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Thread: What should I charge?

  1. #26
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    I would charge more. If this person tells people how much it cost, then they will ecpect the same price.

  2. #27
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    Maybe its just me...but there is no way I would ay 300.00 for a quilt...that is a car payment...though my cars are paid off...

    my thought...It all depends on if its a job or a hobby. If you price low you will get more business...but if you get too much business it will seem like work and not a hobby. I am going to start doing it for free for raffles....so when I do walkathons I don't have to beg for money...I will use the raffle tickets. I also am donating to a animal thrift shop. all profit goes to the animals

  3. #28
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    How about setting an hourly rate? Tell them that, since you are just starting out with commission work, you will be using their projects to figure out a rate to charge in the future.

  4. #29
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    My quilter charges (for basic quilting design) .015 psi plus $13 (for a queen) for machine attaching the binding on front
    Then I hand sew it to the back

  5. #30
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    I have altered clothes for years and sold various crafts and am a free lance Home Economist/Consultant- all work where I set my own prices.

    This is my best advice- esp since this customer is NOT IMMEDIATE family, really she isn't. Charge more -think of what you would or have paid and charge at least that. I believe when you cheapen yourself and your skills you send a message to others and yourself that you are not worth it. Set a good price, a fair price but do not discount yourself. Tell the customer your price and make no apologies. If you are questioned, the answer is "frankly I am committed to great work and charge a price that makes me be able to devote the time and effort to give you the wonderful results you have a right to expect." IMHO It is better to lose those customers that want too low prices and get paid for the quality work you do.This family discount - and lets face it she is much removed- phooey- creates a bunch of extra layers. Are you going to keep doing more at a discount, even when it eats into your family, personal time?? Would she discount for you? How much are your lives entwined?

    I also stress that I do not alter for just anyone- this is true- it weeds out bargain hunters that do not respect your skill and time and also creates a feeling of exclusivity. I only take referrals-keeps the payment problems down. This philosophy has worked for me- I can not handle all the work I am offered.

    Do not cheapen or discount your talents! We women tend to do that, I believe because of the fact that so much of our life/family work we are not monetarily compensated or recognized for.

    Now I relinquish my soap box to someone else...

  6. #31
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    I agree $65 is too low - I think my person charges .015 per sq inch for overall design.

  7. #32
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    Way to low in my way of thinking as well! Child that is alot of work!

  8. #33
    Junior Member ree-nee's Avatar
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    not enough. Go to ebay or google your question. I have seen others charging as much as $.75 per inch. Adds up to much more.

  9. #34
    Super Member ksea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kalady
    I have altered clothes for years and sold various crafts and am a free lance Home Economist/Consultant- all work where I set my own prices.

    This is my best advice- esp since this customer is NOT IMMEDIATE family, really she isn't. Charge more -think of what you would or have paid and charge at least that. I believe when you cheapen yourself and your skills you send a message to others and yourself that you are not worth it. Set a good price, a fair price but do not discount yourself. Tell the customer your price and make no apologies. If you are questioned, the answer is "frankly I am committed to great work and charge a price that makes me be able to devote the time and effort to give you the wonderful results you have a right to expect." IMHO It is better to lose those customers that want too low prices and get paid for the quality work you do.This family discount - and lets face it she is much removed- phooey- creates a bunch of extra layers. Are you going to keep doing more at a discount, even when it eats into your family, personal time?? Would she discount for you? How much are your lives entwined?

    I also stress that I do not alter for just anyone- this is true- it weeds out bargain hunters that do not respect your skill and time and also creates a feeling of exclusivity. I only take referrals-keeps the payment problems down. This philosophy has worked for me- I can not handle all the work I am offered.

    Do not cheapen or discount your talents! We women tend to do that, I believe because of the fact that so much of our life/family work we are not monetarily compensated or recognized for.

    Now I relinquish my soap box to someone else...
    Very, very well said!!

  10. #35
    Super Member jeannie t's Avatar
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    When you charge for your services its a job not a hobby so family or not you are entitled to a fair price , I think your to low. If you charge everyone the same it cannot come back to haunt you that you did Jane Does for less . Things do leak out and it could hurt your future business with others or hurt feelings. good luck!

  11. #36
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kalady
    I have altered clothes for years and sold various crafts and am a free lance Home Economist/Consultant- all work where I set my own prices.

    This is my best advice- esp since this customer is NOT IMMEDIATE family, really she isn't. Charge more -think of what you would or have paid and charge at least that. I believe when you cheapen yourself and your skills you send a message to others and yourself that you are not worth it. Set a good price, a fair price but do not discount yourself. Tell the customer your price and make no apologies. If you are questioned, the answer is "frankly I am committed to great work and charge a price that makes me be able to devote the time and effort to give you the wonderful results you have a right to expect." IMHO It is better to lose those customers that want too low prices and get paid for the quality work you do.This family discount - and lets face it she is much removed- phooey- creates a bunch of extra layers. Are you going to keep doing more at a discount, even when it eats into your family, personal time?? Would she discount for you? How much are your lives entwined?

    I also stress that I do not alter for just anyone- this is true- it weeds out bargain hunters that do not respect your skill and time and also creates a feeling of exclusivity. I only take referrals-keeps the payment problems down. This philosophy has worked for me- I can not handle all the work I am offered.

    Do not cheapen or discount your talents! We women tend to do that, I believe because of the fact that so much of our life/family work we are not monetarily compensated or recognized for.

    Now I relinquish my soap box to someone else...
    I agree - this is not immediate family. I always try to figure just how "ticked off' I will be to do hours and hours of work and get paid a pittance. If I'm doing it mainly as a favor for family and the little bit of money makes them feel like they've paid - then OK. I've often told them DO NOT TELL ANYONE WHO DID THIS or I'll come and take it back! :) But if your sister-in-law's mother-in-law's best friend Marge is going to expect the same price, then be carefull about charging too little. Like $65 is.

  12. #37
    Senior Member moosegirl's Avatar
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    We have places in east Tn that do over all pattern quilting starting at $50. includes batt and backing but if I do them myself I charge alot more. Moosegirl

  13. #38
    Junior Member ree-nee's Avatar
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    AMEN!

  14. #39
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    How many hours is it going to take to do the job?? What do you charge by the hour to sew.

  15. #40
    Super Member dphelps's Avatar
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    I think too low even at "family" price.

  16. #41
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    I did some repair work and charged "by the hour". Keep good records! I charged minimum wage which was about $5.75 an hour.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by gzbird101
    I have been hired to quilt 2 queen tops. Nothing fancy, just basic stitch in the ditch and then bind both. My dilema is that the lady who hired me is the mother in law of my sister in law so there is the family "thing". She doesn't expect me to cut my prices, but I know I will get a lot of repeat business from her and she will refer me to her quilting group so I want to give her a good deal. What would be a good price to charge her? I am thinking around $65 per quilt. Too much or not enough?? What does everyone else think or charge?
    That is too low. 1.5 to 2 cents an inch is the norm. Is she supplying batting and thread? I'd charge at least $125. Measure the top and see how much it works out to be.

  18. #43
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    Kalady, good advice! Be respectful of yourself and your talent.

  19. #44
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    Seems like you are really low on this. I sometimes can't quilt my quilts because of arthritis in my hands and wrists. I have two lovely ladies who will quilt for me and they charge me $150.00 per quilt. I don't think that is excessive for all the work they have to do. They don't have long arm quilters they have to use their machines to quilt. They do lovely work, are so very nice to deal with and I think they are worth every penny they charge me. One of the ladies is my Aunt Linda and the other lady is her daughter, my cousin, Patsy. They charge other people who they don't know and have no connection with a lot more than that. Their work is beautiful and they get it out in a hurry. No one complains about what they charge. They stay busy all the time. Don't de-value your labor even if it is for family. I sometimes piece quilt tops for my aunt and her daughter and they also pay me very well for my work.

  20. #45
    Senior Member jdeery's Avatar
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    I did one for someone, and charged $1.00 a yard of thread.
    (The Menonites here charge), And then also you can use the
    same for the binding. It comes to a fair price.

  21. #46
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    Around here, they charge 80.00 for a youth quilt. Yes that is low, especially if you think she will bring in clients for you, then your should price higer for future business.

  22. #47
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    Regardless of what you charge, you are getting into a sticky situation with in laws. Decide on a fair price that you would expect to get from others. AND let her know before you start advising her if she would like to look for a better price you would not be offended. Sound like a plan??

  23. #48
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    Regardless of what you charge, you are getting into a sticky situation with in laws. Decide on a fair price that you would expect to get from others. AND let her know before you start advising her if she would like to look for a better price you would not be offended. Sound like a plan??

  24. #49
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Well you will get repeat service but maybe they will also expect that low price. I have a friend who has a friend that does her quilting for a good deal but she tells everyone about it. I would give a fair price at which you are willing to do other people's work for the same price.

  25. #50
    Super Member koko's Avatar
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    I'd charge $135 and tell her you are giving her a discount off the $150 - $175 you normally would charge because she is part of the family. Do a wonderful quilting job and you'll have repeat business no matter what the price or who it is for!!

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