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Thread: Is it worth saving?

  1. #1
    Junior Member bj riley's Avatar
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    My friends friend bought this quilt at a yard sale a long time ago. Neither friend wants it now that it is in such bad shape. A few of the squares are just gone but most do not look too bad to mem but what do I know. I have only been a quilter for a few months.
    I am thinking I can snip the ties, replace the rotten squares and put on a new batting and back. I would like your opinion. Do you think I would be wasting my time? Also wondering if you can get a feel for its age. Thanks for looking Bj
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  2. #2
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    It has such pretty fabrics in it! I don't have any idea about going about fixing it. I'm positive that someone will come along that will!

  3. #3
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    I would try to fix it.

  4. #4
    Kas
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    Super Member Kas's Avatar
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    I think that is a great idea. I would use red yarn to re-tie it. I think that red on the aqua is what really gives it punch. Looks like the 60's or 70's to me.

  5. #5
    Power Poster dkabasketlady's Avatar
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    I would also try to fix it! It's really very pretty!

  6. #6
    Super Member karenpatrick's Avatar
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    Someone spent a lot of time making it in the first place. I think it's worth saving and I would do it just as you suggested.

  7. #7
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    Are all the problems around the edges of the quilt? Is the rest of the backing okay? If so you might just cut off the edges, re-bind it, and not have to do any more work. From the pictures it does look like it's worth saving.

  8. #8
    Junior Member MamaQuilter's Avatar
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    I like your ideas for fixing it. I think if you do you will feel good about it. :)

  9. #9
    Super Member pojo's Avatar
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    I would try to fix it.

  10. #10
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    I'd definitely repair it. I rescued one recently fromt the 20 to 30's and I have to repair part of it and just got stuff to get the aging stains out of it. This quilt still has alot of long years of comfort to give.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Granny Quilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunster
    Are all the problems around the edges of the quilt? Is the rest of the backing okay? If so you might just cut off the edges, re-bind it, and not have to do any more work. From the pictures it does look like it's worth saving.
    I was thinking that too. If part is in the middle fix that and cut off the damaged edge. Definitely worth saving!

  12. #12
    Super Member grammiepamie's Avatar
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    every quilt deserves a chance to be repaired. With all the knowledge that flows thru this board someone will have the right answers. There are many many experts here. I can always find answers to that help me firgure out my problems. A wonderful group of ladies.

  13. #13
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    Some of those fabrics are from the 50's and maybe the 40's. I have some 50's scraps from when I was a kid that are very similar to some of those.

    Your plan for fixing sounds good to me. Try to replace the bad pieces with repro or vintage fabrics if possible. Good luck and post a picture of it when you are done.

  14. #14
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    A piece of Art, and yes quilts are art, is always worth saving.....if not as a full size quilt, could be cut down to a tabletopper, doll quilts, pillows....but by all means try to save it.....

  15. #15
    Super Member Maggiemay's Avatar
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    I just rescued a quilt for a friend of mine that was tied. I was afraid if I took out all of the ties it would leave holes. Most of them had pulled through on the back & it needed a new back & binding. I decided to put a new back on without taking off the old one- I really thought the whole thing would fall apart if I took it all apart. I did take off the binding though. It was a lot of work to get it flat enough to quilt. I then FMQ little circles around where each tie was. I really love how it came out- especially the back with all of the little circles in a pattern. It was more work than I thought, but I was glad to have saved a quilt.

  16. #16
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    If you have to take the back off, you might be able to salvage pieces from it to use for repairing the damaged blocks on the front. Just a thought...

  17. #17
    Super Member suebee's Avatar
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    Can you cut a large enough section and just frame it. They look really cool that way.

  18. #18
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Fix it or use it for a cutter quilt to make something pretty. I has very pretty fabrics and colors. Have fun. Please share with us when you are done.

  19. #19
    Super Member crafty pat's Avatar
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    I would try very hard to fix it. I could never give up on a quilt unless I did everything I could to fix it.

  20. #20
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kas
    I think that is a great idea. I would use red yarn to re-tie it. I think that red on the aqua is what really gives it punch. Looks like the 60's or 70's to me.
    ditto

  21. #21
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    It's very pretty. I like the fabric colors. Looks good enough to mend to me. As you say, it would be a fairly easy fix, since it is tied. :)

  22. #22
    a regular here hazeljane's Avatar
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    I'm thinking 60's. Most of the squares look 50's and 40's but a quilt is only as old as it's NEWEST square. I love it.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barb44
    Some of those fabrics are from the 50's and maybe the 40's. I have some 50's scraps from when I was a kid that are very similar to some of those.

    Your plan for fixing sounds good to me. Try to replace the bad pieces with repro or vintage fabrics if possible. Good luck and post a picture of it when you are done.
    barb44 has a good handle on the fabric...but i believe what you have here is a combo... it looks to me like someone had a stack of 4-patch blocks from the 40/50s and set them together late in the 60/70s...the turquoise fabrics that have not faded speak of a little poly in them and have not rotted as have some of the older fabrics in the body of the quilt. the red/turquoise combo might well have been done in the 60s, as well...but the clincher is the poly batting... while it was invented in the 50s, it was not commonly used for some time...this really looks like a stack of blocks were found under grannie's bed and someone put them together and tied it.

    is it worth saving? that is for you to say...but i will say that i repair many older quilt as has already been suggested...take off (and i mean 'pick off'....do not cut) the last row on the most damaged side or end...use those undamaged fabrics in those pieces to repair any other pcs in the remaining body...save all remaining pcs for future problems. you will probably find that most of the rotted blocks contained brown as they are the most caustic of the natural dyes used then and often disappear first...which means that a few more blocks may well go later.

    then the decision is to replace the back or not...i tell people to decide what they are trying to accomplish and then do what's best and not feel guilty. any quilt's value is judged by the newest fabric in it, not the oldest or even the majority...so this quilt may or may not have a huge monetary value, but it's value in terms of the collection of the typical 40s fabrics may be great to you.... you have to be the one to decide...

    so to replace back or not? is it more valuable to you with that original (60s) back...or would you rather have a new back to help strengthen the whole piece for generations to come? it's up to you, and you will get lots of advice about both points of view.... i tell people that just have an emotional attachment to a family piece, to put on the new back so that their antecedents will get to enjoy the quilt for another hundred years (just write down what they have done and why).... (remember, your quilt, if judged to be assembled in the 60s [you can test a tiny scrap of the turquoise to check for poly, which clinches the deal, datewise] is still more than 40 yrs old now...time goes fast....) the key is to document, document, document.....give all info you can find... fabric info from the blocks, test results on the sashings and back, purchase info from the friends, your advice from other quilters and why, your eventual choices regarding repairs, replacements, anything you learn and lots of pix..... and then find a way to keep a copy (back pocket, attached to frame, copy on disk, .... whatever works for you) WITH the quilt... then repair, put hanging rod pocket on the back of the quilt, and enjoy...do not repair a quilt this old and then toss it on a bed...it will not last as long and it's a lot of work so hang it up and enjoy, just get that documentation going....it's important for the next person who falls in love with it.

    my standard thing is, 'what do you wish someone had written down about the quilt when they were making it...what would YOU love to know about the quilt if they had written it down?' that's what you need to write down...

  24. #24
    Junior Member bj riley's Avatar
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    [quote=Maggiemay]I just rescued a quilt for a friend of mine that was tied. I was afraid if I took out all of the ties it would leave holes.

    Oh my, I did not think about the holes it would leave! I pulled some last night while at a friends house. Not much light. Did not realize I was making holes. So I guess I will have to do like you and leave the torn back on.
    Where would I look for retro fabric?

    Thank you all for your help. I knew I could count on you. I have a part quilt I want to talk to you about too.

    I hope you don't mind.

    you can see the holes on the left
    Name:  Attachment-276853.jpe
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  25. #25
    Senior Member LisaGibbs's Avatar
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    I would try and fix it, and if not, trim the fabric that is good and make a new one with smaller squares and new borders and fabric close enough to pass for the damaged ones. It is tied so it won't be that difficult to take apart. Worse case is you could make a couple smaller quilts.

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