Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Main > For Vintage & Antique Machine Enthusiasts
Question re: step-up transformer watts >

Question re: step-up transformer watts

Question re: step-up transformer watts

Old 11-06-2017, 09:36 PM
  #1  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
lmc8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 268
Default Question re: step-up transformer watts

Hello, fellow vintage machine lovers.

My Lady Nora, is a Great Britain 222K featherweight, she has a 220V 3-prong plug and came with a 2-prong converter for our US 120v plug-ins which only runs the sewing machine at a slow speed. I know I need to replace the prong converter with a step-up transformer but there are different versions with different watts. I want to be careful to not damage the 230V-250V 0.25amp motor with more watts than needed. If anyone here has dealt with this scenario, I would appreciate your guidance. How many transformer watts do I need?
lmc8 is offline  
Old 11-06-2017, 10:06 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Sleepy Hollow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Oregon
Posts: 890
Default

P (watts) = I (amps) * V (volts), so you need a minimum of a 60 Watt transformer. However, the amount of power used by the machine will be determined by the machine's resistance, rather than the size of the transformer. The transformer will just determine how much power is available. You don't want to fully load your transformer (best to keep it under 80% of the rating).

I'd get a 100 or 200 Watt transformer, which will keep it under the 80% utilization recommendation.
Sleepy Hollow is offline  
Old 11-08-2017, 03:27 AM
  #3  
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 81
Default

We have just moved from Hungary to the US, and we brought our digital piano with us. We faced the same issue as you do, with converting the voltage from 220V to 110V. I contacted the piano maker, and they recommended this step up-step down converter: http://www.voltageconverters.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=VC100W. I ordered it (not expensive at all), and it works great! You don't even need the plug adaptor, as you plug your machine into the converter, which then plugs into the wall. I hope this helps.
nuffsaid is offline  
Old 11-09-2017, 04:23 AM
  #4  
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 81
Default

In addition, this converter allows you the choice of what voltage you have that needs to be converted. In your case, you would choose the highest voltage (you put a two prong pin that comes with the converter into the opening of the Featherweight's voltage). You choose the 110 volt output that you need for North America. You plug your machine in with the original British plug into the converter, and the converter gets plugged into the wall. Voila!
nuffsaid is offline  
Old 11-09-2017, 05:39 PM
  #5  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
lmc8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 268
Default

Thank you for responses, I tried a 100W transformer ordered from EBAY and it seems to function as it should now when it's switch is set to 230V.
lmc8 is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
FancyFoot
Pictures
292
04-11-2020 09:36 AM
craftybear
Links and Resources
0
02-04-2011 10:39 PM
welshgem
Main
6
08-05-2010 08:29 AM
bronnyb
Pictures
19
03-28-2010 02:42 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


FREE Quilting Newsletter


SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.