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Thread: Making Mitered Corners on a Hemmed Quilt

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    Making Mitered Corners on a Hemmed Quilt

    Picture 1: Shows lining up the 45 degree line on the top edge of the pieced top. The cutting edge of the ruler is extended 1/4" past the point of the top (seam allowance). I like to trim my backing fabric 2" from pieced top for a nice size/full hem.

    Picture 2: What it looks like after slicing off the corner. Practice on some scraps first just so you don't get nervous!

    Picture3: Fold backing fabric lining up cut edge with corner of pieced top on the fold. Place a pin in the middle. Now stitch from folded corner to the pin. Clip corner.

    Picture 4: Turn corner right side out. I just use my finger to "pop" the corner. If needed, finger press seam open.

    Picture 5: Sides folded under and pinned. Ready to be stitched down. When I do a hemmed quilt, I machine stitch down the hem. This would also look nice with a decorative stitch.

    Picture 6: This is a picture of a Log Cabin quilt I did about 5 years ago. As you can see, the seam is still holding up. And it's nice and flat - no bulk.
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  2. #2
    Izy
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    Fabulous Tute thanks!
    It's quarter to me time!!

    Izy

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    You're welcome Izy!

    Just had a question about this being binding. It's not binding, the red fabric is the backing fabric. After it's trimmed to twice what you would like your hem to be, then the corner is sliced off. I like a one inch hem that's why I trimmed to two inches. When tucked under it gives a nice full hem. If you want a 1 1/2" hem, then you would trim to three inches all the way around the quilt. This is a lot faster and less work than binding. Doubt you could use this method for a quilt that you want to enter into a contest. But, it's really durable for a kids quilt that is used and abused alot.

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    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    thanks for the tut
    Nancy in western NY
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    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
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    Now, this is REALLY COOL!!!!!.

    When you say hemmed quilt, are you referring to bringing the backing fabric to the front for the binding?

    It couldn't be any easier. Now I have to go try this.

    Thanks for the tute!
    peace
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    You're welcome ladies!

    ube: "When you say hemmed quilt, are you referring to bringing the backing fabric to the front for the binding?" Yes - and it is easy. But, make sure you practice on some scrap fabric first to get your measurements the way you want them.

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    Senior Member Old_Rosebud's Avatar
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    Thanks! Even this newbie could understand perfectly!

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    BCM
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    Thank you. The instructions are clearly written, but the addition of the pictures make it a tutorial that is very understandable to me.

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    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tute!!
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    Senior Member Loretta's Avatar
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    WOW! After struggling on mitered borders this brings it right home. Thank you.
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    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlienQuilter View Post
    You're welcome ladies!

    ube: "When you say hemmed quilt, are you referring to bringing the backing fabric to the front for the binding?" Yes - and it is easy. But, make sure you practice on some scrap fabric first to get your measurements the way you want them.
    Thanks so much AQ. I can't wait to try it!
    peace
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    Senior Member sonisew's Avatar
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    Nice tute thanks!
    SoniSew

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    Power Poster twinkie's Avatar
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    great tute. Thanks.

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    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
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    Great tute. I have avoided that kind of finish because it looked so difficult. thanx for making it look doable.

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    hemmed quilt

    Quote Originally Posted by AlienQuilter View Post
    Picture 1: Shows lining up the 45 degree line on the top edge of the pieced top. The cutting edge of the ruler is extended 1/4" past the point of the top (seam allowance). I like to trim my backing fabric 2" from pieced top for a nice size/full hem.

    Picture 2: What it looks like after slicing off the corner. Practice on some scraps first just so you don't get nervous!

    Picture3: Fold backing fabric lining up cut edge with corner of pieced top on the fold. Place a pin in the middle. Now stitch from folded corner to the pin. Clip corner.

    Picture 4: Turn corner right side out. I just use my finger to "pop" the corner. If needed, finger press seam open.

    Picture 5: Sides folded under and pinned. Ready to be stitched down. When I do a hemmed quilt, I machine stitch down the hem. This would also look nice with a decorative stitch.

    Picture 6: This is a picture of a Log Cabin quilt I did about 5 years ago. As you can see, the seam is still holding up. And it's nice and flat - no bulk.
    can you tell me where I can get the easy rule from? great tut thanks
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    Quote Originally Posted by barbrose View Post
    can you tell me where I can get the easy rule from? great tut thanks
    I honestly don't remember where I bought that ruler. All you need is a long ruler that has a 45 degree line on it.

    A 6 1/2" square up ruler is not long enough. You need one with a nice long side for cutting off the corner. The ruler above is 6 1/2" X 13". A 6" X 24" ruler would also work if it has a 45 degree line on it.

    I'm glad everyone likes the tutorial. Once you get the hang of it, it goes really fast.

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    Senior Member richardswife's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tut/

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    Nice easy instructions and great pictures to show each step of the process.

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    Super Member judykay's Avatar
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    LOVE the tute, thank you very much...I have been quilting for many years and finally got the binding the way I want it and now I can do baby quilts this way too. Thanks again and I agree the pictures are worth a thousand words and make it all seem so easy.
    Happy Quilting
    Judy in Lower Michigan

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    great tute-thanks
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    Senior Member Jennalyn's Avatar
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    This is a beautiful tutorial, but I'm afraid that step 3 and its corresponding picture are just confusing me. I'm fine up to that, but I just sort of get lost staring at that instruction and trying to figure out what it means with the picture. Would anyone be able to explain it a slightly different way?
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    Sorry it's unclear.

    "Picture3: Fold backing fabric lining up cut edge with corner of pieced top on the fold. Place a pin in the middle. Now stitch from folded corner to the pin. Clip corner."

    The top is the sliced off edge you see in picture 2. The white line is the stitching line. The pin will keep you from stitching too far.

    If it still us unclear, this weekend I will get my DH to help me take a few more pictures or a short video. I noticed this weekend that our camera will do like a 15 second video.

  23. #23
    Senior Member tate_elliott's Avatar
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    I made a baby quilt recently and, as I usually do, I self-bound it. But I looked up this tutorial because my corners don't turn out well. I gave the quilt away already, but I still have the mini-quilt I tested this on.

    The photo is a close-up scan of the four corners. I used this technique on three of the corners. On one corner, the lower left, I decided to try folding the excess fabric to one side instead of trimming it. You can see it looks a little lumpy on the left side. The first three corners look very good, the fourth looks much better than any of my past attempts, but not as good as the other three.

    Thanks, AlienQuilter for posting this.

    Tate

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    Thanks so much for this I always have issues with corners.

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    You're welcome!

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