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Thread: Easy way to change out machines

  1. #1
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    Easy way to change out machines

    Basic question: Is there an easy way to switch out a 15-91 and a 201-2 in a cabinet? I want to keep both machines (and use them), but don't have room for two cabinets. They both have that black thingy that attaches to the cabinet and fills in the space that the wires go through. I can't figure a way around that. Would I just have to live with a hole there? (I hope that makes sense.)

    bkay

  2. #2
    Junior Member Steelsewing's Avatar
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    The 'spring plate' is what I've heard it called; not sure if that's the correct technical term. I've seen cabinets where the plate was removed and an empty space left, and I've seen others that removed the spring plate and found (or made) a rectangular tray that slipped into that space. It's not needed in any way. Might be an opportunity to get creative with the space! =)

    For a moment there, I thought you were asking about the rubber band method...

    which I highly recommend.
    Last edited by Steelsewing; 03-11-2019 at 12:13 PM.
    *Note: Tonight's clairvoyant meeting cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances.

  3. #3
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    I was talking about the spring plate. So, I see the answer is to remove the spring plate from the machine and live with the space or find something to fill it.

    I had not seen that rubber band thing before, thanks.

    Thanks Cari.

    bkay

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    Dang I feel foolish! I don't know how many times I have fought those dang hinges, just to see that a rubber band is all I needed!
    Thanks for the post

  5. #5
    Super Member leonf's Avatar
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    Gotta agree about hte rubber band. I've fought those way too many times.
    "Sacrifices must be made." Otto Lilienthal

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cari-in-Oly View Post
    Bkay, why not just leave the plate there? Then there won't be a hole next to the machine.

    Cari
    So, as I understand it, you are suggesting that I remove the cords from the spring plate. Then, when I switch out the machines, I just push the cords through the area where the spring plate is?

    The controller is hard wired to the machine on the 15 and also on the 201 I'm working on. Could you put some kind of connector on the controller wire so that you could just plug it in and not have to thread it through the spring plate opening?

    bkay

  7. #7
    Super Member tuckyquilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steelsewing View Post
    The 'spring plate' is what I've heard it called; not sure if that's the correct technical term. I've seen cabinets where the plate was removed and an empty space left, and I've seen others that removed the spring plate and found (or made) a rectangular tray that slipped into that space. It's not needed in any way. Might be an opportunity to get creative with the space! =)

    For a moment there, I thought you were asking about the rubber band method...

    which I highly recommend.
    OMG.. this is a terrific method! Why didn't I know about the rubber bands?
    Jackie
    Lover of Scrappy, Chocolate and Wine

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    Steelsewing - Thanks for the link to the video! I never knew about using rubber bands to hold the pins - simple but a great idea!! Thanks!
    Deb

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cari-in-Oly View Post
    I think you might be over thinking this...

    Cari
    I could be guilty of that. It wouldn't be the first time.

    Thanks, Cari.

    bkay

  10. #10
    Junior Member Steelsewing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkay View Post
    I could be guilty of that. It wouldn't be the first time.
    I've given this some thought and I think (?) I understand the dilemma: to be able to use one cabinet and easily swap out machine heads with little to no effort. Having the spring plate there or not there doesn't really assist all that much with wire disconnect and re-connect. You still have to unscrew the plug receiver screw, reach around and undo two of the twist nuts, remove the pedal/knee control wires... and then reverse all this when you slip in the other head. This would be particularly true with a 15-91 and 201 swap.

    The easier (?) way to accomplish this would be if there were some other kind of way of removing those two wires and then reconnecting. If you were to say.... find a spot in the run of the wire from when it tucks into the hole on the spring plate... say 6 inches away from the hole on the inside of the cabinet.

    Now, cut one of those two wires and add a splice, and then measure two to three inches from that splice and cut and splice the second wire. Then, add these wire connectors. You want to leave a a couple of inches between each splice one so that one end of the splice connector can easily slip through the hole in the spring plate.

    You'll need to make one full set, and then another half set. Say you put the male splice ends on the sewing machine side, and the female on the knee control side. Now you need a duplicate set of male splice end wires for the second machine. This way... the wire sets stay connected to the machine. No fooling with wire nuts or loosening the plug receiver. It would save a lot of time and hassle and you'd be able to switch back and forth way easier.

    Name:  SpringplateSplice.jpg
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    Here's the idea on paper

    and here's a link to the sort of wire splices that I could find online that might work.

    Is this closer to what you had in mind?
    *Note: Tonight's clairvoyant meeting cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances.

  11. #11
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    I don't understand what the spring plate is. Can you show me a picture? Google was no help.

  12. #12
    Junior Member Steelsewing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by themadpatter View Post
    I don't understand what the spring plate is. Can you show me a picture? Google was no help.
    Name:  Screen Shot 2019-03-14 at 7.59.38 AM.png
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    This above ^ this is the black 'spacer' that is mounted in the cabinet on the far right side of the opening where the sewing machine is lifted up when in use. On most old, black, electric Singer machines mounted in a cabinet this plate swings up and down with the machine. It has a hole toward the back of the plate which allows the two-strand wire to come down off the electrical junction and connect to the knee control - or foot pedal - or sometimes both (if it's one where the foot pedal can be removed from the knee control bracket) inside the cabinet.

    The bracket/plate has a large spring at one end that is fastened to the inside of the cabinet and assists in rolling the machine up into the sewing position. I've seen it called the spring plate, spring hinge, lift hinge, etc. On a treadle machine... it might have two holes to allow the belt to pass through to the wheel. On my 1920 Singer Library table... there are three rectangular slots in the plate (no hole) designed to pinch hold of the power cord when you screwed the end into a light bulb socket...lol.

    You don't really notice the plate when a machine is lifted into the sewing position since the plate lays flush with the deck of the machine.
    Last edited by Steelsewing; 03-14-2019 at 04:21 AM.
    *Note: Tonight's clairvoyant meeting cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances.

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    Thanks Steelsewing. That's the solution. Wow! I miss Radio Shack.

    bkay

  14. #14
    Super Member leonf's Avatar
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    https://www.quiltingboard.com/vintag...d-t303589.html

    The second pic shows the spring plate angled down a bit under the handwheel.
    "Sacrifices must be made." Otto Lilienthal

  15. #15
    Junior Member Steelsewing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkay View Post
    Thanks Steelsewing. That's the solution. Wow! I miss Radio Shack.
    No prob bkay. Glad to help. My only concern going that route would be to find the best insulated splicers available (that will still pass through the hole) but I'm fairly certain you're fully aware of this priority as well!

    Good luck! =)
    *Note: Tonight's clairvoyant meeting cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cari-in-Oly View Post
    You don't have to miss them, they're still on the interwebs -
    https://www.radioshack.com/

    Cari
    Yeah, but they aren't down the street where you can go in and actually see what you are buying.

    Bummer.

    bkay

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