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Thread: Can this machine be rescued?

  1. #101
    Super Member JudyTheSewer's Avatar
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    It is just part of the hobby - mouse poop and spider webs. As long as I don't bring home a "live one" I'll be okay.

  2. #102
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    Great job, looks almost new again
    Skip
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  3. #103
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Grant,
    What do you think caused all the mess, it looks like it was buried in an out house.

    BTW did you post pics of the cabinet?

    Joe & Elaine
    Here you go Joe.
    ~G~
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  4. #104
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant15clone View Post
    Joe, LOL. It DID look like it was stored in the Basement Apartment of that outhouse! I don't know where all of that gunk (as nice as I can say) came from. All I know was that it was someone's grandmothers machine. She passed away and it went to the mother. The mother passed away and it went to a daughter. That daughter didn't want it and dropped it of at the other daughters house that didn't have room for it. She saw my Want Ad for sewing machines and contacted me and I got it from her. Who knows where it was stored along the way.
    I can take a picture or two of the cabinet tomorrow and post them here (maybe a new thread?). It isn't fabulous but not bad. Even the mice thought so.
    ~G~
    Grant,

    I have a theory. Grimy filth like that "could" have come from filthy little fingers messing with it. Kids body oils are magnets for dirt and turn to that kind of filth. Whatever the cause that machine is lucky to have survived intact. It looks great and deserves a chance at a new home now.

    I have the same cabinet. Simple and good looking, yet quite useable. My Singer 338 is in it. The only thing I don't like about it is no storage drawers.

    Joe

  5. #105
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Grant,

    I have a theory. Grimy filth like that "could" have come from filthy little fingers messing with it. Kids body oils are magnets for dirt and turn to that kind of filth. Whatever the cause that machine is lucky to have survived intact. It looks great and deserves a chance at a new home now.

    I have the same cabinet. Simple and good looking, yet quite useable. My Singer 338 is in it. The only thing I don't like about it is no storage drawers.

    Joe
    I am going to find it a good home.
    This one has a drawer on the left side. if you look close you can see the outline.
    I posted a story about the machine and this cabinet here. http://www.quiltingboard.com/vintage...3881-4168.html
    ~G~

  6. #106
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Wow, that Singer was filthy! I've cleaned some dirty and yucky machines, but I think that one wins a prize or something! Great job getting it cleaned up.

  7. #107
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    Grant, are you the one I see advertizing to buy sewing machines on craigslist when I am up at my daughter's home? I see them all the time when I'm there in the NW suburbs of Chicago.
    And I see Miriam selling her rehabs here in IN.

  8. #108
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I was wondering if anybody was reading the CL ads...
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  9. #109
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janis View Post
    Grant, are you the one I see advertizing to buy sewing machines on craigslist when I am up at my daughter's home? I see them all the time when I'm there in the NW suburbs of Chicago.
    And I see Miriam selling her rehabs here in IN.
    Yes, that is me.
    ~G~

  10. #110
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    It's nice to be able to put a name to a listing that I see on CL list when I see them. At first I thought that Miriam was buying all of the machines on the local CL list. Then I saw that she was selling a lot of them. I can recognize which ones are hers, and say a silent 'hi' when I read them. So Miriam, let this be known that someone is talking to you at times. I've bought only one machine off CL, and attempted to a couple of other times, only to have someone beat me to them. But I keep watching...... Good luck to both of you on the buying and selling of the machines.

  11. #111
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I've had the same ad up for one machine for months. People come over and buy a different machine sort of like it. LOL
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  12. #112
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    Well I am pleased to say that I was able to fix the motor on the National Rotary I have been working on. I test ran it and it is running strong. You can see the updated pictures and a video of the motor test too on my page with the link below. But I will show a pic of the damage that was inside motor. The bare wires hanging out of the top of the pic is the problem. These wires were as a result of mice in the machine. Normally this would be a terminal problem. But I just don't give up that easy. All of those wires had to be reconnected to the other half that were broken.
    Further proof that they CAN be rescued with some work.
    ~G~

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  13. #113
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    The machine was one I won on line. I couldn't see it real well so I figured all those nice attachments would be worth the money I spent.
    1) The attachments don't go to the machine.
    2) The manuals (note plural) don't go to the machine.
    3) The machine does not turn.
    4) The machine does not have a power cord or foot control...
    5) Fred Flintstone might have serviced it...

    The attachments will go with some other machine around here and were worth the money I paid - I hope so anyway.
    The manuals - well - I have to see if they go with anything in my hoard... but I fear it is the one that goes only in reverse...

    Then the machine. This is a 1995 Kenmore with all kinds of bells and whistles... I dug through all the papers. Yes there were papers. This machine was taken to an AUTHORIZED SEARS SERVICE place. They charged $30 - doesn't say what they did - I think I know... The complaint was that it wouldn't sew over heavy material... I figured I had nothing to lose. Why not crack it open and see what there is to see inside a plastic wonder. Nothing to lose, right? Well the first thing I saw was a LOT of very hard gummy dried on oil - I'm thinking 3 in 1 oil... Tri-flow to the rescue. After I got the top of it oiled the machine reluctantly turned. I figured I should clean out the bobbin area - at first I didn't see one tiny little bit of lint.... then I probed. It was packed solid under there. Turns better... I noticed up in the needle bar area that there were threads wrapped around things that move or supposedly move. Almost every thing that moved up there had thread and dried up 3 in 1 oil. I worked on the stitch selector and got it moving. The button hole switch is still stuck ON. No cord so I don't know if it will run or not but I learned stuff.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  14. #114
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    I just wanted to share something here on the same machine I have been working on. This is the underside of the National Rotary. Everything is Rust, Rust, Rust under there. But Rust can be cleaned off and the machine restored. This is from my FB page. All is not lost. And this is just a comparison from how it was found to the "In Progress" stage. I hope this gives the incentive to anyone that might be looking at a boat anchor like this was to just give it a chance. More of them are able to come back from the grave than you might think. This one was going to be meted down and be a car fender (or something) if I didn't grab it. And all of that history would be gone forever.
    ~G~
    "I didn't want to have to go this far but it had to be done. This morning I completely gutted the underside of the machine. Thankfully, everything came out without much of a problem. It still has to be cleaned and polished before going back in. And while it is all out of there I am going to clean the bottom too. I already started when I took this pic. I have polished up the rusty bar to the far right and wiped off the first layer of filth underneath the bed. I removed the pink insulation "mouse mattresses" and "presents" too. Still a long way to go." But it is getting there.
    Name:  NR before and during bottom.jpg
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  15. #115
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    Nice! Great inspiration!

  16. #116
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    Well I got brave and decided to see what I can do with the Frister and Rossman. I currently have it soaking in ATF in a tupper. So my question is - do I try to immerse the entire machine or just the bottom of it? One jug of ATF pretty much covers the bed of the machine but doesn't get much higher than that.

  17. #117
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    Here's the picture of it right after I brought it home.

    She's already looking better and a few parts started moving after just a good dose of the Dritz oil I had on hand.

    Discovered that among the miscellany in the picture is what appears to be two bobbins and a spare spring for underneath the bobbin area. The other spring I don't know where it belongs or even if it is for this machine. It almost looks like a stretched out ballpoint pen spring.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by mom-6; 06-20-2013 at 08:50 PM.
    legendarycandles.com
    Just discovered I qualify for FABLE (Fabric Acquired Beyond Life Expectancy)

  18. #118
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mom-6 View Post
    Here's the picture of it right after I brought it home.

    She's already looking better and a few parts started moving after just a good dose of the Dritz oil I had on hand.

    Discovered that among the miscellany in the picture is what appears to be two bobbins and a spare spring for underneath the bobbin area. The other spring I don't know where it belongs or even if it is for this machine. It almost looks like a stretched out ballpoint pen spring.
    Mom-6, Way to go. The pen spring might be a foot pressure spring. The Singer 66 used one like that as well as several other Singer machines. It would be next to the needle bar.
    I am looking forward to seeing more updated pictures and wishing you luck.
    ~G~

  19. #119
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    I would begin by giving the whole machine a wipe down with a sewing machine oil whetted cloth. Every surface and nook and crannie cleaned. Then to the same to the underside. Use Tri-Flow on EVERY single place where two objects move or look like they should move.

    Then I would discuss the ATF solution.

  20. #120
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveH View Post
    I would begin by giving the whole machine a wipe down with a sewing machine oil whetted cloth. Every surface and nook and crannie cleaned. Then to the same to the underside. Use Tri-Flow on EVERY single place where two objects move or look like they should move.

    Then I would discuss the ATF solution.
    Thank you Steve. I have never used ATF on my machines and felt that I could not comment on what I did not know about first hand. I was waiting for a comment on this.
    There was a comment on QB recently about using CLR to remove rust and was waiting for comments on that as well as other things used and never found out the result. I think a tips and tricks thread might be in order as well as a Do and DON'T to a machine might be good too. I have seen a lot of mistakes made and I for one would like everyone to have good results. You, Joe, Miriam the Cathy's, Glen, and so many others that have advice one way or another would be most helpful to everyone I think. I know I could learn from, and have learned, from people here on QB. We all, and others have learned and shared. There should be a place for the do's and dont's. Don't you think? Is there one already for restorations and repair? If so, direct me with a link. If not, let's get one going and have a link to it here. I think it is needed. I have a lot to share and am more than willing. And I know I am not alone.
    ~G~

  21. #121
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant15clone View Post
    Thank you Steve. I have never used ATF on my machines and felt that I could not comment on what I did not know about first hand. I was waiting for a comment on this.
    There was a comment on QB recently about using CLR to remove rust and was waiting for comments on that as well as other things used and never found out the result. I think a tips and tricks thread might be in order as well as a Do and DON'T to a machine might be good too. I have seen a lot of mistakes made and I for one would like everyone to have good results. You, Joe, Miriam the Cathy's, Glen, and so many others that have advice one way or another would be most helpful to everyone I think. I know I could learn from, and have learned, from people here on QB. We all, and others have learned and shared. There should be a place for the do's and dont's. Don't you think? Is there one already for restorations and repair? If so, direct me with a link. If not, let's get one going and have a link to it here. I think it is needed. I have a lot to share and am more than willing. And I know I am not alone.
    ~G~
    I think this is suppose to be what you are wanting... LOL
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  22. #122
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant15clone View Post
    I have never used ATF on my machines and felt that I could not comment on what I did not know about first hand. I was waiting for a comment on this.~G~
    I have not used ATF either. Just so's ya know.

    It is funny when I see an old machine like that, my mind does the same type of thing that it does when I see a piece of armor that I want to reproduce... It automatically starts building a checklist of activities in order...

    I see that Hengsenberg, and my mind went..

    1. Sewing machine oil, on a microfiber cloth - Wipe down
    2. Oil and Q-Tip - everything that the cloth didn't get
    3. Underside - same as above 1 and 2
    4. tri-flow EVERYTHING.
    5. the HARD PART - Wait 10 minutes..
    6. Try movement, gently, Remember every "grinding sound" or "gritty feel" is wear happening!

    Repeat as necessary.

    I only have two machines which have required more that that.

    I will post a few observations on rust and removal in a bit...

  23. #123
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    I have never used ATF, never found a need for it. I have tried CLR it works but very slow so I stick to Evaprust to remove rust. I like you Steve use sewing machine oil and tri-flow and PB on cranky screws and nut. However I am always on the lookout for something new that works and make the job easier without damage to the machine. Can't wait to hear what you have to say about rust.
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  24. #124
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    Name:  rust image.jpg
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    This picture hopefully will illustrate the most common misconception of "rusted solid" machines.

    MOST machines are actually rusted in place, rather than rusted solid. Meaning that they have a coating of rust that has formed on the surface which actually bonds the two components which were intended to move. The good news is the same rust also protects the internal contact surfaces. Because most older machines were so well made with very tight tolerances, there is not much room for moisture to penetrate, and the tiny gaps are easy to "rust shut".

    What most of my machines need is this "bond" removed so that the parts are free and so that lube can get into the areas needed. One of the most common things folks do is just add oil to the pile of rust. It will work in many cases, but it is best if you can oil it and then using something softer than the metal (toothpick is my fav) try to clean out the oil holes and pick at the rust at the seams where things are supposed to move so it can get out of the way and allow the lube to get in.

  25. #125
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    So if the regular sewing machine oil loosens only the screw type parts after having had overnight to do the magic, I need to go after the joints, etc with the toothpick?

    The base has now soaked in the ATF overnight. (Second night since oiling liberally with regular sewing machine oil.) I'm about to take it out and see if that has helped loosen anything underneath.

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