Singer Touch and Sew

Old 11-27-2015, 12:04 PM
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Default Singer Touch and Sew

What model did singer start using the plastic gears? I had a chance to get a 603E but, didn't because I wasn't sure about the gears, got home looked it up and found out it had metal gears, so, I went back to get it the next day, and of course it was gone. It was like new. It was only $9.98. I have 15 sewing machines, but they are like potato chips, I just love them. 2 of mine are treadles and one is a hand crank.
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Old 11-27-2015, 01:39 PM
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The ones in treadles are very heavy on my digestion, much more so than potatoes.

If I have understood it correctly, a few of the early 600 numbers were all metal geared. The 600 and 603 are suppose to be metal. The 600 numbers were Singer's transition face, and it seems you have to check each machine for the plastic gears. The 626 and others have also been reported to be all metal, but some have the plastic gears. I have been looking into this too, since I have been interested in the bobbin functions of the touch and sew series.
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Old 11-27-2015, 02:04 PM
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I had a 758 at one time, and the gears had to be replaced. I love the way they sew. The bobbin winding is unique. Thanks for the info.
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Old 11-27-2015, 10:33 PM
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I have quite a few vintage machines with nylon gears. There is nothing wrong with nylon gears if they are in good shape, or if easily replaced. If it is a machine you want or are very interested in sometimes the gears or cam stack gears are worth being replaced.

My husband purchased a Pfaff 1222 because of all of the neat things it does, he loved the look of it, the feel of it, etc, and it is very very well made and uniquely designed into a small narrow space.

It has a small hairline crack in one of the design cams which is not a problem. It is still in very good sewing working condition. He repaired the machine which needed some major repairs and it sews perfectly. If the nylon cam cracks further or causes sewing problems he will replace it by ordering a new one. But for now the old one still works fine.

He gets a real kick using this machine and it is fun for him. As with san-sing, it has some unique features that makes it a fun to use and collectible keeper.

I guess what I am trying to say is don't discount machines just because they have nylon gears. They lasted many many years for the most part and maybe would have lasted longer if the machines hadn't been stored in a garage, shed or barn or abused. Take a bright flashlight and check out any nylon parts, if they pass inspection don't be afraid to buy it. JMHO

Now that our Pfaff 1222 purchased out of a cold/extreme hot storage unit where it sat for 11 YEARS!!! is in a nice controlled temperature home, all cleaned up and repaired we fully expect her to sew well for us for another 50 years. ( She will out live us at that point!)
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Old 11-28-2015, 03:32 AM
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Storage is a problem for vintage, both sewing machines and furniture. Once the new arrive a few years later any item will often gradually move away from the heated areas of the house to loft and cellars, eventually getting tossed out. Not all luckily.

I've been thinking much like you Sunflowerzz, mostly because of a few Berninas. The Bernina 500 numbers (and up) seem all to have a few white plastic gears and yet they have been my favorite to work on, particularly a 730. My Supermatic has a one or two plastic gears too, and after 50-60 years they are often still fine (their motor pulley is more of an issue). As long as it can be repaird and the repair is durable and dependable I don't mind too much either. That said, I like those all metal gear machines, like my Singer 201, it runs so smoothly :- )
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Old 11-28-2015, 07:23 AM
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My very favorite machine of all time was the Singer Touch & Sew 755. I am sure it had plastic gears but it sewed like a dream. I used it for everything and wish I still had it. It used cams and had the cutest little ducks. Nothing like the machines today but I did really like being able to wind the bobbin without taking it out of the machine.

I know there was a lot of issues with some of the 600 series. I think it was probably because in the later ones they had started using plastic gears and did not have them perfected.
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Old 11-28-2015, 08:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Mickey2 View Post
Storage is a problem for vintage, both sewing machines and furniture. Once the new arrive a few years later any item will often gradually move away from the heated areas of the house to loft and cellars, eventually getting tossed out. Not all luckily.

I've been thinking much like you Sunflowerzz, mostly because of a few Berninas. The Bernina 500 numbers (and up) seem all to have a few white plastic gears and yet they have been my favorite to work on, particularly a 730. My Supermatic has a one or two plastic gears too, and after 50-60 years they are often still fine (their motor pulley is more of an issue). As long as it can be repaird and the repair is durable and dependable I don't mind too much either. That said, I like those all metal gear machines, like my Singer 201, it runs so smoothly :- )
We totally agree I have mostly all metal in my collection and I LOVE them, my little 99K, my Pfaff 131 and my Featherweight to name just a few. I use them all for different reasons and different types of sewing. But I do try to help people understand that nylon/plastic does have its place also.

I sew daily on my new Juki, almost ALL plastic, computerized and push button. I love that machine. I will treat her like I do my trucks, when the repairs get too costly she will be traded in for a new model...LOL in the meantime all of my heavier sewing goes to my all metal "get her done machines"
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Old 11-28-2015, 08:22 AM
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Saw a Touch and Sew at SA near my house. It was in a cabinet. One of the workers was nearby. I asked out of curiosity only who priced the machines. She did. Asked why she priced the Touch and Sew at the price she did. $99.99. It's an antique. This was old but not antique/nor really vintage. It was a real mess and I asked her if we could plug it in. She stated they threw the cord away because it sparked and smoked. The veneer on the cabinet had evidently gotten caught at one point in a flood or type of water soak. No attachments much rust. Paint spilled/slopped on it. Just so sad to see machines in such shape. On the brighter side I found a darning egg for $1.00. Brought it home, smoothed it out and waxed it a little. Then darned 14 pair of socks for a homeless ministry.
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Old 11-28-2015, 08:22 AM
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Originally Posted by SingerSewer View Post
My very favorite machine of all time was the Singer Touch & Sew 755. I am sure it had plastic gears but it sewed like a dream. I used it for everything and wish I still had it. It used cams and had the cutest little ducks. Nothing like the machines today but I did really like being able to wind the bobbin without taking it out of the machine.

I know there was a lot of issues with some of the 600 series. I think it was probably because in the later ones they had started using plastic gears and did not have them perfected.

I have several T & S machines and YES I too love those machines and the bobbin! I luv luv luv the duckies and have several back up design cams....just in case. None of my other machines have such cute design cams. LOL
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Old 11-28-2015, 10:08 AM
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This has been a fun thread. Next time I see a Touch and Sew in the thrift store I'm going to snatch it up.LOL. There is a guy that buys all the machines in my area and makes tractors out of them, it just makes me sick, he will leave the cabinet and just get them to discount the machine. It is getting harder to find the older ones in good shape. Some of them price them too high, not knowing if they sew or not. I can repair some things but only minor problems. (belts, oil, grease and etc.) Thanks to all of you.
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