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Thread: What did I do wrong? Advice needed please!

  1. #1
    PrettyKitty's Avatar
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    Does anyone know what I have done wrong here to make the wrinkles appear in the border. The pic shows the back only as the wrinkles didn't show up on the front in the pics as it is a busy fabric on the front. I was doing stitch in the ditch on either side of the border, and the wrinkling only appeared while doing the outer edge. As I was sewing it was like there was too much quilt top and not enough backing. As a result on the front there is a few puckers.

    The layers are sandwiched together using basting spray, do you think maybe I didn't use enough on those edges and this caused the layers to shift? This is only the third quilt I have done (all baby size) and have not had this happen before.

    I was using a stitch in the ditch foot at the time.

    Not sure if undoing the stitching and re-doing it would make any difference? My fella says he would never have noticed if I hadn't pointed it out (men!) and that it all looked great anyway (bless him!).

    I think I will chalk this one up to experience but am curious as to what it was I did wrong so I don't do it again! You advice and input would be appreciated as always!
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  2. #2
    Super Member mary quite contrary's Avatar
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    I am by no means an expert but maybe try a walking foot.

  3. #3
    Super Member quiltwoman's Avatar
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    Did you sew the 2 lines in opposite directions? I have had that happen when not using a walking foot--I tended to "pull" my fabric thru the machine.

  4. #4
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    One layer (top/bottom or bottom/top) fed through at a different rate than the other. A walking foot will definitely help.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltwoman
    Did you sew the 2 lines in opposite directions? I have had that happen when not using a walking foot--I tended to "pull" my fabric thru the machine.
    That does seem to make a difference. Even with a walking foot - which minimizes the problem.

  6. #6
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    Hi,

    It happens to all of us. Did you by any chance cut your borders on the cross grain of the fabric? If you did they have just enough stretch in them to allow them to wrinkle as you sew. Even a walking foot might not solve the problem. The reason that garmet patterns have big arrows to indicate the layout as it regards to grain is that the proper hang of a garment depends on how the fabric is cut. Remember that the only place that stretch is a good thing in a quilt is the binding. It was many years before I knew that you don't cut your borders by just sewing them on and cutting off any excess. You have to take an average of the crosswidth of the quilt in several places and cut your cross borders that length. Then you ease the border and the body of the quilt together letting your feed dogs ease in any differences in the two peices. We have all seen quilts that look like the last border is a ruffle. That is what happens when the borders are not cut on the "straight" of the grain. Depending on who will be using your quilt it may not make any difference. A loved one will probably love it no matter how disappointed you are in it's appearance.

    A reputable quilt judge would grade the item down if the borders ripple.
    I have resorted to couching decorative yarn in the ditch of my quilts that had what I considered flaws in points matching etc.

    Unless your quilt is going to be judged by a professional I wouldn't worry about the wrinkles. Just be glad you finished it and didn't just create another UFO.

    Mary

  7. #7
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
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    Pretty, I was thinking the same thing as Mary.. It may be as simple as using a walking foot (if you weren't), but Mary's explanation could be the culprit either way. :cry: I wouldn't get too worried about it on this quilt since your honey said he wouldn't even have noticed it. On the next one I know you will be paying more attention to this in advance and it will probably never happen to you again!! :lol:

  8. #8
    PrettyKitty's Avatar
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    Yes I think I did sew in different directions, must remember not to do that for next time, thanks

  9. #9
    Senior Member Stitching4Fun's Avatar
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    I have to agree with Quiltwoman. I sew for a living and one rule is to sew two lines in different directions to eliminate the pucker. Sometimes it doesn't matter, but why take the chance. I know that I have taken things apart for exactly the puckering reason.

    Barb

  10. #10
    PrettyKitty's Avatar
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    Ok, I have learnt...

    Sew in the same direction

    But I was SO in love with my stitch in the ditch foot, why do they not do one that is a walking foot AND stitch in the ditch?!?! :roll:

  11. #11
    Senior Member Kara's Avatar
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    Things I do to help prevent this.

    Cut borders on the straight of grain. (I understand this is the back of the quilt, so this probably doesn't help this.

    Pin-baste like CRAZY! When you think you have enough - add more. Every 3-4 iches.

    Use a walking foot. BIG help!

    Most importantly, let the machine do a lot of the work (this is where the walking foot helps). No pushing. No pulling. Just assisting to make sure the bulk makes it to where it needs to go. I find when I'm in a hurry (at the borders and the quilt's almost done - nothing like seeing the light at the end of the tunnel and you want to run to it instead of walk...) I start pushing it through and I end up with wrinkles.

    I'm constantly reminding myself to relax during this stage. I get soooo excited that my vision is almost complete....


  12. #12
    cottagelover's Avatar
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    Wow, for me being a new quilter for the past 8 months, you call that a wrinkle? You should see some of my really early wrinkles, and not just on the quilts either...

  13. #13
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    when you add sashing to a quilt you need to measure each side and average the measurement then make it fit don't just sew the border on cause you can stretch it and one side could be longer than the other. I learned that one the hard way. I'm not sure if that is your problem but I know each side's length can very and they need to be the same. Measure the edge while it is laying flat and don't stretch it.

  14. #14
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    I also divided my border in half and marked that point - If I was using 12 inch blocks, I also marked my border in 12 inch increments.

    This improved the odds a little bit.

  15. #15
    Bernadette Harwood's Avatar
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    I agree on the measuring to make sure you are not making the borders too big. But sometimes you don't have your fabric layers stretched and as you pin you are creating tugs. So after you pin, pin, and pin baste. ( Pinning very close is very important)!!!! Turn your quilt over, it still should be fairly flat even with pins and you will see if you have a lot of tucks. if so turn over and fix those tucks now before you quilt. Also I hardly ever use a even feed foot but some people need it. Don't pull or push the fabric let the machine do it for you. I do hold my hands right before and after the fabric at the needle area, just to keep everything flat and spread out. Some machines may need the presser foot pressure to be loosened, especially for a newer quilter. If normally it is on 4 try 3 or 2 1/2. Practice makes better. The more you quilt the better you will get:-) Bernadette

  16. #16
    Super Member Margie's Avatar
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    wait...I am confused...one post said sew two lines in Different directions and the other said I have learned sew in same direction...which is it? not sure I understand. Margie

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