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Thread: why I try for precision and accuracy with my piefing projects

  1. #1
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    why I try for precision and accuracy with my piefing projects

    Because I am easily frustrated -

    Things go together

  2. #2
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    why I try for precision and accuracy with my piecing projects

    Because I am easily frustrated when things do not line up properly.

    Things go together so much better when:

    The fabric is properly prepared before cutting it - for me, it has been washed and ironed.
    Grain lines matter to me.

    I have done the test strips so I know that my current cutting line up ( ruler and where/ how I line it up) and needle setting will yield the expected result.

    The blocks are all approximately (within 1/8 inch) the expected size.

    It just goes together so much more easily if it is " right" from the start.

    The reason for the carefulness now is because of some pathetic results in the past.

    I can "fudge" with the best of them. I just prefer not to.

    By the way - there have been times when " good enough" was left the way it was. It did bother me. - but not quite enough to do it over.

    I do not put in any deliberate mistskes - God knows there are always a few unintended ones in anything I make - no matter how much care I put into a project.

  3. #3
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    I agree. I think being as precise as one can at each step of the piecing process leads to much less frustration AND work at the end of the project. This is why I square each element of the blocks/rows/quilt as I go.

  4. #4
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    I try for that also, figure the more I try the better I will get and eventually it will be ingrained in my tine little brain. Practice, Practice, Practice - might not make perfection but you keep getting better and better

  5. #5
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    I try but don't beat myself up over it. I am perfectly imperfect.

  6. #6
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I also agree. I like patterns with lots of pieces so just being consistent isn't going to work. I usually check my needle position when I start a new project. It only takes 2 minutes, but it saves hours of frustration. I would rather use the correct seam allowance and have pieces fit than easing/stretching stuff. Struggling to get things to match takes all the fun out of it for me.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  7. #7
    Super Member SueSew's Avatar
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    bearisgray, AMEN TO THAT!
    Accurate piecing means you aren't trimming up blocks only to find that points are cut off or other mismatches occur and then puzzling out what to do about it.

    When I was just starting out, a Board member here, MTS, recommended I read Sally Collins' book on machine piecing and I did. It is not just a technique book, it is a philosophy and it totally changed how I was piecing - new attitude, perspective about precision. Neither patience nor precision were particular virtues of mine, but I have learned them through quilting
    SueSew
    "If it's messy, eat it over the sink!" Mom

  8. #8
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    Here's a link to the other posting with similar comment but further discussion. http://www.quiltingboard.com/main-f1...s-t262788.html

  9. #9
    Super Member Snooze2978's Avatar
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    I try to be precise but it seems I never am. I rarely square up my blocks before putting them together either. Just made 4 lap quilts using the exact same pattern and technique. They all came out a different size by maybe 1.4-1/2 inch. Go Figure!!!! But each one seem to come out better than the one before so I guess repetition is a good thing.
    Suz in Iowa
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  10. #10
    Super Member grammysharon's Avatar
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    I'm with you. I have learned that if there is a mistake I have to fix it or I won't be happy with the quilt. I have had a quilt completed and noticed I had a block turned. I took out all the quilting, then took out the block, turned it the right way, appliqued it back in and re-quilted. I am a lot more careful now in checking a quilt top before I begin quilting.
    A quilt is a blanket of love. Sharon

  11. #11
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    ...my own philosophy is to do the best job I can....in whatever I am doing.....quilting, cooking, cleaning( gag me with a spoon)........ It's a reflection on me...and use of my time.....now, don't get me wrong, I am not anal about any of it, just follow the steps and make sure all is right.....then the results are good!.....well... There have been a few " what the....?"

  12. #12
    Power Poster Mariposa's Avatar
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    I agree with you bear. Trying to get it right the first time saves me added frustration later on.
    Be a blessing to others, as you may entertain angels unaware!

  13. #13
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    For me, it takes way less time to slow down and get it right than to have to adjust and compensate when the blocks are sewn together. Far more enjoyable, too. Not that I always manage this . . .

    hugs,
    Charlotte

  14. #14
    Super Member Onebyone's Avatar
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    I do my best but I don't care if my piecing is not perfect. It' not a priority for me. Since I use the Go for most all my cutting I have noticed my piecing is darn near great without a lot of striving.
    I don't believe in making a deliberate mistake on a quilt and according to my Amish friend neither do they.
    I love my life!

  15. #15
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    My proofreading leaves something to be desired!

  16. #16
    Senior Member HouseDragon's Avatar
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    *LOL* I've never had to make a deliberate mistake: there's going to be one in there somewhere! If it's teeny tiny, it will probably stay but if it's a giant-jump-out-at-you-and-grab-you-by-the-throat mistake, it's going to be fixed!

    I've found if I take a photo, mistakes are waaaay easier to spot than just looking at the quilt in the making.

    However, I do try to be as perfect as I can be. That means measuring three times, cutting once; sewing as accurate a seam as possible; squaring up if needed. I don't like the "make it oversize, then cut it down" method: it wastes too much fabric.

    If I take it slow and easy and careful, there's less frogging to do!

    Oh! And READ the instructions!
    If life gives you lemons, make Limoncello!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by grammysharon View Post
    I'm with you. I have learned that if there is a mistake I have to fix it or I won't be happy with the quilt. I have had a quilt completed and noticed I had a block turned. I took out all the quilting, then took out the block, turned it the right way, appliqued it back in and re-quilted. I am a lot more careful now in checking a quilt top before I begin quilting.
    You're a better quilter than I am doing all of that! Then again, it wasn't until I was looking at a photo months after the quilt was gifted that I noticed I had done that! Grr. Suppose I should photo and LOOK at the photo BEFORE gifting next time!

  18. #18
    Super Member GingerK's Avatar
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    I have learned that I am not perfect. Doesn't mean I've stopped trying to make each top as perfect as I can, but I no longer "sweat the small stuff". If I have to be within 12 inches of the spot, to see a boo-boo, then it is minor enough to (probably) let go. I strive to make each quilt better than its predecessor. I have learned that the journey is often more fun, rewarding, and fulfilling than the end result. I am usually sad to see that last border attached. Hmmmmm......maybe that is why I have all these UFO's.....
    Never argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down the their level and beat you with experience.

  19. #19
    Super Member liking quilting's Avatar
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    Well said!
    Mavis

  20. #20
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    All I can say is I am getting a little better. I have never been in a hurry when I cut and piece and I do a lot of starch and pressing and I pin always. I know I take a lot of time but I am not in a race. I do the best I can and no one that I give these items to like my family they do not sew and they don't know or realize how long it took to make this and they don't know the first thing about any imperfections. I am lucky about that!
    Suzanne
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  21. #21
    Junior Member Madan49's Avatar
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    I totally agree! Doing it right to begin with saves you time in the long run! I think it does beginners a disservice to tell them that no one will notice if they do a terrible job! Help them learn the BASICS, then teach them how to do the best work they can do with those. Yes, they will improve as they go along.... after 60 years of sewing I'm still learning! But it's important to start from the very beginning with the attitude of always trying to do your best work. That old "no one will see it on a galloping horse" saying always drove me NUTS! Is that how people are going to see your work? On a galloping horse? Instead, find something realistic to praise... the use of color, the improvements they're making... every project has a good point you can use to give the quilter a pat on the back for effort. And then give them a leg up the rung to the next stage! Don't bog them down in mediocrity by telling them bad work is good enough, but don't be mean, either!!

  22. #22
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I always try to be as precise on each step as possible. My self rule is I try to fix mistakes three times, if it doesn't work then I move on. Making quilts often makes a lot of things easier, faster and better. I totally finish one quilt and start another. I bought my fabrics for me to sew up and I am trying to do it. What is left at the end, the girls can do with as they see fit.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  23. #23
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    It depends on the project and my mood. Some things require real precision, others not so much. I want to keep my frustration level under control. If I know that even I won't see a mismatched seam or a cut off point on a big quilt, then I am letting that go - unless I don't. I know what will cause me problems when putting a project together, so will do my best to avoid trouble at that stage. That is my goal in teaching a friend - if I know it won't go together, I suggest she redo it - otherwise, up to her how perfect it needs to be.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madan49 View Post
    I totally agree! Doing it right to begin with saves you time in the long run! I think it does beginners a disservice to tell them that no one will notice if they do a terrible job! Help them learn the BASICS, then teach them how to do the best work they can do with those. Yes, they will improve as they go along.... after 60 years of sewing I'm still learning! But it's important to start from the very beginning with the attitude of always trying to do your best work. That old "no one will see it on a galloping horse" saying always drove me NUTS! Is that how people are going to see your work? On a galloping horse? Instead, find something realistic to praise... the use of color, the improvements they're making... every project has a good point you can use to give the quilter a pat on the back for effort. And then give them a leg up the rung to the next stage! Don't bog them down in mediocrity by telling them bad work is good enough, but don't be mean, either!!
    My feelings, too!

  25. #25
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    Quilting is a hobby to be enjoyed. Yes, you should try your best at making these special items but there is NO reason to get frustrated over mistakes. Everyone makes mistakes in quilting no matter how careful we try. Just enjoy the adventure of making such beautiful quilts and things that family and friends and sometimes anonymous individuals will enjoy the fruits of our labor.
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

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