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Thread: Don't use the wrong oranges for marmalade!

  1. #1
    Muv
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    Don't use the wrong oranges for marmalade!

    If you have watched my Youtube video showing how to make marmalade and want to have a go, make sure you use Seville oranges. Please read these two threads, and all the links, for information about oranges.

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/recipes...s-t174228.html

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/recipes...e-t174337.html

    Also look at this:-

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitter_orange

    From what I gather, you are more likely to be able to get Seville oranges in Canada than in the USA.

    Don't let this stop you watching the video, because the next recipe I intend to put on Youtube will be a red grapefruit marmalade - the method is very similar, and you will have no trouble getting hold of the right fruit!

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    Super Member Murphy1's Avatar
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    What is your opinion of using kumquats instead of Sevilles? In California they are fairly easy to obtain.
    Murphy1
    For our wonderful Golden Retriever adopted in March of 2010.

  3. #3
    Muv
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    Hello Murphy1,
    I knew I would get interesting replies from California or Florida.
    I've never eaten kumquats. They are sold in tiny little punnets here and are outrageously expensive. I've just looked them up on wikipedia and am intrigued. Do you get the round ones or the oval ones, and are they sweet skinned with a sour middle?

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    Super Member Murphy1's Avatar
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    Mine are oval and they are very sour but do have a sweet skin. When I was a kid I use to eat the peel and leave the fruit. I have such fond memories of them that I bought one a few years ago and put it in a small orange pot. I now just go out and pop them in my mouth when they are ripe, and do eat the whole fruit not just the skin.

    Nancy aka Murphy1
    Quote Originally Posted by Muv View Post
    Hello Murphy1,
    I knew I would get interesting replies from California or Florida.
    I've never eaten kumquats. They are sold in tiny little punnets here and are outrageously expensive. I've just looked them up on wikipedia and am intrigued. Do you get the round ones or the oval ones, and are they sweet skinned with a sour middle?
    Murphy1
    For our wonderful Golden Retriever adopted in March of 2010.

  5. #5
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
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    My mom says the same thing about an orange pie recipe she had from Florida, the oranges we get here do not work.

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    most of the other recipes on yutube call for the addition of lemons..i wonder do they contain more pectin?

  7. #7
    Muv
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steady Stiching View Post
    most of the other recipes on yutube call for the addition of lemons..i wonder do they contain more pectin?
    Marmalade recipes are all about balance, getting the amounts of acid, pectin, sugar and liquid just right.
    Seville oranges are high in pectin and very bitter, so you only need one lemon to about 2lbs of oranges. With sweet oranges you need more lemons for both the pectin and the acid.

    You have got my cogs whirring, ladies! I made a batch of marmalade last night using white grapefruit and will be trying it on toast this morning. If it passes the test it will be going on Youtube fairly soon.

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    I haven't seen your videos or anything yet but just wanted to throw in a bit of info. I haven't made orange marmalade in years - I use tangerines. Have you ever tried them? Yum. Might be something you'd like to play with. I like the idea of the grapefruits being used.

  9. #9
    Super Member psychonurse's Avatar
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    forget the white grapefruit, go with Ruby Reds. yum. A Fl native. now living elsewhere.

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    Senior Member imdelagarza62's Avatar
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    These sound like the oranges that grow in everyone's yard in South Texas. They look so pretty and smell really good,but when you open one to taste,,ugh.

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    Those Texas Ruby Reds are wonderful and in season now. Love them!

  12. #12
    Muv
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steady Stiching View Post
    Those Texas Ruby Reds are wonderful and in season now. Love them!
    I've got it cracked with the ruby reds - that will be the next marmalade to go up on Youtube. Also the white grapefruit marmalade I made last night tastes really nice, so that will go up also.

    Scakes - I've used clementines before now in a mixed fruit marmalade.

    Imdelagarza62 - oh gosh, have you hit the jackpot? If they have a short season (that is, now) and are packed with pips, try cooking one. If the pith turns colourless after a long slow simmer the odds are that you have a Seville orange. It could be that the trees are descended from old root stock, and the Spaniards were in Texas... If you have Seville oranges growing near you I am green and writhing with envy!

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    Senior Member LUANNH's Avatar
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    Here in Florida we have a very sour orange called calamunda (sp not sure of) but makes wonderful marmalade. You deseed the fruit and chop the whole thing up for the marmalade, no waste. I even chop it finer in a blender and make a cake with the pulp and a glaze, it's yummy. LuAnn
    It's always sunny here in Fl unless it's raining,LOL

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    Senior Member ncredbird's Avatar
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    We lived in Phoenix, AZ for 22 years and the city is full of orange trees planted in public areas. These are the Seville oranges that are used in making marmalade. They have to be picked up by the maintenance workers because they are not fit to eat fresh. I often wondered why they wouldn't have planted juice or navel oranges instead as people would have been glad to have them. I always had a great supply source for making marmalade and often used the zest from these oranges in my baking.

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    Super Member rexie's Avatar
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    Do you have your grapefruit marmalade recipe up anywhere? I don't like grapefruit, but this might be a way of getting to eat it.

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    Senior Member BARES's Avatar
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    Don't use the wrong oranges for marmalade!

    Quote Originally Posted by Muv View Post
    Hello Murphy1,
    I knew I would get interesting replies from California or Florida.
    I've never eaten kumquats. They are sold in tiny little punnets here and are outrageously expensive. I've just looked them up on wikipedia and am intrigued. Do you get the round ones or the oval ones, and are they sweet skinned with a sour middle?
    I am wondering if the round ones that you are referring to are Loquats. Kumquats look like small oval oranges. Loquats are more tear drop like, very heavy and round on the bottom. They have about 5 - 6 large seeds. They are sweet, not sugary so, tho. I don't know if they would make good marmalade or not but they don't seem like the type of fruit.

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    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
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    Interesting discussion and couldn't help but chip in (I only ever eat homemade jams and generally only marmalades). Luannh, you might mean "Calamondin" it looks like a citrus (but I believe it is really another genus). Calamondins are terribly bitter (not like Cumquats at all even with the skin on). I am a keen fruit grower, mainly citrus and make marmalades out of all of them.

    We have Calamondin, Clementine, Mandarin, Lemon, Lime, Nagami Cumquat (those are the beautiful oval ones) and a very old Valencia Orange. Valencia's may be a suitable substitute for Seville, they dont have quite as many pips but are very high in pectin and when overipe make beautiful (but tart) orange juice. I never add pectin to any of my fruits and so far have met with good success.

    Love your Youtube vids Muv.....Mum and I have almost lost our "English voices"....Gosh if I went back to Devon they'd call me a foreigner

  18. #18
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
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    Interesting discussion and couldn't help but chip in (I only ever eat homemade jams and generally only marmalades). Luannh, you might mean "Calamondin" it looks like a citrus (but I believe it is really another genus). Calamondins are terribly bitter (not like Cumquats at all even with the skin on). I am a keen fruit grower, mainly citrus and make marmalades out of all of them.

    We have Calamondin, Clementine, Mandarin, Lemon, Lime, Nagami Cumquat (those are the beautiful oval ones) and a very old Valencia Orange. Valencia's may be a suitable substitute for Seville, they dont have quite as many pips but are very high in pectin and when overipe make beautiful (but tart) orange juice. I never add pectin to any of my fruits and so far have met with good success.

    Love your Youtube vids Muv.....Mum and I have almost lost our "English voices"....Gosh if I went back to Devon they'd call me a foreigner

  19. #19
    Muv
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    Hello Earthwalker,

    I would have a field day at your place with all the fruit! Truly a transplanted Devonian.

    No, I never add pectin either. In fact, I've never seen it on sale.

    At the moment I am stuffing the freezer with the Sevilles before they go out of season. Also I am lurking around the shops waiting for the first blood oranges to appear.

    It has been fascinating finding out who can get what fruit where. I've finally got the grapefruit video done so I'm hoping to hear from people when they have tried it.

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