Safety of aging motor

Old 05-04-2018, 03:02 PM
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Default Safety of aging motor

I am making my first queen size quilt and would like to FMQ it on my Singer 66 Redeye. I looked up the number and it says it is a 95 made in 1913. I don't understand the 95, but my question is, are the electrics safe to use? The wiring looks good, though the plug is a big old looking thing. Any thoughts on plugging it in? Or why Ismacs says it's a 95.
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Old 05-04-2018, 03:57 PM
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So you have either a G29 (June 1913) or G33 (Dec 1913) serial number? The 95 is an industrial rotary hook model introduced in 1911. They look similar to a 66. I know Singer used the same decals on different machines, but industrials aren't my thing, so don't know if the 95 got Red Eyes.
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Old 05-04-2018, 05:33 PM
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Have you been using the machine recently or is this a new acquisition?
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Old 05-04-2018, 05:38 PM
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The # is G3357874 - maybe I looked it up incorrectly. It is on the top - my Redeye treadle is on the bottom. I deleted the Leader, but it won't leave, so ignore it. [ATTACH=CONFIG]593978[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]593981[/ATTACH]
Attached Thumbnails 100_0333.jpg   100_0207.jpg   100_0263.jpg  

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Old 05-04-2018, 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted by cashs_mom View Post
Have you been using the machine recently or is this a new acquisition?
I bought it several years ago at a quilt show for $5, but I've never plugged it in. I just don't know about old wiring, even though it looks good. The bigger harp would be nice for a bigger quilt. It has a nice bentwood case in very good condition, too.
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Old 05-04-2018, 06:22 PM
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Hmmm. . . I'd probably have an OSMG look at it for me. When my husband bought me a Featherweight, it looked realy good except for the cord. When I plugged it in, I went to take the plug out and it came off of the cord. I got a new one and had Kim go over it for me.
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Old 05-05-2018, 03:43 AM
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If you have the serial number correct ( I think you got a few rows off, I looked it up and get a 66 ) then your machine started out as non-electric with a back clamp foot. At some point the motor and light were added, and the presser foot bar has converted to side clamp.

Hard to tell how old your motor is, but for sure it's newer than the machine. From what I can see of the cord, I'd say it's been replaced at some point already. Usually the motors themselves are fine - or they simply don't work. Is that the foot pedal in the background? If so, that looks like one from around the 50's era, and it's not original Singer.
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Old 05-05-2018, 04:08 AM
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Like Macy writes, the motor and lights is a later addition, maybe a convertion at some point in the 1950s. The motor and light are safe when checked, it's mostly about the insulation on the wiring. Motors run lighter when lubricated, and your motor might have oil points. Some one of my 1950s Singers have oil points for the motor, very tiny pin holes near the motor bearings. My older machines have grease wicks and really should not be oiled at all. I have to admit, I have added a single drop of oil down the wick, just to soften up grease and hopefully something reaches the motor axle and bearings. It's a major crisis if the oil seeps along the motor axle and reaches the conductor parts, just one drop and maybe a second drop later on if the grease wicks are very clogged up. Don't do any more until the motor has been opened, then it can be properly cleaned and greased.

Motors can run hot, especially in summer. Take a break now and then. There was a lady who said she did one bobbin and had a few mintues brake before the next one, it seem to work well. I have spent hours with the machien with out much break at least two bobbins with sew all thread, 4 with top stitch weight, and not had any issue with heat, but I sew clothes and don't get the continuous running you get when quilting. Just have in mind the heat it normal but should be left to cool down before it gets unreasonably hot.

Pedals can have issues too and need sorting out, you will notice. There's quite a few threads on it. When the wiring is checked, capacitors in the pedal are removed, everything sorted out, the motors and pedals are up to todays electrical standards. Very few of them are grounded, most have double insulation even those with out the double square sign. You cannot use them in a wet room like the bath, laundry room or next to the kitchen sink

Last edited by Mickey2; 05-05-2018 at 04:14 AM.
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Old 05-05-2018, 04:59 AM
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You're right on the #. I looked it up as three 3s, not 2. So it is a 66, which makes sense. All the motor information makes me feel better. I sew on four machines from the 50s and two from the 70s, so that doesn't sound old to me. Now to plug it in! It moves very smoothly when you turn it by hand. I usually FMQ on a 301 with a vertical bobbin, but I will try this one for the increased harp space. Thank you, everyone.
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Old 05-05-2018, 05:51 AM
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On 50s and 60s machines I have the electrical has usually been fine, but 1920s and 30s machines with cloth covered wiring have been shockily bad; all the rubber insulation very stiff and crumbling. It's not always easy to check the conditon of cloth covered wiring, so don't trust it if it's old. Some have taken the bother to rewire with new cloth covered wiring, and there's always a chance a machine has new wiring. A 50s zigzagger I have needs a new ligth switch and the electrical sorted out, so alway check regardless of age. Even brand new appliances have short circuted in the worst of cases.
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