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Thread: Does this Singer 15 have reverse?

  1. #1
    Member DKuehn's Avatar
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    Does this Singer 15 have reverse?

    I was wondering if anyone knows if this machine has reverse or is that just a stitch length adjuster?

    Thanks

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  2. #2
    Member DKuehn's Avatar
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    I have done some research, I believe the answer is "no", there is no reverse on this one.

  3. #3
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    You turn the fabric ;- ) I think the reverse lever was introduced sometime in the 1920s. By then decals were much simpler, and I doubt there are any model 15 with reverse lever and Egyptian decals. How old is your machine?

  4. #4
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    The one I have does not have reverse. It could be a kick butt treadle. That hand wheel is extra deep. If you want you can convert it back to a treadle by putting on one of the heavy hand wheels but you may lose your bobbin winder. You could use a sidewinder. I'm thinking yours was converted to electric by changing out the hand wheel and putting on a motor. But who knows, I'm surprised to see a motor mount. Some have improvised the motor attachment rigs. Do you know what year that machine was made?
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  5. #5
    Super Member Rodney's Avatar
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    There is one Singer 15 with the Egyptian decals and reverse. The newer ones Singer had made in Asia in the 1970s or 80s. Not near as nice as that machine.
    That machine is in great shape. The Egyptian decals on the originals are usually in worse condition. If the price is any sort of affordable I'd get it.
    Rodney
    "Neglect to oil the machine will shorten its life and cause you

    trouble and annoyance" Quote from Singer Model 99 Manual

  6. #6
    Member DKuehn's Avatar
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    From my research I believe it to be a 15sv10, probably made in the early 40's. Not sure why they would skip reverse on it.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DKuehn View Post
    From my research I believe it to be a 15sv10, probably made in the early 40's. Not sure why they would skip reverse on it.
    When this world was less hurry up, I sewed on machines without reverse and never thought about not having a reverse function or a needle up/down function. We just manually turned the handwheel to put the needle down in the fabric and turned the item to stitch back over a just sewn line or in a different direction. These days, I want those functions at the touch of a button. We never would have imagined that someday those old machines would be sought after and prized.

  8. #8
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    I have seen later model 15s with out the reverse lever, one dated to 1950. The later ones usually have the reverse lever. Singers around here are almost all made at the Kilbowie factory in Scotland, with the odd exception, not often at all. This is the first US example with a later production date.

  9. #9
    Super Member SunlitenSmiles's Avatar
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    Ugg, reverse is always a thick place in the seam.......much nicer to tie the threads in a nice neat square knot.

    ok, yes I am very old.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunlitenSmiles View Post
    Ugg, reverse is always a thick place in the seam.......much nicer to tie the threads in a nice neat square knot.

    ok, yes I am very old.
    There is a video on youtube on how a Dior jacket is made these days, they finish of the seams by tying the ends of the threads, no backtack or anything like that. It's not the only video showing this either. I think it's a technique used with modern machines too, for those who go for something better than quickest and easiest.

  11. #11
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mickey2 View Post
    There is a video on youtube on how a Dior jacket is made these days, they finish of the seams by tying the ends of the threads, no backtack or anything like that. It's not the only video showing this either. I think it's a technique used with modern machines too, for those who go for something better than quickest and easiest.
    Oh my gosh, that triggered a memory of me in sewing class all those years ago, learned on a treadle in school, where we tied off the ends of our darts! By hand! As the years passed we got more modern but they were still black headed Singers, back in the olden days.
    Alyce

  12. #12
    Member DKuehn's Avatar
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    I'm thinking about getting it for my 12 year old daughter, she currently has a 66-16 I gave her, but I think she'd like the sphinx model a little more, at least aesthetically. Not sure what she'd think about losing the reverse feature.

    I sew on my 27 treadle without reverse and it's fine, but if you want to chug through a quick project it's nice to be able to backtrack real quick.

  13. #13
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    The drop in bobbin on the 66 was the newest feature at one point, though by the time model 66 were given a backtack it certainly wasn't anymore. The 15 on the other hand is an every older model, but for some reason its' popularity has kept in high regards up to our days. In my experience, all these features has a lot to do with what we get accustomed to. I have had my 201 for well over a year know, and I haven't used my zigzagger nor my computerized machine much at all since. It has to do with the type of clothes make and projects I do. It sort of became a sport to manage on the 201. It's certainly is a smooth machine, with very nice buttonholer attachments. Either of the 66 and 15 should be equally lovely to work on in my mind. The 15 has a very good reputation when it comes to darning and quilting.

  14. #14
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    No backstitch, but that isn't at all bad, just different. This is a beautiful machine and to be treasured. You can learn which finishing technique works best for you. Baskstitch isn't very pretty anyway.

  15. #15
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    My model 15-88 (1935 release) has back stitch, but the stitch length plate is quite different from this one.
    Shirley in Arizona

  16. #16
    Super Member SunlitenSmiles's Avatar
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    If you are doing a dart in chiffon or lace the nicest finish is to bring up a length of bobbin thread and thread it backwards up to the top spool (do not just knot it and pull it backwards, that would put lint in your tension mechanism ) then sew the dart from the point to the seam......it looks like magic ..... always remember to sink your needle into the fabric where you want your first stitch to be every seam you start to sew.......yes I used to work for a designer and everything I worked on was an original for a special group of customers. circa 1957

  17. #17
    Senior Member greywuuf's Avatar
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    for production work I read where singer just recommended an in crease in hand pressure... kinda hold the favic som advancing for the first couple of stitches.... in my experience that works Very very well and a double stitched area with very short stitches is indeed quite a pain to "undo"
    " one should endeavor to keep ones straight pins from the floor whilst treadling barefoot" .... me 2015

  18. #18
    Member PatriciaPf's Avatar
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    One helpful method to end a seam is to shorten stitch length, make very tiny stitches, at the very end of the seam. They aren't likely to come out.

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