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Thread: whole cloth quilts

  1. #26
    Senior Member anita211's Avatar
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    Hi Judee,

    A wholecloth quilt is one that is generally white on white or natural on natural. It isn't a cheater quilt. There is not cheating in the literally thousands of stitches that goes into it. And there is no pattern. It is just a vast expanse of white fabric with a design sewn by hand to it.

    Anita in Northfield

  2. #27
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    all judee and i meant is that the kits are already marked with the design and you follow along the pattern.

    some quilt shops call these preprinted quilting markings "cheater" because you do not have to mark an entire cloth with your quilting pattern.

    this is why i suggested to the original poster that she might like to start with a preprinted panel as her first step into the "whole cloth" quilting arena.

    this was not meant to be an insult to other people who are very skilled in this area of quilting nor was it meant to be view as a super easy project - it was meant in the tone that it was given - merely a nice jumping off point into this style of work.


  3. #28
    Power Poster Ninnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kluedesigns
    all judee and i meant is that the kits are already marked with the design and you follow along the pattern.

    some quilt shops call these preprinted quilting markings "cheater" because you do not have to mark an entire cloth with your quilting pattern.

    this is why i suggested to the original poster that she might like to start with a preprinted panel as her first step into the "whole cloth" quilting arena.

    this was not meant to be an insult to other people who are very skilled in this area of quilting nor was it meant to be view as a super easy project - it was meant in the tone that it was given - merely a nice jumping off point into this style of work.
    You are absolutely right, Klue!

    I also have heard them called "cheater" for that reason, that they are already pre printed and it does make it a lot easier to hand quilt them. It's just a term it doesn't mean they are easy! :wink:

    They are beautiful and The Stencil Company sells them quilt tops, table cloths, and even Christmas tree skirts. They are anything but easy. And it is not an insult to call them cheaters, just a term! :D

    Ninnie


  4. #29
    Senior Member judee0624's Avatar
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    Thanks, Klue and Ninnie. I am not the "quilt police". You stated it well.

    judee

  5. #30
    Senior Member anita211's Avatar
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    Please forgive me, ladies. I had never heard of preprinted quilts like the ones Benartex makes as cheaters. To me a cheater quilt is one that is preprinted with color and all you do is quilt on lines to make it look like you sewed all those little pieces together and then quilted it.

    I certainly am not the quilt police. I am, though, truly passionate about the subject. I have been quilting for close to 30 years and will continue until I can't see any longer to sew. There is, IMHO, too much bastardazation already. Quilts started as utilitarian. They were made using fabrics from old shirts, jackets, and dresses. The backings were large sheets and the batting was usually some cotton wadding or a blanket. They were held together with either hundreds of hand stitches or tied with yarn.

    Today, everybody and their aunt want to use a long arm to get the quilting done in a hurry. There is not a lot of thought into what the quilting should be. Should we echo, should we stitch in the ditch, or should we tie it because it is going on the bed and will be washed probably a hundred times before it starts to fall apart. (I have a quilt like that. It is 27 years old and was washed almost monthly for each of those years. A few dogs and numerous cats slept on it. Cats tore the weakening fabric with their back claws. I will never part with it!) That used to be the dilemma of every quillter... what type of quilting pattern should be used on the finished top?

    I truly believe, and I know that I am not alone in this, is that a quilt is something that is sewn and then quilted by hand. It takes months to complete it, but you have something that is truly worthy to be passed on to progeny. Art quilts are another story and use whatever methods one can think of to hold the layers together. They are art, and are usually treated as such. And comforters are tied quilt tops. They are layered and then tied. They can be bound or not. And there usually is one or two rows of machine stitching on the borders, mostly for stability.

    Okay, I am climbing down off my soapbox. I am in the process of doing a down and dirty comforter for my bed. It is called the Lover's Knot and is by Eleanor Burns. I sewed 56 blocks yesterday and am on the last round on the final 42. Tomorrow I will put it together. I pray the quilt shop is open... I need her tables!!! It is also the quilt pattern of the quilt that I spoke of earlier. Eleanor would be proud... I have a book that was copyrighted in 1985. I will make more from it. I love the pattern, and I love how it goes together.

    Have a lovely evening, ladies. I am.

    Anita in Northfield

  6. #31
    Super Member Carol W's Avatar
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    I can't wait to see your whole cloth quilt!!!

  7. #32
    Senior Member anita211's Avatar
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    Carol,

    I guess I don't understand... I am working on a beautiful purple, lilac, and green Lover's Knot. I am not working on a wholecloth. I don't even have any that I have completed as my son and daughter-in-law has one, my stepson has one, my step-daughter has one, and I believe my ex-mother-in-law has one. I can get pics from my son... my stepson and stepdaughter are no longer on speaking terms with their father and myself.

    Anita in Northfield

  8. #33
    Super Member kwhite's Avatar
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    The preprinted quilts in question was my first choice simply because of the ease of assembly. Even so I put in approximately 500,000 stitches. Even though it was pre printed it was a challenge. I feel that I made a good choice doing it first and think it will be a good choice for you as well. There may be people who may try to make you think it is less then another quilt cause it was preprinted but don't let them lessen your achievement. I let them do that to me but came to realize my quilt is wonderful and I am very proud of it. Anyone that knows quilts will know how much work went into it. Quilt for YOU!!!

  9. #34
    Senior Member anita211's Avatar
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    I am for the pre-stenciled ones! I have marked them and know that they are hard to do. I prefer to use those from Benartex. If you all would look back, you would see that I was the first to mention pre-stenciled ones that I got on eBay.

    Anita in Northfield

  10. #35
    Senior Member k_jupiter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anita211
    I truly believe, and I know that I am not alone in this, is that a quilt is something that is sewn and then quilted by hand. It takes months to complete it, but you have something that is truly worthy to be passed on to progeny.

    Anita in Northfield
    So Anita... What exactly am I working on? I machine piece, I now have a mid-arm machine that I do the quilting on. It's not a quilt? What is it exactly?

    Oh yes, it takes many months for me to complete my what-ever-they-ares because, I have a real job too.

    tim, confused, in san jose

  11. #36
    Super Member Carol W's Avatar
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    My comment was to Quilter 1234.

    I can't wait to see the wholecloth quilt. :)

  12. #37
    Senior Member anita211's Avatar
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    Tim,

    My quilting friends and I here in MN, think a real quilt is one that is hand quilted. I am not speaking of art quilts. I have seen some of your work, Tim, and you make a whole lot of art stuff, even though you use some traditioanal patterns. I don't care how long it takes to machine quilt something. When it is done, it is not soft usually. It can't be with metallic thread or that yucky plastic fishing line-type stuff that is used.

    I have a quilt on my bed that I bought on eBay because my old one was tearing and was close to totally worn out. It is lovely, and I am happy with it, except it isn't soft. The denseness of the stippling makes it hard. It doesn't drape nicely, to take a word from my former tailoring life. I believe that quilts should be soft. I have an antique hand quilted Amish quilt that is soft. Even after all these years, it is soft. And it drapes lovely over a railing. Hawaiian echo quilts are lovely and they are densely quilted, and they are still soft.

    I am working on a machine sewn, tied comforter. I will put in some edge stitching on the borders. It is utilitarian and will be used on my bed that also houses a dog, cat and 200 lb. man. It isn't meant to be anything other that it is. It is a bed cover. I have seen it quilted in the ditch which is almost as utilitarian as you can get, but on a large quilt, it takes time. I am doing something 'down and dirty' to get it done.

    Google Lovers Knot by Eleanor Burns to see the pattern. Or go to Amazon and do the same thing... you will find the pattern I am using. I have two rows around 42 half log cabin blocks to complete. Then a good ironing, and it will be put together and ironed again. I made the first one in a day or two, and that included cutting. This one will take a week. No biggie. I have the one that is there if I need warmth.

    I am not going to discuss what my thoughts are any longer on what is or isn't a quilt. I was trying to help with wholecloths which are hand quilted.

    I don't care what others think. I have been doing this for a long time, and feel that a real quilt is one that is machine sewn and is quilted by hand. Or, in the case of the Grandmother's Garden, the English paper piecing by hand is implemented.

    I will continue with the craft as I see fit. I bet there are people here that knit, crochet, or cross stitch also. And I bet there are as many ways to do that as there is quilting. Get off my case. I call it an art regardless of the finished product.

    Anita in Northfield

  13. #38
    Junior Member QuiltyLisa's Avatar
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    I have a whole cloth wall hanging in the works and I have been working on hand quilting it off and on for a year. Its alot of work.
    here is the link to the one I am working on. its the Welsh wall hanging.

    http://www.ericas.com/quilting/wholecloth.htm

    Lisa

  14. #39
    Power Poster Ninnie's Avatar
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    I too am a hand quilter , NOT because I think that is the only right way to do it, just because that is the way I like to do it! It is only a matter of preference.


    To say that all other quits are not real , is just not so! I have seen beautiful machine quilts on this board, and I have been filled with envy for them I have tried to quilt on my machine, and haven't been able to learn how yet, so I know it is hard to learn!

    I also have watched longarm quilters do their craft, and I do mean craft! It is a hard thing to learn to do , and the freearm quilting is just beautiful. It takes these quilters a long time to learn the art of longarm quilting.

    Any quilt that is made with love, is special! no mater how it is quilted. And machine quilts can and are soft also!


    I am not a "QUILTING SNOB" and definitely not the Quilt Police, they scare me. :wink:

    There is room in this quilting world of ours for all quilters and for that I am truly grateful

    Now, about art quilts! Those are in a whole class of their own! People who make them are so talented and creative, that sometimes it blows my mind. The hours they spend designing and sewing these. I can only imagine how frustrating it must be when something doesn't work for them and they have to start all over. Again I have been envious of some of them.


    So now I will get down off of my soap box!

    I am just an old fashioned quilter that loves all kinds of quilts!


    Ninnie in NC




  15. #40
    Power Poster Ninnie's Avatar
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    Sorry 1234, It seems we have sorta of hijacked your post! Not a nice tihng to do, You just hang in there and do it your way and I truly can't wait to see pictures~! Ninnie

  16. #41
    Super Member sdeaaz's Avatar
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    Not to worry Ninnie. Good to see a good discussion. Just shows how dedicated we all are to our craft. I am making a few baby things right now, so just doing research on whole quilts... I will definately post my project when I get it done. Thanks for all the enthusiam. Quilter1234

  17. #42
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    anita

    just one correction about your thesis.

    i was the first to mention the preprinted panels. i even posted the link to benartex. i try not to promote any certain online store or ebay seller thats why i directed the original poster to benartex.

    you're opinion on what is and isn't a quilt is extremely outdated, narrow minded, and will prevent you from growing as an artist.

    if you go to any quilt show around the country you will see that the art comes in many forms and maybe if you could view things without prejudice you might actually learn a thing or two from what you consider "non-quilters".

  18. #43
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    it seems that we all love what we do, so much, that we protect it, like we would our family, but this board is like a family too, so I hope that this discussion can just be a, agree-to-disagree, and let's just keep creating.
    As a person, (myself), that usually tries to categorize or organize, most things, I don't do that much with this craft. I just love it all. Their is something to behold in every piece, no matter what we call it. :wink:

  19. #44
    Senior Member k_jupiter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anita211
    Tim,

    My quilting friends and I here in MN, think a real quilt is one that is hand quilted. I am not speaking of art quilts. I have seen some of your work, Tim, and you make a whole lot of art stuff, even though you use some traditioanal patterns. I don't care how long it takes to machine quilt something. When it is done, it is not soft usually. It can't be with metallic thread or that yucky plastic fishing line-type stuff that is used.

    I have a quilt on my bed that I bought on eBay because my old one was tearing and was close to totally worn out. It is lovely, and I am happy with it, except it isn't soft. The denseness of the stippling makes it hard. It doesn't drape nicely, to take a word from my former tailoring life. I believe that quilts should be soft. I have an antique hand quilted Amish quilt that is soft. Even after all these years, it is soft. And it drapes lovely over a railing. Hawaiian echo quilts are lovely and they are densely quilted, and they are still soft.

    I am working on a machine sewn, tied comforter. I will put in some edge stitching on the borders. It is utilitarian and will be used on my bed that also houses a dog, cat and 200 lb. man. It isn't meant to be anything other that it is. It is a bed cover. I have seen it quilted in the ditch which is almost as utilitarian as you can get, but on a large quilt, it takes time. I am doing something 'down and dirty' to get it done.

    Google Lovers Knot by Eleanor Burns to see the pattern. Or go to Amazon and do the same thing... you will find the pattern I am using. I have two rows around 42 half log cabin blocks to complete. Then a good ironing, and it will be put together and ironed again. I made the first one in a day or two, and that included cutting. This one will take a week. No biggie. I have the one that is there if I need warmth.

    I am not going to discuss what my thoughts are any longer on what is or isn't a quilt. I was trying to help with wholecloths which are hand quilted.

    I don't care what others think. I have been doing this for a long time, and feel that a real quilt is one that is machine sewn and is quilted by hand. Or, in the case of the Grandmother's Garden, the English paper piecing by hand is implemented.

    I will continue with the craft as I see fit. I bet there are people here that knit, crochet, or cross stitch also. And I bet there are as many ways to do that as there is quilting. Get off my case. I call it an art regardless of the finished product.

    Anita in Northfield
    Anita,

    We are all allowed our own opinions. I'll just let your words stand by themselves.

    If you talked with anyone who has discussed quilting with me, you would know I don't do 'Art' quilts. They are very interesting but not what I am interested in doing. My quilts are used. They lie on someones bed, they are used in TV rooms to let persons or people snuggle under them while enjoying life together. None of my quilts hang on a wall.

    So off I go to work on another one of my 'bed covers'. I sure hope the couple who gets this one for their newborn appreciates that I made the 'bed cover' for them and their baby boy and won't consider that if I did it by hand, that kid would have graduated college by the time he got it.

    Please say 'Hi' to the others in your guild. I suspect I won't ever have the opportunity to ever talk with them.

    tim in san jose

  20. #45
    Super Member sdeaaz's Avatar
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    Do any of you know Sharon Schamber? She is an Arizona quilter that has won in Paducah and is a teacher.
    Her web site has some free videos and one is on hoopless hand quilting. In my search for whole cloth info I ran across this and want to share the site.
    Just go to the area for free on line classes... there are others too. Hope you enjoy as much as I did. Even seasoned quilters may learn a few things.
    http://sharonschambernetwork.com/fre...oopless/1.html
    quilter1234

  21. #46
    Junior Member Gramily's Avatar
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    Hi,

    You really don't need a good source except your brain!! Determine the size of the quilt you would like and draw a design on the fabric (usually muslin or a plain fabric). If you are good at drawing go for it. If not use templates.

    Many years ago I made one 108" x 108", all hand quilted. Took me a couple of years. I had the design drawn by a woman that did this in Canada.

    Emily, FL

  22. #47

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    my first quilt was a whole cloth - done for my Mother- all by hand without a hoop. didn't know a thing, just started out and did it. have done 2 more since for two of my daughters. one all white thread, other done in colors to bring out the basket of pansies. I bought four of these beautiful whole cloth tops, all hand stenciled from a sweet Amish lady - her husband helped her stencil. I doubt she is still doing, as she was elderly when I purchased six or seven years ago. truly worth the effort

  23. #48

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    I just finished a whole cloth quilt about a month ago. It was the first time I had tried it and it was a real treat. I will do it again.
    I found a book by Marianne Fons (Fons & Porter) called Fine Feathers, because this is what I wanted to do on my quilt, but it has several projects both large and small. I found the instructions on how to place the pattern you want to do so easy, it surprised me.
    I don't think you will get any more satisfaction from anything, like hand quilting a quilt like this.

    Pam in WV

  24. #49
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    Anita and Quilter:

    Have never been to Northfield, but I do know where it is...I'm in the southwestern corner of MN, near Worthingon.

    I've never yet tried a whole cloth quilt, but I do have a pattern of my late mother's, and she got it from a church group who posted a picture of it in the COF magazine! It took awhile for her to get it, as half the pattern was traced on an old bedsheet! Mom made severa of those quilts as wedding gifts, but didn't always use white thread in the quilting. She sometimes used the color the bride and groom had chosed as their color for the wedding. When mom used color, it was usually perle cotton, and it was striking against the white background. My goal is to do a whole cloth quilt for each of our children for their 10th wedding anniversaries...and two of the kids have already celebrated 7 years! Guess I'd better get a move on, huh?!?

    Jojo

  25. #50
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    Anita, your 'soapbox' was rather informative! I can remember seeing pieces of fabric my mom had used in making a dress or blouse for me sewn into a quilt top my grandmother had made. (Mom would give her all fo the remnants). In fact, the Log Cabin quilt I received from Grandma for a graduation gift has some remnants of clothing scraps from my childhood. And I've been taking DH's old jeans and cutting them apart when he no longer wears them...I've offerd to patch them, but he'd rather opt for a new pair or two...Oh, welll the backs of the legs are good yet! And yes, I do machine quilt, but it's the 'stitch-in-the-ditch' that works best for me. I'll eventually move on the the free-motion, but I have to find time to practice it!

    Thanks for your little lesson!

    Jojo

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