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-   -   Cleaning and repairing the Shellac clear coat on Vintage sewing machine heads (https://www.quiltingboard.com/vintage-antique-machine-enthusiasts-f22/cleaning-repairing-shellac-clear-coat-vintage-sewing-machine-heads-t193635.html)

grannysewer 07-06-2012 06:36 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Glenn, thank you so much for posting this tut. Do you think I would be able to use it clean up this Pfaff? Other than the 2 bad spots, it's not in bad shape. Thanks, Bobbie

Glenn 07-06-2012 06:41 PM


Originally Posted by grannysewer (Post 5344618)
Glenn, thank you so much for posting this tut. Do you think I would be able to use it clean up this Pfaff? Other than the 2 bad spots, it's not in bad shape. Thanks, Bobbie

Bobbie you sure can. Just make sure you remove the loose japan and paint it with the aniline dye stain I described and then polish with the shellac technique and it should come out fine. Skip

redbugsullivan 07-06-2012 08:06 PM

Glenn, your time has been well spent here. There are tons of vintage machines that will be salvaged due to this thread. While most folks treasure looks over function, this method of restoration will be sure that each is worthy of best of both worlds!

Just remember folks, these machines have history worthy of saving, stitch by stitch. Each time you "fix" a machine to increase its value, even if it is just its looks, a wee bit of the past is saved. Our young ones are paying attention, to be sure!

miriam 07-07-2012 02:23 AM


Originally Posted by redbugsullivan (Post 5344844)
Glenn, your time has been well spent here. There are tons of vintage machines that will be salvaged due to this thread. While most folks treasure looks over function, this method of restoration will be sure that each is worthy of best of both worlds!

Just remember folks, these machines have history worthy of saving, stitch by stitch. Each time you "fix" a machine to increase its value, even if it is just its looks, a wee bit of the past is saved. Our young ones are paying attention, to be sure!

I could not agree more. There will never be machines like these made ever again. They are so well made. Clean them up and fix the finish.

DanofNJ 07-07-2012 06:22 AM

Great thread.

I am a bit confused though.

Why don't you use lacquer rather than shellac. I use lacquer and spray it when I'm completed with paint restoration, then buff. The key question is?

Did Singer et. al. use clear lacquer or shellac?

Thanks,

Dan

Glenn 07-07-2012 05:07 PM


Originally Posted by DanofNJ (Post 5345638)
Great thread.

I am a bit confused though.

Why don't you use lacquer rather than shellac. I use lacquer and spray it when I'm completed with paint restoration, then buff. The key question is?

Did Singer et. al. use clear lacquer or shellac?

Dan

singer used shellac not lacquer I use only the original finish on these machines. I touch up the japan with alcohol based aniline dye mixed with shellac. i never repaint a machine. I always restore with the original products.

DanofNJ 07-07-2012 07:33 PM

Didn't realize that they used shellac...I will start using it too then...great help.

Dan

redbugsullivan 07-08-2012 08:57 AM

Since I have now cleaned 2 machines using this method, here is a useful tip. When cleaning those areas that have heavy residue embedded in the japan, apply the alcohol/linseed mix and wait half a minute. You can sure tell when the grunge is ready to be wiped off! It starts to get tacky instead of just waiting for a quick wipe. Then, I apply a bit more of the mix with a cotton swab on the worst areas only. The results are amazing!

I also use those blue shop/paper towels instead of fabric. Yes, they cost more but I find myself doing a neater job when working. Instead of searching for a clean area of the rag, I grab a new towel! No lint, great at holding the mixture in one spot instead of bleeding through to larger areas. Plus, this way I don't have to go searching through my DH rag bag!!

Glenn 07-08-2012 01:01 PM


Originally Posted by redbugsullivan (Post 5348406)
Since I have now cleaned 2 machines using this method, here is a useful tip. When cleaning those areas that have heavy residue embedded in the japan, apply the alcohol/linseed mix and wait half a minute. You can sure tell when the grunge is ready to be wiped off! It starts to get tacky instead of just waiting for a quick wipe. Then, I apply a bit more of the mix with a cotton swab on the worst areas only. The results are amazing!

I also use those blue shop/paper towels instead of fabric. Yes, they cost more but I find myself doing a neater job when working. Instead of searching for a clean area of the rag, I grab a new towel! No lint, great at holding the mixture in one spot instead of bleeding through to larger areas. Plus, this way I don't have to go searching through my DH rag bag!!

Great tip redbugs. thanks Skip

nanna-up-north 07-09-2012 07:46 AM

Skip, great tut, as always. I so appreciate your advice. I'm wondering though where to look for evaporrust. My DH and son left some fishing lures down in the boat last week and the hooks got rusty from the heavy rain that came down. I'm thinking that soaking the hooks in evaporrust might be the solution to the problem. If the hooks aren't sharp (and rust sure makes them dull) the fish don't get caught. I've got to find a way to get the rust off. Then, I can use evaporrust on the machines I find as well.


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