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Thread: When you buy starch

  1. #1
    Super Member mar32428's Avatar
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    In bulk,what proportions do you cut it with water? I would think you would want it straight to get the best stiffness. I have been using canned spray starch but find it a bit expensive.

  2. #2
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    LOL if you use it full strenght it will be stiff a a board! If you want it reeeel stiff go 1/2 & 1/2. I usually use 1/3 starch to 2/3 water, that's a good stiffness for piecing.

  3. #3
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    i use it 50/50

  4. #4
    Super Member mar32428's Avatar
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    Is this stiff enuf to hold biases?

  5. #5
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    it's stiff enough to hold the roof up.

  6. #6
    MNQuilter's Avatar
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    I also do 50/50. I want it to be board stiff, makes it easier to cut!

  7. #7
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mar32428
    Is this stiff enuf to hold biases?
    I mix Sta-Flo liquid laundry starch 1:1 with water, "paint" it onto my fabric using a large wall painting brush, toss the fabric in the dryer, and iron with steam. It comes out with about the stiffness of cardstock. It is *extremely* stable even for bias cuts. I use it this way on background fabric for machine applique also, and it is stiff enough that I do not need to use a stabilizer, even if I am doing satin stitch (no tunneling).

    Some people spray it on; I don't know if it comes out as stiff that way.

    Also, I'm not sure if there are other brands of starch on the market -- liquid or powdered -- so I'm not sure how other brands might work.

  8. #8
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I'm a 50/50 girl, too. I like to sew cardboard!

  9. #9
    Senior Member Rachel's Avatar
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    I read somewhere that you can make your own out of cornstarch, anyone ever tried that?

  10. #10
    Super Member Oklahoma Suzie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kathy
    LOL if you use it full strenght it will be stiff a a board! If you want it reeeel stiff go 1/2 & 1/2. I usually use 1/3 starch to 2/3 water, that's a good stiffness for piecing.
    I would use it this way.

  11. #11
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    Quote Originally Posted by mar32428
    Is this stiff enuf to hold biases?
    I mix Sta-Flo liquid laundry starch 1:1 with water, "paint" it onto my fabric using a large wall painting brush, toss the fabric in the dryer, and iron with steam. It comes out with about the stiffness of cardstock. It is *extremely* stable even for bias cuts. I use it this way on background fabric for machine applique also, and it is stiff enough that I do not need to use a stabilizer, even if I am doing satin stitch (no tunneling).

    Some people spray it on; I don't know if it comes out as stiff that way.

    Also, I'm not sure if there are other brands of starch on the market -- liquid or powdered -- so I'm not sure how other brands might work.
    i use sta-flo also, but i never thought of brushing it on. i use a purchased spray bottle. when i spray, i get spray all over the floor. then when i walk around, the tacky spray turns black from the bottoms of my shoes. lovely.

    when you remove it from the dryer, is it still damp, or totally dry? doesn't it have wrinkles set in all over it that are hard to iron out?

  12. #12
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    I use 50/50 in a spray bottle (small bottle) and I don't usually get too much overspray. I spray it on and then wait for it to soak in before ironing, which cuts down on the white flakes. I like my stuff semi-stiff. I don't use steam.

  13. #13
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I like the 50/50 mix too :D:D:D

  14. #14
    Senior Member RatherB Quilting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by butterflywing
    it's stiff enough to hold the roof up.
    LOL! My laugh for the day!

  15. #15
    Super Member mar32428's Avatar
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    Thanks so much for the info AND the laughs. I knew I could depend on you. I do a lot of PP but never thot of using starch to control the biases of which there are many.

    I knew I shuld have checked with you first before I put on a new roof. Starch would sure have been cheaper.

  16. #16
    Super Member JanetM's Avatar
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    I am a bit confused. I have never used starch but probably should give it a try. If the fabric is stiff like cardstock is it difficult to press your seam to one side?

  17. #17
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JanetM
    I am a bit confused. I have never used starch but probably should give it a try. If the fabric is stiff like cardstock is it difficult to press your seam to one side?
    No. It actually helps the seams stay where you iron them. The starchiness breaks down a little as you handle the fabric, so it gradually gets softer. Of course, all the starch washes out later too.

  18. #18
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by butterflywing
    when you remove it from the dryer, is it still damp, or totally dry? doesn't it have wrinkles set in all over it that are hard to iron out?
    I just let it get totally dry. It doesn't seem overly wrinkled to me, and I've never had any problem ironing wrinkles out. The only time I had problems ironing wrinkles out was years ago, when I used to prewash my fabric -- alway came out a tangled mess.

    When I starch, I'm usually just starching one piece of yardage at a time -- background fabric for machine applique, for example, or fabric to be cut into bias binding. Maybe that helps?

    I don't use this method for the fabrics I am going to piece together unless it is a flannel quilt or something odd that is going to have a lot of bias edges. For regular piecing, I just don't pre-wash my fabrics. They have enough stiffener in them already for accurate piecing. If I did want more stability in this kind of fabric, I would spray a little starch on.

  19. #19
    Super Member JanetM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    Quote Originally Posted by JanetM
    I am a bit confused. I have never used starch but probably should give it a try. If the fabric is stiff like cardstock is it difficult to press your seam to one side?
    No. It actually helps the seams stay where you iron them. The starchiness breaks down a little as you handle the fabric, so it gradually gets softer. Of course, all the starch washes out later too.
    I need to try this, particularly when there are bias edges. Thanks!

  20. #20
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    i was thinking yardage. like 3 - 4 yards. i wonder what would happen. it would still be mess, but it might still iron up well.

  21. #21
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by butterflywing
    i was thinking yardage. like 3 - 4 yards. i wonder what would happen. it would still be mess, but it might still iron up well.
    Mine always irons up well after starching. I do use steam; I think that helps.

  22. #22
    Super Member Gramof6's Avatar
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    ROFLOL about it holding the roof up. :D :D :D

    If you accidently iron a wrinkle in, you may need a jackhammer to get that sucker out. :D I love a good stiff starch for a bias pc.

  23. #23
    Senior Member magnolia's Avatar
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    I didn't know they made a powdered starch. I always buy it in a can from the dollar store.

  24. #24
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by butterflywing
    i was thinking yardage. like 3 - 4 yards. i wonder what would happen. it would still be mess, but it might still iron up well.
    here i meant could i do yardage by brushing it on? after drying in the dryer would it be too twisted to iron out the wrinkles or would it still work? right now i do tons of yards by spraying as i go and draping it into a laundry basket on the other end. i fold in quarters, hand-press, then spray and iron. drape over and repeat. out of one basket, into another. using this back-breaking method i can do up to ten yards for a backing at one time. then, when they let me out, i'm ready to quilt again.

  25. #25
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by butterflywing
    here i meant could i do yardage by brushing it on? after drying in the dryer would it be too twisted to iron out the wrinkles or would it still work?
    That's exactly what I do and it works fine. It is *much* easier than spraying! I lay the yardage out on my kitchen island and "paint" a section at a time, folding the fabric on top of itself as I go. The fabric is saturated by the time I am finished. I just throw it in the dryer that way. I have never had a problem ironing any wrinkles out with steam. I think the starch makes ironing easier. Also, there is no risk of scorching the starch because the starch is completely dry before I start to iron.

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