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Thread: Your choice in Starch???

  1. #26
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    after reading bearlea's post I guess I've been lucky.. don't know why the little critters haven't done anything to my quilts.. Maybe they like art quilts??

  2. #27
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    This is why I said check for yourself...it might be an old wives tale for all I know for sure..but I did read it a few years ago on a well known quilt site..so I thought I would post the information just in case..blessings

  3. #28
    Super Member AnnaK's Avatar
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    I use Niagara when I starch. Walgreens regularly has it on sale for 99 cents.

  4. #29
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I don't starch my fabric until I get ready to use it. I guess if a quilt is made from starched fabric and not washed and stored away for years it would attract some bugs to the starch. At least the bugs are getting some use out of the quilt, no one else would be.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by pocoellie
    I use the Sta-Flo and dilute 50/50, I mix in a spray bottle, spray the fabrics I'm going to use, then let it sit for at least 2 hours, then toss in the dryer for a few minutes or let it air dry.
    Why let it dry and toss in the dryer? I thought that is why you spray and then iron. What does putting it in the dryer do? Is there a difference between ironing then or waiting?

    I remember my grandma sprinkling the cloths with a coke bottle with a top on it and putting it in the fridge for ironing later. Don't know what was in the bottle, but remember seeing the clothes in the fridge as a young child.

  6. #31
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    I prefer sizing.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    I use Mary Ellen's Best Press and only that. I use it because it's a starch alternative and will not attract bugs. Plus since it's not a starch it doesn't have the flaking problems starch has.
    Ditto! Best Press or if I have run out, sizing. No starch for the bug attraction reason. Mary Ellen's is rather expensive, but my philosophy is "You get what you pay for." I'll do without something if I have to. Just me.

  8. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    I use Mary Ellen's Best Press and only that. I use it because it's a starch alternative and will not attract bugs. Plus since it's not a starch it doesn't have the flaking problems starch has.
    Once I started using Mary Ellens , I have not used anything else. I hate how others mess up the bottom of my expensive iron. Buy it at Handcocks or on line.

  9. #34
    Senior Member hoppyfrog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marlene tarzwell
    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    I use Mary Ellen's Best Press and only that. I use it because it's a starch alternative and will not attract bugs. Plus since it's not a starch it doesn't have the flaking problems starch has.
    Once I started using Mary Ellens , I have not used anything else. I hate how others mess up the bottom of my expensive iron. Buy it at Handcocks or on line.
    To easily clean the bottom of your iron use a Mr Clean Magic Eraser on a cold iron. Works great.

  10. #35
    Super Member Gwyn's Avatar
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    I was taught, after washing & drying fabric, lay it out flat and then sprinkle. Roll up tightly and place in refrigerator until cold. Use a hot steam iron and a cold roll of fabric.

    Place fabric on the ironing board and press using as little starch as needed. Is this right? Cold damp fabric does iron nicely.

    Where do you get starch substitute?

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gwyn
    I was taught, after washing & drying fabric, lay it out flat and then sprinkle. Roll up tightly and place in refrigerator until cold. Use a hot steam iron and a cold roll of fabric.

    Place fabric on the ironing board and press using as little starch as needed. Is this right? Cold damp fabric does iron nicely.

    Where do you get starch substitute?
    You were taught well! Was taught the same thing and it made going into the refrigerator interesting. We put it in the refrigerator if we could not get to it that day to prevent "souring" or maybe mold. If it was going to be longer my mom was known to put it in the freezer...we had an upright.

  12. #37
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    My mother didn't work while I was growing up and did ironing for a lady that worked with my dad. She did the same thing. She's been gone for six years now and I have her water sprinkler. It's an old 7-up bottle with the cork stopper sprinkle head. It's on the shelf in my sewing room. Brings back a lot of good memories everytime I see it.

  13. #38
    Senior Member stefanib123's Avatar
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    I'm glad you started this thread, I've been wondering about starches, sizing ,etc.

  14. #39
    Super Member Gwyn's Avatar
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    Stefanib: Many quilters use starch to make the fabric stiff. This helps make a cleaner and more accurate cut by the blade of the cutter. It also makes fussy cutting more precise.

  15. #40
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    I love thatMary Ellens. I don't care how much it costs its worth the price. If you can find the refill jugs it helps. My fav quilt fabric shop will refill your spray bottle for a discount price. I really like the stuff , I even use it on some of my blouses. First time I used it I was shopping and I kept thinking a lady sure had a nice perfume on. When I got into my car I realized it was me! LOL My blouse was giving off the wonderful fragrance.

  16. #41
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    My favorite is Mary Ellen's, but it's so expensive that I've begun mixing the StaFlo myself for pressing my prewashed fabric. I'm looking for the non-aerosol Niagra, but haven't had any luck finding any. I tried sizing, but like my fabric just a little stiffer.

  17. #42
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    When I was a child,we never had a drier other than a clothesline. First we washed the clothes and hung them on the line to dry.Next we made starch on the stove in a large pan;when it was cool enough,we put all articles that needed starch into the pan and one by one, we soaked those clothes in the starch and hung them up on the line to dry. Then we sprinkled them with water from a sprinkler bottle, rolled them up to "season" for overnight and then we ironed them.
    I ironed most of them every day after school and learned to do my father's shirts well! He wore dress shirts every day and a fresh one if he had an evening meeting or event at the university where he taught.
    It was important that the starch soak every fiber before ironing or the shirts would be limp and look messy. When using starch these days, most people iron too quickly after spraying. I spray starch each one and stack it on top of a pile, then roll up and let sit while I do another pile or two. Then I iron, starting with the bottom of pile 1. If I don't get it done that day, I put it into a plastic bag and put it in the freezer.I end up with very nice fabric. My granddaughters like to iron it too when they are with me.
    "Anything worth doing is worth doing well " was how I was brought up--I am sure I wasn't the only one who remembers that !! Speed is great for some things, not for fabric.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by shequilts
    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    I use Mary Ellen's Best Press and only that. I use it because it's a starch alternative and will not attract bugs. Plus since it's not a starch it doesn't have the flaking problems starch has.
    I use only Mary Ellen's Best Press for all the above reasons I love the no flake part, especially on solid or dark colors.
    Karen
    I tried it one time, and have continued to use it and nothing else. I buy it by the gallon to cut the cost down.

  19. #44
    Junior Member cooper's Avatar
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    i use mary ellens

  20. #45
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    No starch here, just sizing.

  21. #46
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    I use the stuff at the dollar store. God bless.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by shequilts
    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    I use Mary Ellen's Best Press and only that. I use it because it's a starch alternative and will not attract bugs. Plus since it's not a starch it doesn't have the flaking problems starch has.
    I use only Mary Ellen's Best Press for all the above reasons I love the no flake part, especially on solid or dark colors.
    Karen
    Me too - I love Mary Ellen's Best Press!!
    I buy it in the gallon size!! :thumbup:

  23. #48
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    We always kept clothes in the fridge after they were sprinkled, rolled and put into a plastic bag.. What I'd like to know is who has room for clothes in their fridge now?? I don't think I could fit even a few shirts in my fridge, let alone a weeks ironing!!

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltmaker
    I use Mary Ellen's Best Press.
    Me too - it works and it smells pretty.

  25. #50
    Junior Member cooper's Avatar
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    LMBO
    I forgot my mom use to do that---i have never thought of doing it. never iron clothes here! lol...just fabric &
    press it out

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