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Thread: Crimson Tide quilt, w question about fleece backing

  1. #1
    Senior Member newestnana's Avatar
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    Crimson Tide quilt, w question about fleece backing

    Just completed this quilt top, which will be a Christmas gift. The second picture is the fleece I got to use as backing.

    Do you think it will be hard to work with the fleece? Any hints? Should I also use batting (seems pretty warm as is)?

    I can't imagine doing anything more than SITD, largely be ause I'm so unsure of working with the fleece.

    Btw, I also plan to do a quick turn rather than binding. This will hardly be an heirloom quilt, although it's going to a Fan.

    Your thoughts?
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    marcia

    To be a good sewer, you have to be a good ripper.

  2. #2
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    I love fleece as backing. It's very easy to work with. How warm do you want it to be? In the lap quilts I did I didn't use a batting. I have used fleece as a backing and as a batting (just not together). I enjoy working with it. Good luck. It will be a lovely quilt. BrendaK
    Be kind to yourself, by being kind to others. When you help others you help yourself.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Phyllis42's Avatar
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    I put on a fleece backing for a lap robe with W/N batting because it went to live in Montana. I STID only and still had lots of pleats on the back. My DSM has a short throat and it was very difficult.
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    Spray baste together. I also use a thin batting with fleece because the seems show thru the fleece after several washings. It is easy to work with. Just remember it has a lot of strech in one direction and not the other. Just be very aware of the strech. Good luck.

  5. #5
    Senior Member newestnana's Avatar
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    Hmmmm. I'm having more thoughts about this. If I don't use batting it wouldn't need much quilting and was even considering tying it instead. Or I thought I could FMQ one of those fancy A's in each of the white intersections.

    Then I read the suggestion about using batting to prevent the seams from showing through. Hmmm.
    marcia

    To be a good sewer, you have to be a good ripper.

  6. #6
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    Haven't work with fleece. You did a wonderful job!

  7. #7
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
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    I recently received a whole load of quilts for Project Linus and many had fleece backings which of course the kiddiewinks love.

    y personal preference is to use a thin wadding, one of my favourites is cotton "curtain interlining" sounds daft but it is super and cheap, a well known quilter told me about it.

    One of the quilters had done a lovely job of the quilting, hers had trains on it, so what she did was to to and ordinary stitch around the trains, checking the back often and then FMQ stippling all over the background, I don't know if you can see it clear enough in this pic but it works a treat. By sewing around the trains first she "set" the fleece in place, if you can understand what I mean!
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    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    i would just be sure to use a batting that isn't too thin, so the backing print doesn't show through to the front.

  9. #9
    Senior Member A1penny's Avatar
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    I'm always impressed with the great advice people give. Great quilt for a fan!

  10. #10
    Member outdoor_gal's Avatar
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    Nice! I am working on my 1st quilt and plan to do a fleece backing with a very thin batting so the fleece won't show through the lighter patches on my top. What is a "quick turn"?
    ~ Stephanie S

  11. #11
    Senior Member newestnana's Avatar
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    Quick turn is where you sew the backing to the quilt top (possibly also batting) right sides together and then turn it right side out. Stitch around the edges again to creat a little lift. No binding. There are other names for it (birthing?).
    marcia

    To be a good sewer, you have to be a good ripper.

  12. #12
    Member outdoor_gal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by newestnana View Post
    Quick turn is where you sew the backing to the quilt top (possibly also batting) right sides together and then turn it right side out. Stitch around the edges again to creat a little lift. No binding. There are other names for it (birthing?).
    Thanks
    ~ Stephanie S

  13. #13
    Super Member tealfalcon's Avatar
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    roll tide....I would use batting. ..we lived in Alabama and used quilts with batting and fleece a lot !!!!

  14. #14
    Super Member moreland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by newestnana View Post
    Hmmmm. I'm having more thoughts about this. If I don't use batting it wouldn't need much quilting and was even considering tying it instead. Or I thought I could FMQ one of those fancy A's in each of the white intersections.

    Then I read the suggestion about using batting to prevent the seams from showing through. Hmmm.
    From a lot of experience, I have found it really is important to find medium to heavy weight fleece. The very thin does really need a batting in addition to the backing, but the heavier fleece work beautifully without any batting. I, too, spray baste and then use only enough quilting to securely anchor the front and back together.
    God Bless,
    Rachel

  15. #15
    Junior Member Cindy2201's Avatar
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    Marsh, my friend and I did a HUGE quilt with a fleece backing on it. She also used a high loft poly batting. I was surprised at how easily it quilted but we did have it on the rack upstairs to do it. I'm sure she will love it, it turned out beautiful!

  16. #16
    Senior Member newestnana's Avatar
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    Update: I ended up not using batting, although in retrospect it probably would have given a nicer drape. Warmth was not a concern for the intended recipient.

    Because I was doing a quick turn, there was no opportunity to spray baste the layers, which would have stabilized the fleece. It came out okay nonetheless, and the recipient loved it. She is hoping it brings luck to Alabama this weekend!

    My favorite part of the quilt was the FMQ A's at the sashing intersections.

    Thank you all for your suggestions!


    Next time I use fleece backing I will layer it in the traditional way, with batting and spray basting and binding.
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    marcia

    To be a good sewer, you have to be a good ripper.

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