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Thread: What is the best stabilizer for applique??

  1. #1
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    What is the best stabilizer for applique??

    I am new to quilting and I had to go and start out doing two at the same time. Well now I have two that I just put into frames, because they are too stiff to sew. I tried freezer paper and wasn't very good at that. So I bought Heat and bond lite (It says its for applique) Now they are stiff. What would you guys suggest is the best for a newby? I'm pretty upset too because the lighthouse was going to be a x-mas gift.
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  2. #2
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    I see nothing wrong with having those really pretty pictures in a frame. I think they are gorgeous framed.

  3. #3
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    Have you tried a water soluble one? Something that you can wash away after sewing?

    I usually use wonder-under or Steam-a-seam. I use the technique taught in Crafty's Pictorial Quilting class

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    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
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    Also remember they will have some stiffness to them until they are washed - I think the Heat n Bond gets softer as it is washed
    To keep your mind fresh- learn one new thing a day !

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    Super Member pollyjvan9's Avatar
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    I do a lot of fusible, raw edge applique and have always used Wonder Under Lite (or Medium if Hancock's is out of Lite). I have a friend who teaches at a vo-tech here in Oklahoma City and she always used Heat and Bond Lite and has no problem sewing through it. Are you doing hand quilting? If so, even the Wonder Under Lite may be difficult. I don't do any hand work so I don't know. Also, I have used spray baste to hold things in place until I get them stitched down. BTW I love your framed quilts. I do a lot of wall hangings but have never framed them. Going to do that soon. Happy Quilting.

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    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    heat & bond lite washes away- the stiffness goes away once your project is laundered- the no sew heat n bond does not get soft- it stays stiff but heat n bond lite and steam a seam lite both soften right up- also wonder under from pellon is another (one thats been around a long long time) is another sew -able- fusable that softens up - washes away once the project is stitched and laundered. i do alot of fusable applique & use heat n bond lite most of the time-
    also- there is a difference between fusable for raw edge applique & stablizer- stablizers do not (stick) 2 pieces of fabric together- they only adhere to one piece-adding stability- those come in stay in (a light layer of fabric) tear away and wash away varieties- but are used more for embroidery and other sewing applications
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  7. #7
    Super Member Lilrain's Avatar
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    They are both very nice and will be greatly appreciated, I am sure. Heat and Bond is not a stabilizer, but is a fusible. Freezer paper is used when making templates for applique. Stabilizers are usually used behind the foundation when machine appliquing to prevent pucker. So maybe you need to determine what your purpose is in in wanting "stabilizer."

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    Thank you all for replying. I guess I'll do a potholder or something small and try washing it after. I hope it softens up, because I found I am not very good at folding the seams under. Thanks again.
    Also I hope its not considered cheating, but I used oil pastels to give some areas shading??
    Last edited by mldulac; 06-19-2012 at 04:42 PM. Reason: I forgot to say something.

  9. #9
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Soft Shades and Misty Fuse are both products that are made especially for quilters (not crafters) and have been made to give the final product a softer hand. I don't care for any of the Heat and Bond or Steam a Seams. They are still too stiff. I like Misty Fuse much better and still need to try Soft Shades but I've heard very good things about it.

  10. #10
    Super Member kathdavis's Avatar
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    Impressive! You are beyond a beginner already.
    Kathleen

    Remember, people will see your quilts long after you are gone....NOT your housework!

  11. #11
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    If you want a fusible that is not stiff, try Misty Fuse or Shade Fuse. These do not stiffen the fabric; however, you still need to sew over them to make them permanent for regular quilt use.

    Stabilizer is different from fusible. Stabilizer is used underneath the background fabric when sewing an applique by machine -- especially when sewing the applique edges down with a satin stitch.

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    Thanks again everyone, If you ever come to Maine, this is one place you need to see. It is meant to look like a picture I took of Portland Headlight.
    Thanks Candace, I looked Misty Fuse up on line and I am going to give it a try. I'm not happy with the stiffness of Heat n Bond. I would not want a quilt with that feel. It was going to be a sofa throw. Up here in Maine there is not many places left that sell fabrics and sewing stuff! I remember when sewing was cheaper than buying off the shelves. But it is so different now.

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    heat n bond "featherweight" is the lightest with a paper backing..Mistyfuse has no paper, it is just a webbing.

    keeping fabric under glass will cause it to yellow, and rot faster!

  14. #14
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mldulac View Post
    Thanks again everyone, If you ever come to Maine, this is one place you need to see. It is meant to look like a picture I took of Portland Headlight.
    Thanks Candace, I looked Misty Fuse up on line and I am going to give it a try. I'm not happy with the stiffness of Heat n Bond. I would not want a quilt with that feel. It was going to be a sofa throw. Up here in Maine there is not many places left that sell fabrics and sewing stuff! I remember when sewing was cheaper than buying off the shelves. But it is so different now.
    Be sure to try Soft Shades too. I agree with you on not being satisfied with the big box store type fusibles. Even the lightest types aren't light enough. Of course 'windowing' the fusible will help wonders, but when you're dealing with the tiny pieces that overlap you want it light as a feather!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mldulac View Post
    Also I hope its not considered cheating, but I used oil pastels to give some areas shading??
    There is no such thing as cheating. Just test what you are using to color to make sure it can be washed (or make sure to tell the reciepient it can't be.)

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    I like to use a featherweight fusible interfacing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mldulac View Post
    Thank you all for replying. I guess I'll do a potholder or something small and try washing it after. I hope it softens up, because I found I am not very good at folding the seams under. Thanks again.
    Also I hope its not considered cheating, but I used oil pastels to give some areas shading??
    not cheating at all--you created an art quilt. and they are beautiful framed. I don't see why you wouldn't gift them as they are. Your work is gorgeous, IMHO

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    Boy, you are talented! I love your pieces.

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    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mldulac View Post
    Thank you all for replying. I guess I'll do a potholder or something small and try washing it after. I hope it softens up, because I found I am not very good at folding the seams under. Thanks again.
    Also I hope its not considered cheating, but I used oil pastels to give some areas shading??
    When I have to press seams under, to applique, I do it the easy way! You can use the Heat & Bond Lite or if you don't want the fusible, you can use freezer paper. Just trace and cut your shape, from the paper. Place it onto the wrong side of a piece of fabric and press (for freezer paper, put the shiny side against the fabric). Now cut the fabric around the shape, leaving about 1/4" - 3/8" extra. Clip any curved areas, ALMOST to the paper (leave at least a few threads' width, uncut). With the paper side down, CAREFULLY use the tip of your iron, to fold/press the edge of the fabric, over onto the paper. Press well (but do NOT slide the iron around on it!). If you use freezer wrap, peel off the paper, right before you begin stitching. If you use the fusible, just press the entire thing to background fabric, then applique around edges.
    Neesie


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    Super Member Delta's Avatar
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    wonder under. is not as still a heat bond lite. nice job
    SMILE- it will make everyone wonder what you are up to.
    Stay strong and keep looking up.

  21. #21
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    You could stiple and echo quilt in the background around the applique.
    Got fabric?

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    You've all given me good advice. Now I will try some of these to see which works best for me. Thanks again

  23. #23
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Superior threads have a number of videos that could help you and they would have correct terms for you.The companies market them under different brand names here.Try to go for something called misty fuse if you want a softer feel.Some of the badge making ones are very stiff. I find that I mostly use one that is called 'vleisofix'.It is quite useful for a variety of purposes. There is also a fusible thread which you sew around the edge of the applique and then iron onto the background to keep it in place whilst you stitch it in . It means that you don't have it heavily stuck down and it remains soft and pliable.

  24. #24
    Senior Member happyquiltmom's Avatar
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    Heat & Bond is a fusible, not a stabilizer. And, it's not meant for stitching applique. It's for crafty stuff like sweatshirts.

    For stabilizing applique, I just use regular typing paper behind my work and tear it away when finished. I have also used sketch paper, the kind you buy in a pad.

    For fusible applique, I always use Wonder Under. It needles easily and doesn't add stiffness to the quilt. Two important tips for Wonder Under: 1. Always store it rolled up. If you fold it, the "sticky" will separate from the paper, making it virtually useless. A paper towel tube is especially useful for storing Wonder Under.
    2. Be sure that the product is COMPLETELY cool before attempting to peel away the paper. Sometimes I pop the applique into the refrigerator for a few minutes to speed up the process. Always score paper on the back to simplify peeling.

  25. #25
    Super Member justflyingin's Avatar
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    I think the way you combined techniques (applique and adding color with pastels) is great. Beautiful work!

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