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Thread: Sashing and cornerstones

  1. #1
    Junior Member homebody323's Avatar
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    Sashing and cornerstones

    There are more than one way to do things. I offer this simple explanation for an alternative to the traditional way of setting blocks with sashings and cornerstones.
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    Sally Dolin
    Rock Island, IL

  2. #2
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    Great food for thought. I will do this next time! Thanks for sharing.
    Linda

  3. #3
    Super Member feffertim's Avatar
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    great idea and don't know why I never thought of this. I always have problems with sashing with cornerstones. Thanks. So simple.

  4. #4
    Super Member audsgirl's Avatar
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    That seems to be a more practical method. You don't have long skinny strips to handle. Thanks for the tip!

  5. #5
    Super Member catmcclure's Avatar
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    That's how I do my cornerstones and sashing. I also strip piece them. That is, if my blocks are 12-1/2" and my sashing and cornerstones at 4-1/2", then I'll cut a strip of the sashing fabric 12-1/2" x WOF. I also cut a strip of the cornerstone material 4-1/2" x WOF. Sew those two strips together into a strip set and then subcut into 4-1/2" strips. The beauty of this is that the sashing strips are cut lengthwise of the grain and, once you sew them onto the block, your sashing strips have almost no stretch and all your blocks fit together so much easier.

  6. #6
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    thanks for posting your tut. this is also the way i do mine
    Nancy in western NY
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  7. #7
    Super Member duckydo's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tip, I think this method would be easier

  8. #8
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    Thank you for this information. I have so much trouble with cornerstones that I usually don't put them in, even though I know they will make the block look better. I am definitely doing this.

  9. #9
    Junior Member bmanley's Avatar
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    Great, looks like a good thing to me. Thanks

  10. #10
    Senior Member Sewnique's Avatar
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    Thank you, will give it a try!
    Bootsie

  11. #11
    Super Member ssnare's Avatar
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    Thank you.

  12. #12
    Senior Member omaluvs2quilt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catmcclure View Post
    That's how I do my cornerstones and sashing. I also strip piece them. That is, if my blocks are 12-1/2" and my sashing and cornerstones at 4-1/2", then I'll cut a strip of the sashing fabric 12-1/2" x WOF. I also cut a strip of the cornerstone material 4-1/2" x WOF. Sew those two strips together into a strip set and then subcut into 4-1/2" strips. The beauty of this is that the sashing strips are cut lengthwise of the grain and, once you sew them onto the block, your sashing strips have almost no stretch and all your blocks fit together so much easier.
    That SO makes sense, thanks for the tip! I've only done sashing once, and on an on-point quilt...I have to admit it took a lot of thought to make it work, the old brain isn't as sharp as it used to be, but I also used the block method rather than a separate strip between blocks (by accident, not design, but I'm sticking to it).

  13. #13
    Member leevenora's Avatar
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    This method looks great. Thanks for posting

  14. #14
    Junior Member fallonquilter's Avatar
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    Thanks so much - I will try this as I have had alot of problems lining up the corner stones just right in the past.

  15. #15
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    Thank you for posting ..makes sense ..will try this method

  16. #16
    Junior Member psthreads's Avatar
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    I will do that on my crazy quilt. I have done it in the past and it is so much easier. I forgot all about it.

  17. #17
    Super Member MaryMo's Avatar
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    I am wondering .... does this make squaring and blocking the quilt easier or more difficult? I've done it both ways but I've had problems squaring the quilt with this method. Maybe I'm missing something? thanks ....
    Make it a scrappy happy day!

  18. #18
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
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    Thanks for this tip. I've printed it so that I'll have it handy next time.
    jean

  19. #19
    Member marys's Avatar
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    Love this idea and it will make it much easier. Thank you so much for this information. Also love the idea that "catmcclure" had to say.

    "That's how I do my cornerstones and sashing. I also strip piece them. That is, if my blocks are 12-1/2" and my sashing and cornerstones at 4-1/2", then I'll cut a strip of the sashing fabric 12-1/2" x WOF. I also cut a strip of the cornerstone material 4-1/2" x WOF. Sew those two strips together into a strip set and then subcut into 4-1/2" strips. The beauty of this is that the sashing strips are cut lengthwise of the grain and, once you sew them onto the block, your sashing strips have almost no stretch and all your blocks fit together so much easier."

  20. #20
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Thanks, I will do mine this way now.
    Another Phyllis
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  21. #21
    Super Member JJean's Avatar
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    Jean

  22. #22
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    Thank you--very nice job on explaining!

  23. #23
    Super Member fred singer's Avatar
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    very good information
    Pegg


    Have a great day and happy sewing !

  24. #24
    Senior Member RUSewing's Avatar
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    I really like your second method. Thanks for sharing both of them!
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  25. #25
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    Thanks for this tip! I like working block by block instead of the long row of skinny sashing, trying to line up the cornerstones.

    The sashings are scrappy on this quilt, so I wanted to keep my sashings in order after placing them. I chain pieced the first sashing to the block, then the cornerstone to the second sashing, then the second block with its first sashing, then its next sashing is joined to the cornerstone, etc. to the end of the row.

    Without clipping the chain apart, I pressed the seams. Then as I clipped them apart, I pinned the second sashing/cornerstone combo for sewing and stacked the blocks in order for joining.

    On this quilt I join the rows as I go so I can see what scraps look best as I progress to the next row.
    Elizabeth

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