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Thread: On bag of sugar from HyVee

  1. #26
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    I am an avid label reader and have learned what most of the tricks are. I stick to as few ingredient as possible on the label. I won't buy grown in Mexico food or pet food manufactured in China.

    My DD had a college friend that was vegan and gluten free and all her food had to be organic and nothing with a face being a part of it. I thought she was recovering from an illness when I first met her. She didn't know that organic growers at the farmer's market used animal manure as fertilizer. She tried to get others to protest that and make a scene over it. My DD distanced herself from her and I was curious to what the sad girl ever found to eat
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  2. #27
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptquilts View Post
    Right. You could eat all natural, organic whole wheat and you would get tons of gluten. I never heard of it being an additive, except maybe for high-gluten flour.
    Though by eating that natural, organic whole wheat, you would not be
    eating any more gluten than if you ate non-organic whole wheat.

    Organic has nothing to do with gluten and vice-verse!

    When reading products labels you can often find gluten-containing ingredients
    in foods that you would not expect to have grains in .....

    BearIsGray's link gives a good explanation about gluten.
    ... as well as as an overview as to where one may find gluten that they would not expect.
    For example, food colouring was a total surprise!!

    Like who would ever have thought that?
    Well, at least not me!
    Last edited by QuiltE; 09-02-2019 at 09:15 AM.
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  3. #28
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    Even in foods that do not naturally contain gluten, people who are very sensitive to it need to look for the GF label, to make sure there is not cross-contamination in the manufacturing and packaging. For instance, Cheerios have the GF label, store brand "toasty-o's" do not.

  4. #29
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    I work in a supermarket deli; all of our lunchmeat and cheeses are gluten free, but marketed in different ways.

    the name brand hams and turkeys come in with the name of the company and 99% fat free and gluten free already printed on the wrapper. the gluten free part is about the size of my house key.

    the store brand hams and turkeys come in with a plain clear wrapper. Interestingly, they are also a name brand meat, just seasoned to our chain's individual specifications. We have a big roll of stickers with our store name on it, plus the words gluten free. the sticker is about the size of my hand. We don't have always have the stickers to put on the store brand meats, but you would be surprised at how many more customers buy the store brand 'because it's gluten free' when we have and use them. these are the same customers who refuse to buy anything but the name brand lunchmeats when we don't use the giant gluten free store brand stickers.

    I am not sure how many people are very educated about what gluten-free is by their buying habits. I think they mostly know that there is a diet thing going around about gluten, and it is a snap decision to be a little more healthy. I only have a handful of customers with actual gluten allergies, and they always make sure to educate themselves on how we slice and handle our products before they buy anything. In fact, I have one customer who is so sensitive to gluten they cannot buy our lunchmeats because we share prep areas and a kitchen with the bakery, and don't have separate sinks, etcs.

  5. #30
    Super Member Sandygirl's Avatar
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    Remember “ one size fits all” clothing labels?

    Now they read “one size fits most”.
    Sandygirl

    Janome 9900 / Janome 9700 / Janome 3160 QVC/ Janome 1100D serger, Juki 2020 Mini
    Singer Centennial model (inherited from my late, fav aunt!)

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandygirl View Post
    Remember “ one size fits all” clothing labels?

    Now they read “one size fits most”.
    I remember those labels -

  7. #32
    Super Member SusieQOH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    I am an avid label reader and have learned what most of the tricks are. I stick to as few ingredient as possible on the label. I won't buy grown in Mexico food or pet food manufactured in China.

    My DD had a college friend that was vegan and gluten free and all her food had to be organic and nothing with a face being a part of it. I thought she was recovering from an illness when I first met her. She didn't know that organic growers at the farmer's market used animal manure as fertilizer. She tried to get others to protest that and make a scene over it. My DD distanced herself from her and I was curious to what the sad girl ever found to eat
    That's about the craziest thing I've heard! Animal manure is very "natural"- nothing my 2 vegetarian sons would object to! And they know a lot about it. They are two of the healthiest people I know. It's been so long since they've eaten meat that I can't even remember when they started being vegetarian.
    Last edited by SusieQOH; 09-10-2019 at 05:05 AM.

  8. #33
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    yes, but if plants are fertilized with manure from animals that ate non-organic feed, is the manure (and plants) still organic?

  9. #34
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    We each have reasons (or not) on why we do things. My son is vegan and has cut out honey because it is made by bees -- well, so is almost every piece of fruit you eat as well as many vegetables are pollinated by bees. Even having been a vegetarian myself I never understood the bee thing, but I know it is a thing.

    There are (of course!) standards on what makes things organic. It is my understanding that non-processed/composted manure is considered organic if there are no additives and that it does not matter what the feed or antibiotics that the animal is treated with, only what the manure is treated with after it is produced. It's one of those areas that causes concerns because things like sewage sludge waste products (which have been sterilized) can be used despite mineral and other contamination.

    Today is Farmer's Market day. I'll chat with a couple of the vendors. I know we have organic, regular, and "transitional" farms represented. Transitional is the period they have to go through before they can be certified as organic even if they have grown the crops organically on fresh ground.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shoofly1 View Post
    Labels are an interesting conversation. Here is something you never see on labels and it's pretty scary: https://www.biosludge.news/
    I read through a few articles there; that site contains a *lot* of misinformation. There is also some good, accurate information, but I hate it when sites treat science and conspiracy as being equal.

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