since dh had to wear white shirts to work daily and they were all cotton...well, take that back, I have a few doilies that I have inherited, and when they are washed I will then starch them til they are like cardboard!!!!

  2. #27
    Super Member LindaR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,943
    Blog Entries
    1
    you don't have to saturate with best press and don't use too much..it give just a light stiffening. I use a product for heavy starching from Niagra that is in a spray bottle. you can find it at Walmart for 1.87 and doesn't flake. I am a big fan of starch also, use it alot before cutting out applique pieces...

  3. #28
    Senior Member Selena's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Southern MS
    Posts
    606
    I just use heavy starch in the spray can, 99 cents at WalMart. I starch whole pieces of fabric before cutting and it's awesome. I use it on some quilt tops before loading onto the LA if they aren't pressed.

  4. #29
    Member fudge and furs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    90
    So far my most favorite spray starch is Niagara Non Aerosol Spray Starch. Has a very fine pump spray, biodegradable, leaves no flakes. I spray, let it sit for a couple of minutes to soak in, dry iron, not too hot. I found this at a Family Dollar store for $2.00. Probably in other stores for F.D. is the closest to me. Wash fabric first, No softener, EVER.

  5. #30
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    [quote=Yooper32]
    Quote Originally Posted by ploverwi2
    Lucky you. I have checked at the only 3 WalMarts that are in the area and cannot find that non-aerosol in any of them. Have been looking for about three months now. They do carry a Wrinkle Realeaser that is something over $6 a spray bottle,so I am thinking this is not what everyone has talked about. I think they were saying the Faultless non-aerosol was about $1.89 or thereabouts.
    The walmart here has two brand of the non aerosol, Faultless and Niagara. It's in different parts of the store. In the laundry aisle in the food section, in the ironing board/iron aisle, and I found it where the laundry baskets were. All the Walmart warehouses have it, have the manager of the dept to order it. Here the laundry dept manager, the ironing board dept manager and the plasticware manager don't know the others are ordering it. LOL.

  6. #31
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Paris, Texas
    Posts
    173
    I personally never starch. Even IF I prewash fabric I do not starch. Even fabric from WalMart and Joann's have starch in them. You are washing the starch out and then putting starch back on it. The only time I prewash is if the fabric is black or red. And you can prewash a swatch to see if the fabric is going to run. I also prewash my batiks, but I use a Shout color catcher which works great. I still do not starch the batiks. I know I am going against what many of you do, but I don't want to do more work than I have to.

  7. #32
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Michigan. . .FINALLY!!!!
    Posts
    6,916
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Donna Hall
    I personally never starch. Even IF I prewash fabric I do not starch. Even fabric from WalMart and Joann's have starch in them. You are washing the starch out and then putting starch back on it. The only time I prewash is if the fabric is black or red. And you can prewash a swatch to see if the fabric is going to run. I also prewash my batiks, but I use a Shout color catcher which works great. I still do not starch the batiks. I know I am going against what many of you do, but I don't want to do more work than I have to.
    Pre washing doesn't just remove the starch. It also removes the chemicals used in manufacturing of the fabric. These chemicals can be very irritating to some people and cause allergic reactions in others. So, if I wash out the starch that the manufacturer puts into fabric and then I re-starch my fabric before I use it, it is a small price to pay to keep my skin from turning red, blistering, scaling and itching like crazy. I always and will continue to prewash. There are so many chemicals in our environment today that when there is a chance to reduce our exposure, then it is well worth the effort.

  8. #33
    Senior Member Landers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Lincoln CA
    Posts
    651
    You may be using too much. I tried that brand and ended up with sticky stuff on my iron. I probably was using too much. Now I just use Sizing spray and not Spray Starch.

  9. #34
    Super Member grammysharon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Monmouth, Oregon
    Posts
    5,841
    Blog Entries
    1
    It should not be "wet" just misted. I think you used too much. :lol: :D :lol:

  10. #35
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,502
    did you use steam in your iron when you were doing this ? if so maybe you were getting the fabric to wet

  11. #36
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Delaware County, SW of Phila.
    Posts
    605
    I tried a regular spray starch and found it left a residue on my fabrics; I didn't like it. Switched to Mary Ellen's Best Press and have had no problems. I just shake the bottle; spray and press immediately. It works great. Interesting to see some people wait 5 minutes or more. For me, I get the right results just doing the pressing as soon as I spray. I love using it and think it is worth the little extra it cost.

  12. #37
    Super Member sahm4605's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Blue Springs, MO
    Posts
    2,240
    I do yards and yards at a time they take about a good hour to dry depending on where i dry them. (don't have a large space) It is normal though for them to take a bit of time. When I do yardage I will mix together the amounts in a spray bottle and then put fabric in a large mixing bowl and then dump the spray bottle into the bowl with the fabric. then move fabric and squeeze excess water out.it works real well that way and i always check to make sure it is nice and coated in the starch before hanging to dry.

  13. #38
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Michigan. . .FINALLY!!!!
    Posts
    6,916
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by dcamarote
    I tried a regular spray starch and found it left a residue on my fabrics; I didn't like it. Switched to Mary Ellen's Best Press and have had no problems. I just shake the bottle; spray and press immediately. It works great. Interesting to see some people wait 5 minutes or more. For me, I get the right results just doing the pressing as soon as I spray. I love using it and think it is worth the little extra it cost.
    :thumbup:

  14. #39
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Mars
    Posts
    2,038
    I love Best Press for the fabulous scents - I would buy Caribbean Beach and Cherry Blossom in perfume form, if I could! :)

    But I've found that I prefer liquid starch mixed 50/50 with water in a spray bottle for preparing fabric prior to cutting it.

    I soak the fabric, let it almost dry, then steam press it to dry all the way.

    When you spray unwashed new all-cotton fabric with any liquid, it's going to curl up and shrink to one extent or another. Some of them seem to hardly shrink at all while others look like Shrinky Dinks plastic in the oven!

    What surprised me the most is the difference in shrinkage between the lengthwise and crosswise grain - some of my fabrics have shrunk twice as much along the crosswise as with the lengthwise. What could distortion like that do to your cut and sewn quilt block? :shock:

    That's one of the reasons I starch beforehand - to get that shrinkage done before I cut and sew. (and, lazy me, so I don't have to pre-wash! :) )

  15. #40
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Denman Island, BC Canada
    Posts
    191
    Any Canadians reading? I have searched high and low and cannot find liquid starch in Canada. I even checked the Nova Scotia stores while I was visiting my dd last month!

  16. #41
    Junior Member simplyme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Porter, TX
    Posts
    133
    I use liquid starch and mix with water. That way I can control if i want light or heavy starch. I like to starch all my fabric before cutting. It helps me with cutting and sewing. Also a must if you are doing anything on the bias.

  17. #42
    Senior Member csharp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Happily @ Southwest Florida
    Posts
    836
    Quote Originally Posted by fudge and furs
    So far my most favorite spray starch is Niagara Non Aerosol Spray Starch. Has a very fine pump spray, biodegradable, leaves no flakes. I spray, let it sit for a couple of minutes to soak in, dry iron, not too hot. I found this at a Family Dollar store for $2.00. Probably in other stores for F.D. is the closest to me. Wash fabric first, No softener, EVER.
    Same here, but you can also find it at Dollar General, I'm thinking.

  18. #43
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    The California Hills
    Posts
    626
    Why is the non-aerosol products mentioned here as better?? I have a few of the aerosol spray cans from when I was starching my husbands collars. Are these not as good or cause flaking?

  19. #44
    Junior Member Old hen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    189
    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S
    Best Press is not really starch. If you want something a bit ...stiffer or firmer ... use starch. I am a HUGE fan of starch, didn't find much value in Best Press for the $$ it cost.
    I've always been told that Best Press is a starch alternative. Have you read the thread about making your own spray using water, essence oil, and vodka?

  20. #45
    Super Member Mitch's mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    1,435
    I first bought the Best Press for quilting, however I didn't think it did much in the way of stiffening the fabric. Perhaps it is more of a sizing. I use it when I press my work clothes because they don't wrinkle as badly from the seat belt in the car and I don't end the day looking like an un-made bed.

    My clothes always smell great, which is a bonus! If you run across the blue colored Best Press in the fresh linen scent - treat yourself.

  21. #46
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,703
    That's a neat tip! I use STA-Flo also, but never thought to get it really wet and when steam press it. I will try that next time.

  22. #47

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Sacramento area of Calif
    Posts
    150
    Having never used starch, but thinking about it for a OBW I might someday do - here's my question: Does the starch stabilizes during the piecing process, but then going to the quilting step, does the starch get rinsed out? Or the starch stays until the quilt is done, and in my case, given, then washed out after when recipient so decide? How does that work with charity quilts?

  23. #48
    Super Member Farm Quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Odessa, Washington
    Posts
    1,907
    I wash all my yardage when I bring it home. I hang the yardage over the shower curtain rods since I don't have a clothes line. Right after I hang the material I spray it heavily with starch - Sta-Flo mixed with water - and let it dry. I fold it carefully and don't press the fabric until I am ready to use it. Works great. Easy to press and no white flakes.

  24. #49
    Senior Member connie_1936's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    mesa and payson, arizona
    Posts
    805
    Blog Entries
    3
    starch your fabric before you cut. ironing while still damp will shrink the fabric. also trim off the selvage before starching.

  25. #50
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    11,952
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by muddlingabout
    Having never used starch, but thinking about it for a OBW I might someday do - here's my question: Does the starch stabilizes during the piecing process, but then going to the quilting step, does the starch get rinsed out? Or the starch stays until the quilt is done, and in my case, given, then washed out after when recipient so decide? How does that work with charity quilts?
    Starch stays in the fabric until the finished quilt is washed. However, with all the handling from piecing and quilting, the "starchiness" is pretty much broken down by the time the quilt is finished. I always wash my quilts before giving them away -- not only to get rid of the starch, but also to make sure that nothing is going to bleed (I do the first wash with Synthrapol).

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.