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Thread: 1940 15-91 Full Restoration

  1. #1
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    1940 15-91 Full Restoration

    This was left in my house when I bought it. It has been sitting for some years, but it is not in terrible shape. I started the process of doing a full restoration on the unit so I can put it to use. I really wanted to do a complete disassembly of the unit, but I cannot seem to remove the pin from the arm shaft. I have tried punches and an arbor press and it doesn't want to budge. I would like to glass bead the entire assembly and repaint it with a good etching primer and some glossy enamel and then do a full service / reassembly.


    Are the pins tapered and how do I get them out? I suppose they do not have to be removed, but I would prefer to clean and oil them while not risk getting any glass beads in the sleeve bearings.
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  2. #2
    Super Member KalamaQuilts's Avatar
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    fun project, and welcome to the board, where ya been all this time?
    some of our experts will be along in a bit!

  3. #3
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    http://vssmb.blogspot.com/ Lots of information and repairs on vintage sewing machines.
    Welcome to the board and that's a clever user name!
    Singer 66 treadle, Singer 15-91, JC Penney 6923, Kenmore 50, White 2334, Brother 920D serger. RIP Singer 1036

  4. #4
    Super Member OurWorkbench's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ngen33r View Post
    This was left in my house when I bought it. It has been sitting for some years, but it is not in terrible shape. I started the process of doing a full restoration on the unit so I can put it to use. ...
    I haven't had my 15-91s that far apart, but it appears that your machine may be a 15-90. I have a 15 that came with a 15-88 manual, however it had a motor and small hand wheel.

    I'm thinking that the machine could have been put to use without a complete disassembly. Some would be needed to get he metal bits cleaned and polished. Most machines just need maybe a little kerosene cleaning and fresh oil to be put back in working order.

    The decals look pretty good to me. I would polish with TR-3 unless the shellac is compromised, which it doesn't appear to be. Many have benefited by following https://www.quiltingboard.com/vintag...s-t193635.html

    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
    Last edited by OurWorkbench; 03-13-2018 at 06:17 PM. Reason: try correct line space
    Janey & John

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    I have read that entire blog and unfortunately nothing about removing the arm shaft. I believe that the one I have is a 15-91 because it has a potted motor with a worm drive, no belts. It is hard to see in the picture, but the bed has a big chip in it and the finish is so fragile that it just flakes off. Since I have already removed every other part for a deep cleaning, I don't want to only do a 95% job. A new paint job will last a lifetime. When I am done polishing all the tiny screws and parts, I will post a picture.

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    UPDATE:

    My GoogleFU must be strong tonight, I stumbled on the service manual for the 15-91. I am trying to upload a PDF but the server will not accept it.

    For now I have it shared on my Google Drive
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1XX...xuQRZ61mz4aFSs

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    Are you talking about the pin holding the handwheel bushing onto the shaft? On my 66 and 99, those were slotted screws.

    That area gets a fair bit of oil, so it might be varnished in place. some gentle heat or a long soak in kerosene/penetrating oil might be all it needs.

    I have not encountered any tapered pins on these machines, but you have tried punching both sides?

  8. #8
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    With some help, I was able to drive out the pins, both were tapered in the arm shaft and bobbin shaft. I only have the front bushing to drive out and the machine will be fully disassembled, short of separating the castings which I am not going to do. It is getting fun now.

  9. #9
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    When I removed the arm shaft on my 66, I just removed the handwheel bushing and front bushing setscrews, and tapped the end of the arm shaft, which pushed the front bushing out. I haven't been able to remove the front crank, and I am a little hesitant to anyway since I'm not sure if the crank is statically set or adjustable.

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    It would be interesting to see the whole process if you are of a mind. I have a FW that needs the whole process, so following someone going through the process in photos would be interesting.

    bkay

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    Today, I finished the glass beading of the casting and tonight I got some of the small parts in the vibrating polisher. I will post a picture tomorrow of the naked casting after it is thoroughly washed and given an alcohol rinse. I have some casting marks that need to be filled so I am going to get some filler to prep the surface before painting. I choose to not blast all of the linkages and shafts at this point. They will not be seen so I have them soaking in WD-40. I will give them a good scrub with a brass wire brush before reinstalling. Any visible parts will be polished with either a buffer or the dremel. I need to pick up some etching primer and masking tape.

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    I keep the original finish when it's as nice as on yours. Dull and dirty shellac cleans and polishes up very nicely. There's plenty of very worn machine worthy of a full refinishing. You have to post a picture, your project makes me very interested :- )

    The presser bar, needle bar, and the rods under the machine polish up like new by hand. With a product like Quick-Glo on a cloths, it's done in literally two minutes and machines cannot get it any better or quicker. I haven't tried it on the rougher castings yet, but I guess it works there too.

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    There is a great book out there on the Featherweight " The Featherweight 221 and I " by David McCallum.
    It has a section that covers restoration including fixing dents and redoing the finish.
    The procedure could probably be used on any machine.
    This is one of the best and most complete books on the Featherweight.

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    Fully blasted, washed and degreased. I am sure that I could have buffed and repaired the finish, but it was brittle and flaking. A new paint job will do it some good. It might not be as valuable but it will be functional. Also being fully apart, I can get a good clean and lube on all of the bushings and moving parts when it comes to re-assembly.

    Today it is masking the areas that don't get painted.
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    It looks fine. If you do a very good job it will be just as valuable if not more. A rewired and top condition 15-91 or 201-2 is not that common. If you go for black paint and decals like the original there's always some who prefers that, and there are quite a bit of interst in alternative colors too. Very few of us do this for the machine value. After cleaning and fixiup a machine can often be sold at a higher price, but these machines are worth most to those who use it and appreciate it. At least they keep their value.

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    I have a Pfaff 30 that had compete flaking of the paint on the head and a good amount on the bed. No way to salvage the paint job. Can you please describe what setup is needed to do a glass bed job on the casting?
    Maria
    Smoky Mountains of Tennessee

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mickey2 View Post
    It looks fine. If you do a very good job it will be just as valuable if not more. A rewired and top condition 15-91 or 201-2 is not that common. If you go for black paint and decals like the original there's always some who prefers that, and there are quite a bit of interst in alternative colors too. Very few of us do this for the machine value. After cleaning and fixiup a machine can often be sold at a higher price, but these machines are worth most to those who use it and appreciate it. At least they keep their value.

    I definitely plan to keep it and not sell it. I will most likely go black as the original, but white with black decals would be pretty wild to change it up. Maybe even some exotic car color with metal flake. I am also thinking about having stencils made for the decals and painting them on. I have a buddy that does vinyl decals. It would be much easier to airbrush than to work with those fragile decals and alignment.

    To blast it I just used an off the shelf sandblasting box with fine glass beads. The finish is very tough and it took some time to cut through. I would advise to use the fine grit to keep the finish smooth. A brass wire wheel will do the same thing if you don't have access to a blasting setup.
    Last edited by ngen33r; 03-22-2018 at 05:18 PM.

  18. #18
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    This one was done with a wire wheel
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    Thanks. No blasting set-up, s I think I will have to go with the wire wheel.
    Maria
    Smoky Mountains of Tennessee

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    Took a little break to finish a couple other small projects. Today I will be cleaning and spraying with etching primer.

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    I keep checking back.

    bkay

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    I spent all weekend polishing and cleaning the small parts. I will post a picture tonight. This is definitely time consuming. I still have not sprayed the paint on the casting. I needed to do some research first to make sure etching primer would not be an issue.

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    Thanks for the update. I subscribed to the thread, so I know when you post. Thanks again for sharing your experience.

    bkay

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    It's a bit late now, but some polished are very effective on the shiny parts; needle and presser bar shine up like new with something called Quick-Glo, in just a few minutes with hands, a cotton rag dipped in a bit of the paste; rust, grime and tarnish comes very effectively. Paste type polishes seem to be more effective than thinner liquids, at least the stuff I have tried. Pol and Autosol work well too, I'm sure there are several, and it's worth tracking down the brands that work well for steel and chrome. I have yet to pick a machine completely appart, I hope to avoid it, but once off I guess the cast iron rods and hinges clean up much easier too.

  25. #25
    Member Treadle&Gears's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mickey2 View Post
    Paste type polishes seem to be more effective than thinner liquids
    I also like pastes better. I use Mother's. It's a lightweight paste and it works very well on dark splotches and that whitish hazy film on plates and flywheels.
    Household Model 3X | Jones Family CS Hand | The Free No. 5 | Foley & Williams Reliable | Wheeler & Wilson 8 | Singer 66-1 | Singer 99K | Necchi NA Nora | Grumpy DH

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