Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 36 of 36

Thread: Finally finished a tee shirt quilt...#1piecemaker, please read

  1. #26
    Debbie1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Roseburg, Oregon
    Posts
    2,279
    Great Job - if you say you had trouble, it doesn't show. Your daughter has to love her quilt!

  2. #27
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    SW Iowa
    Posts
    32,958
    Oh honey, it is beautiful. I made one for my daughter. ( I didn't even want her to join the sorority ) She loves it and shows it to anyone who comes over. I call it "the quilt from H***". The most important thing is she loves it. Yours is great.

  3. #28
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Port Angeles, WA
    Posts
    12,753
    I think it turned out great. I bet your daughter LOVED it

  4. #29
    Super Member omak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Central Washington State
    Posts
    6,053
    You have done a fine job on your tshirt quilt!
    I have found that I am the only one who knows where the weaknesses are in my quilts. Everyone else thinks they are perfect, so you be easier on yourself.
    Improving something is always an option, but good work is good work and you need to give yourself credit for having done what looks to me to be a very good job indeed!
    Next time
    your frustration may have come from the iron on batting, as you probably already know. A lightweight fusible interfacing would probably help you not have so many variables. And, for any considering using either product for the stabilizer on the tshirt fabric, always remember that interfacing, batting, has a give to it. By making sure that the "stretch" or "give" is always going the same direction, the quilt will hang differently.
    Although, I still think your quilt is just great!

  5. #30
    Junior Member OnTheGo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    271
    WOW! I didn't realize I had gotten the latest comments. We've been gone a month....was on 4 continents in a month...North America (of course), Europe, Africa and Asia.

    Met our daughter in Barcelona in early April and went on a 2 wk. Mediterranean cruise from there calling at ports in Italy, Greece, Turkey, Egypt and Malta. Was in Rome for Easter Sunday and stood in a crowd of hundreds of thousands in front of St. Peter's Basilica to hear Easter Services and the Pope came out on the balcony to bless the crowd.

    It was the first time to Egypt. We stayed in port overnight and had 2 full days giving us plenty of time to see the pyramids and the sphinx and take a dinner cruise on the Nile, visit the mosque of Mohammed Ali and watch a paper-making demonstration at the Papyrus Institute plus tour the cities of Cairo and Alexandria. Just glad the weather was mild...I was afraid it would already be really hot in the desert.

    Barcelona was one of my husband's favorite ports when he was in the Navy during the Korean war, so we stayed 3 nights there altogether. Loved walking the Las Ramblas.

    After the cruise, we went to Kazakhstan. I don't think I'm supposed to say where she's serving, but I don't know why. Everyone was so nice. We had a great time. We visited the orphanage. I had been sending beads and she took them one Sunday. I had expected they would have fun with them, but never dreamed of the intricate jewelry designs they made. More than a dozen of the teenage girls got into the floor and started turning out earrings, broaches, necklaces and bracelets as fast as they could. I was truly impressed.

    We visited a lot of historic things like the gulags where Stalin sent political prisoners and the mass graves. I went with Victoria to her Russian classes and to the English class she teaches at the halfway house. That's where some of the orphans live after they have to leave the orphanage after 9th grade. Some aren't so fortunate and are just let go to fend for themselves. All of these kids are so talented, but there are very few facilities to help them after they have to leave the orphanage. Just breaks my heart.

    Anyway, I saw a treadle machine at the halfway house. One of the girls who is 16, wants to be a fashion designer. She sews on the machine. Victoria said one night she was making a beaded costume for one of the other girls who was in a dance recital. She also crochets. The dream of all of them is to come to the United States. And Victoria's desire is to stay there. Go figure.

    I learn more if I listen to her answers to other people's questions. Someone asked her if she would be coming back to the states after her 5 yrs. are up and she said she hoped to be able to stay there. The kids depend on her now. She said they were very needy and clingy when she first arrived, but now they know they can depend on her so they're becoming more self-sufficient and she doesn't want to leave them.

    The ones who aren't lucky enough to get in a halfway house or trade school or aren't taken in by a family member, wind up on the streets. Aprox. 10% commit suicide the first year and the rest become prostitutes or drug dealers to survive.

    We took an overnight train to Almaty in the far south near the China and Kyrgyzstan borders. We stayed in a duplex on the grounds of "Teen Challenge", a rehab center for young males. They had also taken in some younger male kids that were living on the streets. The manager said there are some addicts as young as 8 yrs. old and some prostitutes as young as 10.

    The manager drove us around for a tour of the city and a trip into the Tein Shan Mtns. where the apple trees grow wild and they were in full bloom, as well as the wild tulips. There's a very good book about this country called "Apples Are From Kazakhstan" by Christopher Robbins.

    He also took us to his favorite Uighur restaurant. He said they weren't supposed to open for another hour, but he told us to wait in the jeep while he talked to them. He came back and told us to come on in. I guess they opened up just for us, because we were the oonly ones there for an hour. We ate with chopsticks and drank green tea with the meal. He is a descendant of the Uighur tribe of China.

    There are actually several tourists in Almaty, but it's not a touristy city. It is like a different country from Karaganda (where Victoria lives), though. It's green and has character and of course, the mountains. It has a population of 2 million according to our driver.

    She lives in a city of 1/2 a million, but it's on the steppe....nothing to break the wind...it's in southern Siberia. It's very much like the plains in the US. Their only trees are planted in the city, but there aren't any outside of town.

    It snowed twice after we arrived, but the trees & lilacs were sprouting buds by the time we left. The streets are one pothole after the other. The temps are sometimes 45 below zero F. And the summers are often over 100 F. She has moved into an apartment alone now and it's one of the very few that has A/C. The other 2 she has lived in did not.

    I'll put some pictures on here later if anyone is interested. It takes a long time for them to upload, so they may be few and far between.


  6. #31
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    16,675
    WOW! Great job!!

  7. #32
    Super Member sewsewquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Florida Keys
    Posts
    2,170
    Your trip sounds very interesting. If you post pictures on Picasa or one of those sites like it you could just post a link to it. Glad you got to see and spend time with your daughter.

  8. #33
    Junior Member OnTheGo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    271
    I'm just bumping this up from 3 or 4 yrs. ago. I haven't been on this site much in the last 2 yrs. until this past week and I was pleasantly surprised to find that it is now much easier to navigate and WOW, it has grown from about 2,000 members the best I remember to over 29,000. That's fantastic!

    At the time I posted this tee shirt quilt, I mentioned it was for our daughter who was moving to the other side of the world. Some of you asked where, and I had been instructed to not advertise the location. I think it is still not identified on the mission website, but they all post to Facebook, so how much more public can it get?
    She lives in Kazakhstan ( Borat's imaginary country), but there's nothing imaginary about it. It's a real place with real people although, it's a half century behind the rest of the world. We visited her there.

    She teaches English as a second language and works with about 300 orphans at one children's home and close to 100 babies at a baby house and also does some volunteer work at a house for kids at risk in a poor neighborhood.

    This is in the region of southern Siberia in central Asia and was part of the Old Soviet Union. The word, Siberia, is enough to tell you that the winters are brutal with possible temps dropping to 45 below zero and the ground is covered with ice from Nov. til the spring thaw in April. BUT, she began calling this land home almost immediately.
    Nothing ever works all at once...i.e., the heat or the water or power will go off without warning or the lift will be out and she lives on the 5th floor and her clothes dryer is on its' last leg, but she cannot find a dryer in the stores...the Americans are the only ones who use them, so they are not stocked and hers is one of the oldest in the country. Sliced bread only came to stores since she moved there.
    They shop outdoors in bazaars all winter and at times the vendors have to use hair blow dryers to keep their produce and their hands from freezing. She literally bought snow boots in the snow.

    She now has a family of six siblings who consider her their mother. Seven siblings were dropped off at the orphanage nearly 10 yrs. ago. The oldest is now deceased, and 2 are still living at the home, but the older ones who have been released from the home at 16 or after 9th grade are either enrolled in a school with a dorm or working. They visit with our daughter on weekends and the 19 yr. old girl lived with her last summer while she did an apprenticeship in the city. They range in age from 11-22.

    I sent the red tee's & plaids for a family portrait, but they haven't all gotten together at the same time yet. This was made at the orphanage on New Yr's eve. These are 4 of the siblings...2 boys aren't there...
    Name:  Attachment-197981.jpe
Views: 10
Size:  33.3 KB

  9. #34
    Super Member babyboomerquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,732
    Blog Entries
    3
    A really awesome quilt!She will love it forever!

  10. #35
    Super Member hairquilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    1,655
    Blog Entries
    2
    I made that same statement after I finished my one & only t-shirt quilt. Never again, but yours looks great & your daughter will cherish it!!

  11. #36
    Super Member susie0808's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Long Island N.Y.
    Posts
    1,806
    The quilt you made your daughter is precious. It is beautiful and a treasured gift your daughter loves!

    Love the story of how dd came to love her surroundings. She is doing remarkable work. And I'm sure she's made a huge impact on these kids lives. I can understand why she loves her work. It's very rewarding for her. Your raised her right! Great job mom and dad!

    I'm glad you were able to visit her and take advantage of seeing other locations as well. You painted a beautiful portrait of the other countries that most people only dream about visiting. Well done.

    Glad you decided to visit us again. And update as well.

    Sue

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.