Hand Crank for Singer 27

Old 01-25-2022, 11:49 AM
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Default Hand Crank for Singer 27

I found a 1911 Sphinx Model 27 Treadle machine in a thrift store last weekend and was thrilled to bring to home with every intention on converting it to a hand crank.

Problem? It's the 27 with no motor boss
I was informed that the hand crank I would need was the wrap around one that was very rare and very expensive!

Does anyone have a suggestion on ANY hand crank that would work or where to find a wrap around cheaper?

I suppose I could consider treadling her again, but I have no room for (another) sewing table.

Thanks for any help available!
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Old 01-25-2022, 06:29 PM
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There are at least two possible solutions:

1. Use a tractor, or steering wheel, knob, as in the first picture. The knob in the picture came from ebay and these are not for sewing machines, but typically on a tractor to allow the wheel to be turned with one hand. The advantage for this application is price, about $13 for the one I bought and ease of installation (there is some cut up rubber inner tube from a bike tire under the clamps); the disadvantage is the turn ratio is 1:1, meaning one revolution of the knob gives you one cycle of the machine, i.e. one stitch, whereas the typical after market hand crank is about 3:1. This 1:1 ratio makes for some tedious sewing if there's any volume involved.

2. Add an aftermarket hand crank. This option, at least for me, is only theoretical as I started it on a machine but never finished, so take it with a grain of salt. You would have to tap a hole under the hand wheel into the pillar in the correct place to allow a crank to line up with the hand wheel, two holes actually, one large and one small. The small hole would be for a smaller bolt and would keep the crank in an upright position. You can see in the picture the shiny bolt on the right of the pillar; that machine is also a treadle only 27. You would also have to drill an extra hole into the hand crank itself for the small bolt, and shim out the hand crank with washers to keep it as vertical as possible in relation to the hand wheel. Plus, I'm not sure the typical after market hand crank will spin a 6 spoke hand wheel, which your machine likely has, which means it may have to be replaced with a 9 spoke hand wheel (if one will fit onto the shaft of an older machine). You can see why I never finished this project.
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Old 01-26-2022, 07:58 AM
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Originally Posted by JoeJr View Post
There are at least two possible solutions:

1. Use a tractor, or steering wheel, knob, as in the first picture. The knob in the picture came from ebay and these are not for sewing machines, but typically on a tractor to allow the wheel to be turned with one hand. The advantage for this application is price, about $13 for the one I bought and ease of installation (there is some cut up rubber inner tube from a bike tire under the clamps); the disadvantage is the turn ratio is 1:1, meaning one revolution of the knob gives you one cycle of the machine, i.e. one stitch, whereas the typical after market hand crank is about 3:1. This 1:1 ratio makes for some tedious sewing if there's any volume involved.

2. Add an aftermarket hand crank. This option, at least for me, is only theoretical as I started it on a machine but never finished, so take it with a grain of salt. You would have to tap a hole under the hand wheel into the pillar in the correct place to allow a crank to line up with the hand wheel, two holes actually, one large and one small. The small hole would be for a smaller bolt and would keep the crank in an upright position. You can see in the picture the shiny bolt on the right of the pillar; that machine is also a treadle only 27. You would also have to drill an extra hole into the hand crank itself for the small bolt, and shim out the hand crank with washers to keep it as vertical as possible in relation to the hand wheel. Plus, I'm not sure the typical after market hand crank will spin a 6 spoke hand wheel, which your machine likely has, which means it may have to be replaced with a 9 spoke hand wheel (if one will fit onto the shaft of an older machine). You can see why I never finished this project.
Thank you for your response! I have seen several of the knobs and since my husband is a truck driver he has plenty as well!

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Old 01-26-2022, 03:18 PM
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There are hand-cranks available that don't require a boss. There is one right now on the 'bay.

I understand that they come with a replacement stop motion knob which has a hole in it to accept the crank. I understand that they will not increase the number of stitches like the original Singer crank, one turn produces I believe three stitches, but I understand that they do work.

These do not need a boss, they fit right on the handwheel through the replacement knob.

The seller, who isn't me, makes them.

Last edited by 1.41; 01-26-2022 at 03:20 PM.
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Old 01-26-2022, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by 1.41 View Post
There are hand-cranks available that don't require a boss. There is one right now on the 'bay.....
If you are referring to https://www.ebay.com/itm/265043459603 It does not list the 27 as a machine that it will fit. If memory serves correctly there may be a difference in the hub depth and probably would not work. Here again it is a 1:1 turning ratio much like a steering knob.

There is a different one for the featherweight 221 and 222..

There are some options for attaching a motor with as seen at Colorado get-together? that I think is probably like what is on the back of https://www.ebay.com/itm/334289112368

Others have made a bracket on the back of a base or case to attach a motor to.. Cheryl & Chris built something to house a motor for a Davis Vertical Feed machine as seen at Colorado get-together?

Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
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Old 01-29-2022, 05:50 PM
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Default 15K3 Hand Crank and Bobbin Winder from 1898

Here is an example of an original Singer hand crank that dosent require the motor boss. Hope it helps.
https://youtu.be/XnVOxc__nKw

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