Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Anyone know when this machine model got released ?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    3

    Anyone know when this machine model got released ?

    Hi,

    i found it next to a dumpster and decided to keep it cause it looks great. But i'm wondering when this model got released, i can't find it using google.
    Name:  20048654_10154586327677097_562367717_o.jpg
Views: 396
Size:  182.2 KB

    thx
    someone on reddit referred me to you.

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Sonoma County, CA
    Posts
    3,919
    I have one that looks just like it but is labeled as a model 1563 instead of a 585 - I don't know that I was ever able to definitively date mine beyond "probably mid 50's". I'm also not sure what the difference between the two machines is - I'm looking at the photo of mine right now and I can't spot any differences!
    Name:  white 1563_3.jpg
Views: 390
Size:  364.4 KB

    I can tell you that mine sews very nicely, though. Get yours cleaned up and you should have a nice machine!

  3. #3
    Senior Member OurWorkbench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    687
    Quote Originally Posted by corpc View Post
    Hi,

    i found it next to a dumpster and decided to keep it cause it looks great. But i'm wondering when this model got released, i can't find it using google.
    Welcome corpc.

    More than likely without documentation with the machine one can only guess that it is probably from the 1960s. It will probably clean up nicely.

    It looks like this machine may be a left homing. Make sure you have it set for straight stitching as it looks to me that it may have the straight stitch plate installed. A manual for this machine can be found at http://www.singerco.com/uploads/down...hite-565-x.pdf

    A lot of information can be found about this era of machines can be found on this thread -> https://www.quiltingboard.com/vintag...s-t207877.html

    It looks like there may some youtube videos per https://www.google.com/search?q=+&nu...hine+model+565

    Were there any bits and pieces found with it?

    Have fun with your 'new' machine.

    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
    Janey & John

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    3
    @sewnoma
    the model is a 565, but yeah they look very similar.

    @ourworkbench
    Thank you

    sorry, but what is left homing ? ( i'm not used to sewing, i picked it up for my girlfriend and also english is not my first language.

    Thanks for all the links. and unfortunately there were nothing else with it, just the machine and the cabinet. The pedal that activate it is made to be used with the leg instead of the feet.

    i'm glad to hear its probably from the 60s, i don't care if i don't have an exact date

    Thanks, to both of you

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    4,760
    It's not left homing, it has a LCR needle position lever, so it can be set at any of the three. Really nice looking machine!
    My name is Cathy - and I'm addicted to old sewing machines and their attachments.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    603
    You can usually remove the pedal from the knee bracket if you prefer a foot pedal. On Singer sewing machines, it slides out. On one of my Japanese machines, you have to unscrew it.

    Sorry, I don't understand left homing either. Janey and Cari do (and some others as well, I'm sure) and they will explain it.

    It looks like it's been in the home of a smoker. Once it's cleaned, it will look tons better. I use gojo (the handsoap for car mechanics) for mine. Just wipe it on and wipe it off with a clean towel or rag. Use an old toothbrush and qtips to get in the corners. If your metal parts look not so great, use metal polish. (That's not the only way to clean it, just the way I do it.) It will need to be cleaned and oiled on the inside, too.

    If some of your questions are not answered, ask them. Someone will almost always know or know where to find it.

    bkay

    This is an older machine, but the principals are the same.

    How to clean an oil a vintage sewing machine
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bidpJ..._order&list=UL


  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by bkay View Post

    It looks like it's been in the home of a smoker. Once it's cleaned, it will look tons better. I use gojo (the handsoap for car mechanics) for mine. Just wipe it on and wipe it off with a clean towel or rag. Use an old toothbrush and qtips to get in the corners. If your metal parts look not so great, use metal polish. (That's not the only way to clean it, just the way I do it.) It will need to be cleaned and oiled on the inside, too.

    thanks for the cleaning tips

  8. #8
    Senior Member OurWorkbench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    687
    Quote Originally Posted by Macybaby View Post
    It's not left homing, it has a LCR needle position lever, so it can be set at any of the three. Really nice looking machine!
    I wouldn't thought that it was left homing with the needle position at the top of the pillar. I'm basing it on the the needle plate for straight stitching - as the single hole is on the left side nearest the left feed dogs. It looks like this machine has the straight stitch plate on it. I guess technically it isn't left homing but with the straight stitch plate on - the needle better be in the left position.

    Left homing is where the machine set for straight stitching the needle enters the left side of the zig-zag plate hole.

    With cleaners, you do NOT want to have abrasives in them.

    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
    Janey & John

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    4,760
    Left homing means that you can not adjust the needle position when sewing a straight stitch, and it's always to the far left of the zig zag pattern.

    The best way to know if its left homing is to look for a needle position knob/lever. Sometimes they aren't as easy to identify, as they may just say LCR, or show a picture of some sort. This one shows the pictures and is clearly marked "Needle Position". If it's got a straight stitch plate with the hole in the left position, then you must set the needle position to the left position (it's currently set at the right position) or you'll hit the needle plate. So far, I've never seen a needle plate with a single hole in the far right position, only left or center. I'd love to know if someone has a single hole - right homing plate. Might be a special purpose to line up correctly with a specialty foot . . .

    Machines like this often came with a wide hole throat plate for zigzag, and a single hole plate for specific types of straight stitching. So if you don't have a wide hole plate, you'll want to get one for the machine. This also looks like it takes cams of some sort, maybe Sewnoma has them and can show you what they look like.

    I refer machines of this era as "dashboard" because they have the look of 50-60's era car dashboards. I would have loved to put together a collection of neat looking dashboard machines, but I seriously ran out of room.
    My name is Cathy - and I'm addicted to old sewing machines and their attachments.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.