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-   -   Are there different 201's????? (https://www.quiltingboard.com/vintage-antique-machine-enthusiasts-f22/there-different-201s-t290247.html)

SusieQOH 08-07-2017 06:18 AM

Are there different 201's?????
 
Mine was made in 1955. When I see the term 201-2 I'm confused.
Can someone un-confuse me? :)
Thanks

NZquilter 08-07-2017 06:44 AM

Sorry, it was probably my PM this morning that confused you! If I understand correctly, the Singer 201-2 has a potted motor and the Singer 201-3, or 201K has a belt driven motor. The Singer 201-1 is a treadle. I think they are kind of rare though (???) Maybe I'm wrong. I also don't think that the year made has anything to do with the model number. (Please some one correct me if I am wrong here. This is the info I found after a quick Google search.)

Just like the Singer 15-88 is a treadle, the Singer 15-90 has a belt driven motor and the Singer 15-91 has a potted motor. I hope I'm not confusing you more!

SusieQOH 08-07-2017 07:09 AM

Oh thank you!!! I couldn't find the info that you were able to find. What I have is a 201-2. It has the potted motor.
And my 15 is a 90.

Mickey2 08-07-2017 07:13 AM

The K only stands for the Kilbowie factory in Scotland. I have discoverd there are several versions and minor differences. For some reason it looksl ike treadle and hand crank were more common for a much longer time in Europe than in the US. I'm not sure why. I keep bumping into hand crank 99s with serial numbers dating them well into the 50s, less so with the 201s, but at least as long as the cast iron production kept up. There are much fewer 201K2s over here, the most common is the belt driven version.

There are two types of chromed plates on these, the later one is pin-striped sort of, and there are at least two different gold decal patterns, maybe three. There are variants to the base of the spool pins too, but doesn't seem to have been given special subnumbers (The part number of the body might differ?)

The black cast iron 201s were taken over by a third version in cast aluminiun at the UK factory, given the number 201K23, and with a new exterior design. My 1955 is an all beige version of this one, but the most common is seems to be a beige-brown color combination. The early aluminium production was all black with chrome details, these turn up but not as often as the beige.

SusieQOH 08-07-2017 09:12 AM

I've never seen a beige 201. Wow!
I've never had a hand crank. I have a hard time imagining being able to sew with it. They are so cute though.

J3General 08-07-2017 10:26 AM

@Mickey2 - my understanding is that hand cranks were more popular in Europe because rooms in homes were smaller on average and a hand crank does not take up as much room as a treadle.

@SusieQOH - I have four hand cranks (1 28K, 2 127's, and 1 128) and find them about as easy as an electric to sew on - just not as fast. In fact, I prefer an 'hc' for precise, slow speed, ss sewing - the stitches on mine are very pretty. I plan on teaching my five young granddaughters to sew on them (and then gifting them one each as well as an electric if they progress in their skills). An 'hc' appears safer than an electric for young fingers!

SusieQOH 08-07-2017 12:51 PM


Originally Posted by J3General (Post 7881779)
@Mickey2 - my understanding is that hand cranks were more popular in Europe because rooms in homes were smaller on average and a hand crank does not take up as much room as a treadle.

@SusieQOH - I have four hand cranks (1 28K, 2 127's, and 1 128) and find them about as easy as an electric to sew on - just not as fast. In fact, I prefer an 'hc' for precise, slow speed, ss sewing - the stitches on mine are very pretty. I plan on teaching my five young granddaughters to sew on them (and then gifting them one each as well as an electric if they progress in their skills). An 'hc' appears safer than an electric for young fingers!

Very interesting!!! Thanks for the lesson- that's one style I knew nothing about.

OurWorkbench 08-07-2017 03:46 PM


Originally Posted by SusieQOH (Post 7881578)
Mine was made in 1955. When I see the term 201-2 I'm confused.
Can someone un-confuse me? :)
Thanks

A good resource can be found at http://ismacs.net/singer_sewing_mach...ny/model-list/

After reading the description on that page you can then go to appropriate page for the model you want to know more about.

Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.

SusieQOH 08-07-2017 03:50 PM

Janey, I forgot to check that one, thanks! I know I've gone there before but forgot about it.

SteveH 08-09-2017 07:16 AM

in regards to sewing with a handcrank...

With an electric machine or treadle most folks use one hand in front, and one hand behind the stitch. You have NO feel for the "pull" that the machine has, that is why folks use the second hand, to gain that control.

With a handcrank each rotation of the handcrank cycles the machine 3 times. You can literally feel in your right hand the feed dogs pulling the fabric through. You only need your left hand to steer and provide some resistance to the pull. You have WAY more precise control of stitch location. I have yet to find a person who does not find hand crank sewing easier than electric or treadle, once they have practiced it a bit.


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