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Singer 306w bobbin thread path

Singer 306w bobbin thread path

Old 05-16-2018, 08:58 AM
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Default Singer 306w bobbin thread path

Hi!

I've recently started sewing in my home for a local small business as a night job. The owner loaned me a 319 to get started with and I've recently purchased a 1958 306w. The hook assembly in the 306 was noisy with a chatter that seemed extreme and different than the voice of the 319. I found this thread Singer 306K help very helpful and downloaded the service manual!

I found that the hook assembly position finger engages the slot in the hook assembly slightly differently between the 319 and the 306. On the 306, the tip of the finger is a few thousandths wider than the corresponding slot in the hook assembly. So, this can never be adjusted to a 0.020" gap as the service manual specifies. (On the 319, the tip of the finger can pass in/out of the slot for about 0.040" of depth with a couple thou of clearance on each side.) Also, it appears that the bobbin thread path out of the bobbin case passes to the left of the position finger and not under the tip of it in what is supposed to be the 0.020" gap.

If I adjust the finger such that the hook assembly body doesn't spin but the finger is tight enough to keep the bobbin thread under the tip, it won't sew without accumulating the stitches under the finger's tip and binding up the machine.

With the bobbin thread routing left of the finger, it sews exceptionally with one exception. I have to start the first stitch with a long thread tail because it sucks about 1.5" of it back down into the plate with the first machine motions. That seems strange and that (well, along with the clackety rattle) is what I'm trying to improve. Is this "left of finger" bobbin thread path standard in some machines?

I will post a picture. Thanks for any advice!!
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Old 05-16-2018, 03:22 PM
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Here are pictures. Where the (white) thread runs, there is an impression or channel in the hook assembly housing. So the thread runs out of the bobbin case, up the channel, and exits the plate on the left side of the oval hole. Is it okay that the thread doesn't run under the tip of the position finger like on the 319 I have? I really appreciate any opinions!
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Old 05-16-2018, 06:40 PM
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Welcome VARam1500.

I have both machines, but haven't really done much with either one. I do know that on most vintage machines the advice has always been to hold on to both threads when beginning to sew. One can sometimes get away with not doing that if you sew on a scrap of fabric after finishing a seam and leave the scrap attached. That leaves an anchor of sorts. Do you have manuals for either or both machines?

One of the manuals I have for the 306 says to "Lay both threads back under presser foot diagonally across feed ... so that when the presser foot is lowered the threads will be firmly held between the feed and the presser foot." I just hold the threads behind.

I know there are some differences in bobbin cases and much discussion about on some forums. I also know that there are some discussions about different bobbin cases and altering to be able to take a 15x1 versus the 206x13 needles that were the type of needles are the original needles used on these machines.

I don't know if it will answer your questions, but you might want to look at https://shop.sew-classic.com/Bobbin-...ils-173058.htm and https://shop.sew-classic.com/Singer-...ils-105032.htm that I found via https://shop.sew-classic.com/Bobbin-Cases-Parts_c23.htm

Good luck.

Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
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Old 05-20-2018, 06:16 AM
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My 301 has the same quirk, except I have to tightly hold back about 6" of thread.

Someone here (sorry, can't remember who), has a signature line, "needle down, foot down, sew."

I tried it, it works! Use the recommended threading, then give it a try and report back.
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Old 05-23-2018, 06:10 AM
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WIChix that is Gray fox. Actually, it is in many manuals, including 221, 301 and even the 306. Another tip in manuals is to lay the thread diagonally under the presser foot so that the thread ends are held firmly between the feed and the presser foot.


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Old 06-04-2018, 06:44 PM
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Thank you for the responses and links. I was able to see the bobbin case differences and confirm that I have a matching set.

For 306 users, does it matter which direction the bobbin is loaded into the carrier? Should the thread change direction as it exits under the carrier spring or not? I mean, if the case has the open side towards you and the spring is pointing counterclockwise, should the bobbin be loaded with thread clockwise or counterclockwise?
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Old 06-19-2018, 10:56 AM
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The 206, 306, and 319 machines were made to use 206X13 needles. If the machine hasn't been modified for 15X1
needles those timing tolerances will be off and you will have all kinds of problems. You can also damage the bobbin
case if using 15X1 needles. Even if they were modified I don't think they run as good as they do with 206X13
needles. You can still get 206X 13 needles on line. I would start there and see how things quiet down. If your
bobbin case has been damaged you should replace it. There were two kinds of bobbin case so make sure you
get the one for your machine. The operators manual will tell you that you must use the 206X13 needles.

If someone has tried to modify the timing or maybe put in the wrong bobbin case you will have fits with the machine.
Also the 206, 306, and 319 use their own special bobbin that you have to buy now online.

These are one of the few singer machines that took special needles, bobbins, and bobbin cases.
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Old 06-19-2018, 05:33 PM
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Did you get the bobbin threaded correctly? I should have pointed you to https://www.singer.com/support where you can find the manual at https://www.singer.com/sites/default...%20Machine.pdf

If you look on page 13 of the manual or the bottom of page 6 of the pdf, it will show how the bobbin is supposed to be threaded.

I am of the persuasion that one should not alter the machine to accept 15x1 needles, but I do understand why some might. From my understanding there are only two sizes (12 & 14, I think) available new.

Actually, I live in Denver so I could go to "Ralph's" which services, sells and has parts for industrial sewing machines, so I could just go there and buy a bobbin to fit.


Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
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Old 11-12-2018, 07:31 PM
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I use several 306s, having to hold the tail thread is standard, if you let the presser foot catch it, then the motor sometimes can't even start there is so much tension unless you give it a hand start. I like the idea above, "needle down, foot down, sew"

The clackety clack is either the hook, or the feed dogs. Make sure to give the lip between the two revolving parts of the hook a single drop of oil. While underneath, give the large, knurled hand screw a tighten with a screwdriver. Don't force it, it might not even seem like it moved. That often clears feed dog noise, as it is the adjustment screw. The lock screw for that large one is never touched in this procedure, somehow the large one seems to be able to back out ever so slightly, even with a lock screw.
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