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Thread: I am looking for some old recipes

  1. #51
    Super Member Psychomomquilter's Avatar
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    this was very interesting, I thoroughly enjoyed this sharing, I got the thought because of the times today, need to strretch that dollar, conserve and cut back. So my thought is toi see if what they did back then, maybe I should try and see ifd I can do it too. I will cjheck those links, I forgot about Fanny Farmer, Just something for me to check out. again I hope all of you enjoyed this as much as I did.
    we don't meet people by accident.Everyone is meant to cross our path for a reason.

  2. #52
    Super Member Psychomomquilter's Avatar
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    I used to do the baking soda and salt! as for the spam, that might have been all they could afford at that time unless they raised their chickens, pigs, cows ect. I know they had victory gardens, was always talked about when I was a child. I think my aunts had a bunch of canned veggies in the cellar! and I do remember some good eating.

    here is one, a child hood memory, boiled chicken feet, with dumplings. I only mentioned this one, because I seen some in the grocery store the other day! can we say yuck?? well what about pigs feet, or beef tongue?? yuck and yuck, and I could name some other parts of the animals which I won't here. and people ate that stuff back then, besides spam!

    So that hamburger, or pork chop does look good, huh?
    we don't meet people by accident.Everyone is meant to cross our path for a reason.

  3. #53
    Super Member Psychomomquilter's Avatar
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    I got a bunch of recipes , thanks for the infoi!!
    we don't meet people by accident.Everyone is meant to cross our path for a reason.

  4. #54
    Super Member Treasureit's Avatar
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    My mother used to make Spaetzles (sp?) and Lentils. This has been one of our families favorites also. I make the lentils pretty much according to the bag's directions..maybe more onions sometimes garlic and have also added tomatoes. The spaezles are easy but take a while. We made them for a lot of people usually - 5-6 I guess. It a BIG bowl mix flour (about 6-8 cups) add 4-5 eggs, and milk to make a thick heavy batter. Batter will be very hard to stir.

    We had a spaetzle board that was wooden with the end taperd down to the edge. Put a glob of batter on the board (or on the back of a smooth plate) and take a dinner knife and cut off small pieces into boiling water. They cook fast...as soon as they float take out of water with a slotted spoon and put on plate. Note..the more eggs you use the heavier they are, so for lighter ones use less egg and a little more milk.

    This recipe cost nearly nothing and feeds a lot. We would put the spaetzles on our dinner plate and cover with lentils...MMMMMMMMMM good. ps...they also are very good for constipation...lol

  5. #55
    Super Member quiltymom's Avatar
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    My mom always breaded then fried it til golden brown. So Good!!!
    You know if your a quilter when you cleanup your sewing room and your family thinks your moving out!! Author U/K Sue

  6. #56
    Super Member Psychomomquilter's Avatar
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    Hey quilty mom, I think I do remember that one!
    we don't meet people by accident.Everyone is meant to cross our path for a reason.

  7. #57
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treasureit View Post
    My mother used to make Spaetzles (sp?) and Lentils. This has been one of our families favorites also. I make the lentils pretty much according to the bag's directions..maybe more onions sometimes garlic and have also added tomatoes. The spaezles are easy but take a while. We made them for a lot of people usually - 5-6 I guess. It a BIG bowl mix flour (about 6-8 cups) add 4-5 eggs, and milk to make a thick heavy batter. Batter will be very hard to stir.

    We had a spaetzle board that was wooden with the end taperd down to the edge. Put a glob of batter on the board (or on the back of a smooth plate) and take a dinner knife and cut off small pieces into boiling water. They cook fast...as soon as they float take out of water with a slotted spoon and put on plate. Note..the more eggs you use the heavier they are, so for lighter ones use less egg and a little more milk.

    This recipe cost nearly nothing and feeds a lot. We would put the spaetzles on our dinner plate and cover with lentils...MMMMMMMMMM good. ps...they also are very good for constipation...lol
    Is that kind of like a quick noodle? So, you could put a sauce over it?

    Linda

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  8. #58
    Super Member 4EVERquilt's Avatar
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    Spam... Is used very widely in Hawaii/Guam and some of the other pacific islands. I grew up on something called commodity meat. It was very similar to spam. We fixed it all kinds of ways.. frying it with potatoes/eating it on a fresh flower tortilla. Today I still eat spam and fix it the same way. I lived in Hawaii in the 70's, we were military and we fixed spam with white rice. My sister-in-law who is from Hawaii still makes fried rice with spam.
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  9. #59
    Super Member 4EVERquilt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosyjo View Post
    Back in the fifties my dad was in the service and his pay didn't reach mom by Thanksgiving so she took SPAM and shaped a turkey out of it and then went to the bedroom and cried. Us kids thought she was pretty inventive. Jo
    I think your mom was not only an inventive women....she was a women indeed!! Giving her children the memory you just shared with us.
    will quilt 4EVER

  10. #60
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    I keep SPAM on my emergency food storage shelf with other canned meats that go with the dried/canned beans and rice. I started keeping emergency foods on hand because of unforeseen events such as power outages. I was home alone and power was out for almost a day due to a grid outage- prompted me to buy more "unscented candles", check battery supplies and update emergency supply backpack. In that backpack are first aid supplies,ponchos, crank lanterns and emergency radio. It is stored with tent, large moving quilt and other type supplies. I hope nothing every happens but it is best to stay prepared. Especially water and canned fruits can keep you hydrated. Some folks ask if I throw out my emergency food stuff-nope. I only keep things that I can incorporate into our regular menus. So SPAM gets diced and put in scrambled eggs, onions and pepper wraps for breakfast or into potato or mac and cheese casseroles. FYI - SPAM comes in many flavors now-http://www.spam.com/varieties

  11. #61
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    A delicious Spam recipe: Slice spam thinly and fry. Make toast. Mix and heat one can whole kernel corn and one can cream style corn. To serve....put one slice bread on plate. Arrange two slices of fried spam over toast. Ladel a generous portion of hot corn over the spam. Cut into fork sized pieces. Absolutely delicious. My family has never heard of anyone else eating this, but its one of our favorites.
    Cjones

  12. #62
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    thanks for the recipe

    Quote Originally Posted by TShooters View Post
    When Mom died, she still had all the ration books for her 3 older children, Dad, his Mom and Dad, and one of Dad's brothers. They all lived together during WWII. They gave up the car during the war, and Dad never had another one.
    My brother (15 yrs older than I) loved her butter rolls and he'd have one for lunch at school in his lunch pail (syrup bucket). It was homemade biscuit dough fried in a cast iron skillet like a fried pie, with a dollop of butter and sprinkle of suger inside.

    Most of Mom's recipes and canning recipes listed ingredients only. No instructions.

    Here's a banana nut cake that I remember with fondness. The "filling" was more of a glaze made in the cast iron skillet.

    1 1/2 cup flour
    1 cup white sugar
    3/4 cup brown sugar
    3 T. sweet milk
    1/2 cup shortening
    2 bananas, crushed with fork
    1 t. soda
    1/2 t. salt
    1 t. vanilla
    1 cup crushed pecans
    2 eggs

    Blend sugars and shortening. Add eggs, milk, and sifted flour, soda, and salt. Put in crushed bananas and pecans. Put in moderate oven to cook.

    Filling:
    1/2 cup brown sugar
    1/2 cup white sugar
    3/4 cup canned milk
    pinch salt
    few drops vanilla
    Cook 1 minute. Thicken with powdered sugar and spread on cake. Put pecans on, if desired.
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  13. #63
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  14. #64
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    We certainly didn't have much growing up, but canned a lot of our own food. Breakfast was usually peanut butter toast, or my Dad's favorites were milk toast (buttered toast dampened in hot milk) or milk crackers (crumbled saltines and sugar in cold milk). I wasn't a big fan of shredded wheat. Then of course were the many critter meals- hunting was the only way to stretch the budget for 8, and my German GrandFather was a great hunter. Snapping turtle-woodchuck-squirrel-rabbit-raccoon stews. I had a hard time with raising our own poultry to eat. Don't forget the good old pressure cooker meals! I still remember Mom helping a neighbor clean up after the top blew off hers. And lots of Jello salads. I still have some boxes of Mom's old cookbooks- Rumford was a favorite. Spam- I refused to eat it.

  15. #65
    Super Member kathdavis's Avatar
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    Spam is now very expensive per pound compared to hamburger, chicken, etc. It used to be very cheap when I was a kid.
    Kathleen

    Remember, people will see your quilts long after you are gone....NOT your housework!

  16. #66
    Super Member katesnanna's Avatar
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    I have never eaten Spam even though it is available here in Australia. My mum used to buy a canned meat called Camp Pie. We ate it with salad or on sandwiches. I remember we liked it but I haven't eaten it since I was kid. Mum was a brilliant cook, had the knack to make any type of pastry and made cakes & biscuits (cookies) every weekend. When I think of all the sugar we consumed not to mention butter we all should have been obese but with no TV, X Box, DS or computer we were outside most of the time and walked or ran everywhere.
    Aaaahhh!! the good old days.

  17. #67
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    When I was growing up; we also had the commodity meat[ looks like Spam, from the government, for low income families].
    I used to make a Spanish Rice recipe and add the Spam lookalike meat to that.
    Also would make Pizza burgers with it.
    1can Spam- ground up using the old box grater
    1 lb hamburger
    1 small onion, chopped/grated
    1 can tomato soup
    pizza spices[oregano, parsley, thyme,garlic powder-whatever you like, as desired]
    open face hamburger buns


    Fry hamburger, onions, spam- until brown
    Add tomato soup , spices.Heat through. Spead buns with meat mixture.Sprinkle cheese over top. Bake in 350 f oven until browned. About 1/2 hour.
    Could have added green peppers[cooked along with the meat mixture] and also mushrooms.




    REALLY DIDN'T HAVE PRINTED OUT RECIPES FOR THESE TWO FOODS BUT THEY SURE TASTED WONDERFUL AS TEENAGER.

  18. #68
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    Spam Museum in Minneapolis.

  19. #69
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    I remember growing up rural and Grandpa ran the General Store in town too. We ate from the garden, chickens, hogs, and all kinds of jellies! Canning all summer with the heat cooking us too! Grandma made plenty of potatoes - fried with sausage and eggs in the morning, boiled, often cold, with sandwiches for lunch, and mashed with meat for supper. Also noodles with stewed tomatoes, plenty of soups to use the last bits of corn etc. Coffee cakes were baked every Saturday with wonderful spices. Bread on the wood stove gave a heavenly smell when coming in from the cold snow.

    As for recipes I always liked Shepherds Pie. Easy just brown hamburger, add assorted veggies and tomato base (I now use soup and sometimes mushroom), put into casserole dish, top with mashed potatoes and bake about a half hour til hot. Add a cucumber salad - cukes sliced thin with onions in a sweet sour sauce, homemade bread with mulberry jelly, and pie for desert. Ah, memories.

  20. #70
    Super Member Latrinka's Avatar
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    My DH liked spam, slice, fry, eat with fried eggs or make a sandwich.
    If a woman's work is never done....why start?

  21. #71
    Senior Member lynndianne's Avatar
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    Am I the only one who things Spam is just toooooo salty? My husband bought a can (as a joke) and we tried it...but I ate one small slice and the rest went in the trash.

    Lynn
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  22. #72
    Senior Member lynndianne's Avatar
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    sorry for the misspelling of thinks. I tried to correct it before the message went through...

    Lynn
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  23. #73
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    Reading through this reminds me of being a kid at family gatherings and asking about the keepsakes in a box that would find their way out to where I was with the oldest relatives. I learned that our families were lucky enough to be able to barter for gas or rides to get to grandparents' farm at least once a month if not once a week. Milk, eggs, fresh fruit and vegies. In other words, they had survived crossing the ocean and starting over in 1850s on one branch; had dug deep and pioneered on three others. They raised families and helped neighbors during the Great Depression of the thirties so a little hardship in getting manufactured goods could be lived with. Royal Baking Powder had a recipe book that dealt with the basics of biscuits and cakes etc from the twenties. The Household Search Light Cookbooks were like the America's Test Kitchen of today. Basics were taught at grandma's or mom's elbow --- the joy of cooking a full meal with Grandma sitting in place and letting me run the cookstove (wood fired) to do Sunday dinner in the early sixties was great. I even learned how to make a smooth, thin gravy for the roast beef. During the second world war Grandma didn't do as much cookie baking as she did when I arrived in the fifties. Perhaps they should've continued rationing sugar and flour??
    WilliP

  24. #74
    Member VaughnVinn's Avatar
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    Well said! Can't express in words how we used to enjoy cooking with Grandama. Her little tips and the way she used to add herbs to and all ingredients to recipe was all perfect.
    Experts agree that cheap cabinets can save up to 50% of your kitchen budget

  25. #75
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    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by Psychomomquilter View Post
    I am looking for some of our grand mas recipes, maybe ggreatgrandmas, 1940's era
    something they cooked for a meal. I have been doing some research on this era. It is sooo amazing what they had to use, get by on and so on, and we complain if we don't have things in our cupboards!

    what to fix for supper? SPAM, any recipes for it? old fashioned home made biscuits? chicken pot pie? rationing this stuff, even children had rationing booklets. coffee and tea? sugar?

    oopps sorry going on a tangent there.
    But was and am curious how foods were prepared with the little they had. any thoughts on this? oh, any recipes on this?


    Ice Box Molasses Cookies My Grandma made these often: 1 cup EACH shortening, molasses, brown sugar, 1 egg, 4 cups flour, 1 teas. EACH salt, soda, ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves. Boil together shortening, molasses and brown sugar over low heat til boiling. Remove and let cool to luke-warm, add egg and mix well, sift together flour and spices, add and mix well. Pack tightly into greased pan and cover tightly. (I roll into a long coil in wax-paper) Chill in ice box several hours or overnight, Slice thin on greased baking sheet. Bake at 350( or when she said the wood stove was hot enough) for 15 minutes. Makes about 10 dozen. Delicious!

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