Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 66

Thread: What I Learned About Spray Basting

  1. #1
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    1,211

    What I Learned About Spray Basting

    I tried spray basting yesterday and today. I spread out an old comforter yesterday and sprayed the backing to attach to the batting. I learned it's much easier putting the fabric on the table rather than the floor. I also learned to start in the middle and work out. The fabric is less likely to wrinkle.

    This really beats pinning and hand basting! I hope the quilting goes as well.

  2. #2
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mableton, GA
    Posts
    8,474
    Just curious on how you handle the overspray on the table? I tried spray basting once on my kitchen floor, thought I had spread enough newspapers around, didn't, and had a time getting it up. I'm willing to try again though.

  3. #3
    Senior Member quilter41's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    N Indiana
    Posts
    529
    I do mine on a table DH made for me with saw horses in the garage. The overspray is very hard to remove. Ask me how I know? For smaller quilts it is definitely the way to go.

  4. #4
    Super Member gardnergal970's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Covington, Indiana
    Posts
    1,657
    I use spray basting but do it on my design wall. I put up an old sheet with big saftey pins first and pin up the the back of the quilt, spray, add batting stretched and pinned and finally spray and pin the top on. Each time I spray, I lift the edge of the sheet to catch the overspray. I do use a light application which holds well and clean up is throwing the sheet in the washer. It is so simple and works so well for me.

  5. #5
    Super Member paulswalia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,103
    Blog Entries
    3
    I'm told that Mr. Clean magic erasers take off the overspray like "magic".

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    1,211
    I put a queen size old comforter under it. This quilt is just a wall hanging. If I were doing a larger quilt I would just make sure everything within about 1-2 feet was covered. I think doing it in sections is important and for a larger size quilt doing the sections might be a little time consuming but it still takes less time than the hand basting.

  7. #7
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    7,160
    Blog Entries
    3
    If you hold the can near the edge of the fabric, and aim towards the center of the quilt while working around the edges, you can avoid a lot of overspray. I spray lightly in a grid pattern about 6-8" apart. Works for me!

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Finger Lakes, NY
    Posts
    1,880
    Good advice. I haven't tried it yet but will soon.
    I don't want to brag but I can still fit into the earrings I wore in high school.

  9. #9
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Ridgefield WA
    Posts
    6,401
    Blog Entries
    41
    Love it, but sure was a pain to get off my brass bed!! Now I hook a fitted sheet over the two outside top posts and painters plastics sheets are quite cheap! I, also, do it in sections.
    http://s1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh485/KitsieH/
    Never regret growing older, its a privilege denied to many.
    Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle.

    Kitsie

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    407
    Quote Originally Posted by katier825 View Post
    If you hold the can near the edge of the fabric, and aim towards the center of the quilt while working around the edges, you can avoid a lot of overspray. I spray lightly in a grid pattern about 6-8" apart. Works for me!
    That's what I do too and it works great!

  11. #11
    Senior Member Highmtn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    An Ocean Shore
    Posts
    968
    I've been using spray basting for awhile now. I do NOT use it in the house and so far I only use it on wall hangings, table toppers, table runners and mug rugs. . I hop out the back door with my project on either a nice stiff piece of cardboard or some cheapie foam core board I got at the dollar store. That's just BAD STUFF to inhale...even a LITTLE.

    I've had GREAT LUCK USING IT! I do start from the middle and smooth out. It's amazing how well it holds if you fuss with your project. I have not had anything pull up yet that I didn't intentionally tug off.
    .
    "It's a *fine line* between HOBBY and MENTAL ILLNESS"~ Dave Barry

  12. #12
    Senior Member Earleen's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Michigan--the sunrise side
    Posts
    389
    I got a small tarp and put it over table first then spray, it lays flat enough, catches most of the overspray.
    Earleen The best helping hand is at the end of your arm.

  13. #13
    Super Member donnalynett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,318
    Quote Originally Posted by paulswalia View Post
    I'm told that Mr. Clean magic erasers take off the overspray like "magic".
    It will also take the finish off your table like "magic". Don't ask me how I know.

  14. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Mabank, Texas
    Posts
    8,280
    Thanks everyone for the great hints. I tried spray basting once and made the biggest mess ever. After reading your hints, I think I will give it another go.
    Fabric is like money, no matter how much you have it's never enough.

  15. #15
    Super Member JanTx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Texas Gulf Coast
    Posts
    1,469
    I spray table runners and baby sized quilts. I do this on top of a tall double bed. The old, awful comforter on that bed is perfect, but I do have an old piece of cardboard that I store under the bed and place under the project. I layer backing and batting - then fold the batting back halfway. Spray the backing, smooth down the batting, then do the same for the other side. Then put the top on the batting then fold back halfway, spray half, smooth down, repeat. I also use a short spray
    So many quilts, so little time.

  16. #16
    Senior Member paulettepoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cedar City Utah
    Posts
    815
    I am in love with spray basting. It has completely removed any dread I had of doing the quilting. So much better than pinning or basting with thread.
    Some people visit paradise, I live there.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Manchester, NH
    Posts
    701
    Quote Originally Posted by gardnergal970 View Post
    I use spray basting but do it on my design wall. I put up an old sheet with big saftey pins first and pin up the the back of the quilt, spray, add batting stretched and pinned and finally spray and pin the top on. Each time I spray, I lift the edge of the sheet to catch the overspray. I do use a light application which holds well and clean up is throwing the sheet in the washer. It is so simple and works so well for me.

    I was just ready to suggest using a (or two or three) bed sheet(s) to cover everything around the spraying area, and then just washing them after. I stopped using spray basting because I have COPD, but I am going back to it 'cuz it's so much easier. I'm going to hold a wet face cloth over my nose and mouth, (like they tell you to when in a burning building to keep the smoke at bay) and then I'm going to spray away! Hope it works! If smoke can't get through the wet face cloth, I'm hoping the spray glue can't either. Anyone have an opinion?

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    934
    I tried spray basting when it first hit the market and was disappointed, but this thread makes me think I should give it another try.
    Penny aka PLS 1946

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Gardnerville, NV
    Posts
    52
    I put down my cardboard cutting board on my table then I use Sharon Schamber's (sp)method of using the boards. You can find it on Youtube. She hand bastes but I have adapted it to spray basting and it has worked well for me. I too do a little at a time and it stays smooth.

  20. #20
    Senior Member omaluvs2quilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    924
    I have a difficult time getting down on the floor, but I spray baste even king & queen size with 505. I do it in the garage with the door open and a plastic painter sheet taped down on the floor. It helps to have a second pair of hands, I have my husband help me. I lay the batting down first, place the backing on and smooth first with my hands and then with an old 24 x 6" ruler (softly). Once that looks good, I pull back to the mid-point and spray lightly approx. 2 ft x width and with one of us on each side, slowly settle the quilt down flat & smooth out, repeat til you get to the end and do the same with the top. I let the glue set for a few minutes and carefully turn the quilt over and repeat for the front. It makes fmq a breeze!

    I do wear latex gloves to protect my acrylic nails, that stuff does not come off of acrylic (rulers either) except with solvents.

  21. #21
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    1,211
    Quote Originally Posted by majormom View Post
    I was just ready to suggest using a (or two or three) bed sheet(s) to cover everything around the spraying area, and then just washing them after. I stopped using spray basting because I have COPD, but I am going back to it 'cuz it's so much easier. I'm going to hold a wet face cloth over my nose and mouth, (like they tell you to when in a burning building to keep the smoke at bay) and then I'm going to spray away! Hope it works! If smoke can't get through the wet face cloth, I'm hoping the spray glue can't either. Anyone have an opinion?
    Majormom, I have severe asthma and we keep respirator masks in the house. They are the white ones with two straps to go over your head and the number is N95. They can be bought at Home Depot, or Lowe's and are not very
    expensive. I use them all the time, cleaning, yard work, spray basting. Using the mask frees up both your hands.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    430
    Quote Originally Posted by EllieGirl View Post
    Majormom, I have severe asthma and we keep respirator masks in the house. They are the white ones with two straps to go over your head and the number is N95. They can be bought at Home Depot, or Lowe's and are not very
    expensive. I use them all the time, cleaning, yard work, spray basting. Using the mask frees up both your hands.
    I have COPD too and would strongly suggest using a respiratory mask. We keep them here to use when I use any chemicals to clean or work on something. Works like a charm.

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Manchester, NH
    Posts
    701
    Thank you Elliegirl and gigi712 for your input on the respiratory masks. I didn't know where to get such a thing, but I will absolutely get one before my next quilt basting session which will be before this coming weekend. I so appreciate your help.

  24. #24
    Super Member judykay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,444
    Blog Entries
    18
    I also use spray basting, just be careful and use the one for temporary hold. I use a craft one also for various other things and when I spray basted my last wall hanging I grabbed the wrong can and it was very difficult to quilt through and made the fabric extremely stiff.
    Happy Quilting
    Judy in Lower Michigan

  25. #25
    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    8,051
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by majormom View Post
    I was just ready to suggest using a (or two or three) bed sheet(s) to cover everything around the spraying area, and then just washing them after. I stopped using spray basting because I have COPD, but I am going back to it 'cuz it's so much easier. I'm going to hold a wet face cloth over my nose and mouth, (like they tell you to when in a burning building to keep the smoke at bay) and then I'm going to spray away! Hope it works! If smoke can't get through the wet face cloth, I'm hoping the spray glue can't either. Anyone have an opinion?
    DH has a mask he uses when spraying the finish on his woodworking projects. Not the paper filter type. I think his has replaceable filters. Check at the hardware store to see if you can find one.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.