Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 22 of 22

Thread: Tips needed

  1. #1
    Super Member dungeonquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,031

    Tips needed

    I need some tips for setting up a new sewing room. We will be moving into a new house soon, and I will have a dedicated room for my quilting. I want to maximize the space that I will have. No closets in this room, but I have 4 sets of shelves and a couple of wardrobes. I know it will be a long process to get organized after we move, but I have started by getting rid of a lot of old magazines. Having a real problem culling the patterns and books. I have always referred to my stash as my retirement fund, and really have too much to actually use up in my lifetime, but don't really want to downsize it, as I don't know what I will use.
    Thanks for any and all advice.
    Debra

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    7,518
    1. Measure and label your fabric when you store it.
    2. Decide if you are sorting by color or some other method.
    3. Use the comic book boards to fold them on and store them. Note that the only ones I was able to find were only acid free on one side, and there is nothing on either side to tell you whether it is acid free or not. Factor that into your decision to use or not use comic book boards. I have thought about cutting up empty cereal boxes and using them for folding and storage. I do use them for storing strips I have cut for checkerboard quilts.
    4. If you see fabrics in your stash that you know you won't ever use, donate them to a local quilting guild.

    I'm sure other people have more ideas.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  3. #3
    Kas
    Kas is offline
    Super Member Kas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Renton, WA
    Posts
    2,056
    Do you have access to the new house to measure your space? When I moved my sewing room into one of my older son's old rooms, I measured every wall, the opening of the closet, the depth of the walls of the closet, the height to the window, the height and width of the window, everything! Then I measured all of my bookshelf dimensions, the sewing table, ironing board, cutting table, even the sewing chair. Next, I drew the space to scale on graph paper. I also drew out all the furniture to scale and then cut it out. That let me play with placement to know what I wanted where. I also checked out a few books on organizing your sewing/crafting space. I got lots of good ideas there, too.
    Outside of a dog, a book is Man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.-Groucho Marx

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Chula Vista CA
    Posts
    6,582
    Those are great suggestions. I really like Kas's idea with making pieces to move about. But remember where you initially put things doesn't have to be permanent, that can reduce some of your stress. I have had the same sewing room for 10 years and still move things about from time to time. Enjoy the new space.

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    7,868
    Good suggestions above. I also suggest putting your machine in front of a window with a view, if possible. Consider whether you want a pressing station that you have to stand up and walk to, or if you'd rather pivot from your machine. Will you be purchasing any major new pieces? If so, making them match gives the room a more cohesive look. (My pieces are all white.) I use the rating system for my fabric (8,9,or 10 means I really like or love it. Keep only those except for practice pieces for FMQ. They can be ugly or outdated since they'll eventually be trashed). Keep your fabric away from natural light. Consider housing it in dressers if you're the type who is easily overstimulated by a lot of stuff. Can you easily reach the shelves you're planning to use, and can you keep them fairly orderly, or should you consider bookcases? I'm not sure how much space you have, so these suggestions are all just off the top of my head.

  6. #6
    Power Poster oksewglad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Between the dashes of a tombstone
    Posts
    11,388
    Blog Entries
    1
    Such great suggestions...I would add...think about the type of quilts you like and what you like to sew...Are you a scrap saver? Then by all means makes space for them...do you make your own precuts? Make space for sized bins. Many have benefited from Bonnie Hunter's system...

    http://quiltville.blogspot.com/2005/...rs-system.html

    Best of luck on this new space...you will love it...
    Don't worry spider.
    I keep house
    casually.
    ---Basho
    Nothing's too small...I love miniatures.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    1
    When I downsized I sold my excess fabric for $1.50 to 1.00 per yard and realized $900.00. I also sold some quilting books on Amazon and got $400.00 for those. My quilting club was thrilled to pay 1.50 yd. My local quilt show buys your fabric and resells it. So I would not give it away.

  8. #8
    Junior Member pahega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    242
    Blog Entries
    6
    This thread of posts is of high interest to me. I am in the very early stages of planning to build a new home. I will convert one bedroom into my sewing room and have done more thinking and planning for this room than for the rest of the house I had been watching and wanting a line of Martha Stewart's craft furniture but would not spend the money as i thought it was overpriced. As luck would have it, on Black Friday the whole line was 50% off with free shipping! I bought all of the pieces I wanted plus one more. I got the first shipment yesterday. Yes, I will have to move them, but it was a deal I couldn't pass up. The associate I spoke to on the phone said he had never seen them go on sale for this much. I will be following this thread for suggestions in setting up a sewing room.

  9. #9
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    35,083
    If your fabric isn't on small bolts already, do that and organize the bolts into colours. It will give you a better idea of what you have and the bolts will be ready to place into your wardrobes in your new space. I would not get rid of any fabric or tools until you unpack in your new sewing room. As you unpack, put away just what you want to keep and then get rid of the rest.

  10. #10
    Super Member Wanabee Quiltin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    St. Louis suburbs
    Posts
    6,085
    I just moved also and I pretty much kept my fabric the way it was. I keep FQ, charm square, and jelly rows separate from my stash. I keep my fabric divided by color, season or category like : dogs and cats, children, batiks etc. I keep all solids together in bins. I have a huge stash so it's in several rooms. I have two bookcases full of my books and another huge one full of magazines in the basement. Good Luck.

  11. #11
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    4,957
    I ruler fold my fabric -- eliminates the need to purchase comic boards which can take up a lot of room on your shelves!

  12. #12
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Upstate NY, north of Syracuse Area
    Posts
    6,087
    My sewing space is small, but packed with fabric and I have many little tricks to make things easier for myself. I use organizational tools and repurpose items to suit my purposes.
    I have a desk caddy converted into sewing tool caddy that sits to the right of my machine on my sewing desk. This holds all my scissors, rulers for marking fabrics, a cup for my smaller items, etc. Next to it sits a box of tissues and next to that a square metal basket with scrap paper for notes and math figuring, etc. This basket has a handle that folds down and will hold up the lid of my safety pin box when I need it to stay open during quilting so I can easily drop the pins in as I remove them. Before I figured out using the handle, the lid of the pin tin kept falling shut and slowing me down. LOL Little things make all the difference. My thread holder has a bobbin holder on it for the filled bobbins and my snips are attached to it by a ribbon, but I added a loop of elastic at the end for those times when the ribbon is just a bit too short. And now, when I drop the snips, I just grab the ribbon and tug them back up.
    I have a shelf with gallon size plastic bags that hold my scraplets by color. This makes for fast easy access for sorting and making string blocks. Just grab a bag or bags to work with the colors of choice.
    My cutting table is the top of a dresser I redid. My rulers are in the narrow top drawer. It sits in front of the window and also serves as my ironing station. On the window ledge I keep extra scissors in a cup; pens and pencils in another cup; a spray bottle on a candle holder for height; a cube of note paper.
    All of my fabric is sorted by color, including scraps, except for batiks and novelty, which are sorted by types. I also have bins for precuts.
    Linda Wedge White

    I believe UFOs are like scraps, ferns and dust bunnies. Once you get two, they send spores out into the air and more just happen anywhere the spores meet.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Sophie2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    968
    I recently moved and one thing I wish I had done when packing was list on the outside of the box just what was in it. I labeled everything "sewing room". I had time to sew before my studio was built and could not find my rotary cutter and a few other things. Thank goodness one of my new neighbors is a quilter and had extra supplies I could use. Good luck on your move and enjoy your new room!
    Sophie2

  14. #14
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    4,542
    Agree Sophie2, label your boxes very well -- I have boxes labeled fabric but not what kind and have had to rummage. Unfortunately, I was pretty ill when we moved so other folks helped me pack, so I have had to deal with things randomly packed. I noticed you don't have a closet -- that has been a savior for me as I had it fitted with drawers and shelves (and rods) that I use for my fat quarters and my rolled precuts. The shelves hold some of my batting (with other pieces of batting in bags on the floor in the linen closet and a storage closet). Since my sewing room will not hold all the fabric of my stash I have plastic bins of fabric in the garage. Most of my fabrics are ruler folded (I have some of the comic book boards, but they don't fit in the shelves my father made). I sort solids and tone on tone by color, then group by holiday, novelty, batik, fairy frost and Laurel Burch. I generally have the solids and batiks in the sewing room and the rest is in bins in the garage.

    One thing moving has allowed me to do is better organize my fabric and my tools -- I found most of the tools that I had put in a "safe" place so I had double and triples of some things. I have donated some the church quilting group and the rest I donated to Goodwill. I am also giving the church the larger pieces of fabric that I don't think I will ever use.
    QuiltnLady1

    When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

  15. #15
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine-ly Florida
    Posts
    3,881
    When we moved, I gave up a folding cutting table, a large quilt ruler rack, and a large task lamp. I don't miss the those things. One thing we did here in Florida was to install wall to wall cabinets in the spare room. We got them from IKEA and picked out white bead board doors. This has really helped with storage. I kept most of my yarn and fabric but purged my kid craft supplies from teaching.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Durango CO
    Posts
    934
    Don't take the smallest room for your sewing room. I wish I had taken the larger room when we moved. I can't get my husband to switch rooms now.

  17. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,119
    I used Creating your perfect quilting space by Hallock to help. She really has the ergonomics down and the book is very helpful for furniture placement. Well worth picking up if you are designing a new studio. I think you can find used copies. Good luck.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Davis, CA
    Posts
    79
    My suggestion is to put everything on wheels. That way you can easily re-organize down the road as your needs change of if for some reason you need to stash something behind something else and then need to find it again!

  19. #19
    Member SarahBethie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    90
    I would employ savvy storage solutions. Consider how the rest of the house is laid out. Bring your aesthetic into the space. I'm not a fan of most sewing furniture. You can get better quality second hand and repaint it to your specifications. Employing zones is a wise choice. Designating a specific area for sewing, quilting, cutting, etc will bring symmetry to the space. Most importantly, consider the necessity of breathing room and your specific creative nuances in turn. If you abhor clutter don't stuff it to the gills. If you're overwhelmed by visual stimuli then tuck the fabric away.

    Finally, make it yours. Decorate. Use attractive colors on the wall and decor. Be mindful of your lighting. Extra never hurts. And if you're inclined to be near a window consider the seasonal changes and make adjustments when the weather cools.

    If you're in need of ideas check out Where Women Create Magazine.

  20. #20
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Corpus Christi, Tx.
    Posts
    15,970
    Blog Entries
    3
    My room is set up so I do have to get up and move. Too much sitting can become a problem. My work stations are at different heights but comfortable. The comic book boards only take up as much space as they do in the package. They aren't that thick. If you use small cubicle spaces then you may consider measuring that space and fold accordingly. the idea of measuring your room and furniture and putting on graph paper is excellent. I have a very lit up room. It sees the morning light most of the day so most of my stash is stored in a huge cabinet my husband made. It's 6'x 3'x 2'. The shelving space is between 13" and 14 1/2" in height. I have easy access to everything and all is marked or visible because of the clear storage containers. When you go to the fabric shop and even WAlmart ask if you can have their leftover empty bolt boards. The less they have to carry back the happier they are. Therefore you can wrap the larger yardage.

  21. #21
    Super Member dungeonquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,031
    Thank you all for the great suggestions. My plan is to have my sewing table under the window (I will be in the basement), facing out into the room. I watch TV while sewing, so that will be on the other side of the room. I have two Ikea wardrobe, one double and one single, that I would like to put some of my fabric in, mostly the larger cuts. It is all in large and small totes at the moment, sorted by colour, batiks, Christmas, flannel, etc. The small bins, I mostly try to use for projects. The existing shelving will be used for the books and magazines I am keeping. I also have a large ironing board (2 feet by 4 feet), and plan to purchase a base unit of drawers for it to sit on. My cutting table is also quite large (will have to measure it), and is adjustable for height.
    I really like the idea of cutting out the sizes and shapes of what I have and playing with it. Great tip!

  22. #22
    Super Member dungeonquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,031
    Thank you all for the great suggestions. My plan is to have my sewing table under the window (I will be in the basement), facing out into the room. I watch TV while sewing, so that will be on the other side of the room. I have two Ikea wardrobe, one double and one single, that I would like to put some of my fabric in, mostly the larger cuts. It is all in large and small totes at the moment, sorted by colour, batiks, Christmas, flannel, etc. The small bins, I mostly try to use for projects. The existing shelving will be used for the books and magazines I am keeping. I also have a large ironing board (2 feet by 4 feet), and plan to purchase a base unit of drawers for it to sit on. My cutting table is also quite large (will have to measure it), and is adjustable for height.
    I really like the idea of cutting out the sizes and shapes of what I have and playing with it. Great tip!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.