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Thread: Sticking my toe in the waters of Vintage Sewing Machines

  1. #51
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    Worked on the New Home machine over the weekend. Removed the rod that's locked up and now it's moving so smoothly...the bushing on the rod is still locked up, but it's soaking and hopefully it will loosen up so I can try to put it back together. It's amazing that everything else moves the way it does...again, waiting patiently.

  2. #52
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    Aw! I missed the pic of your DD that you posted on the 11th! Look how cute she is, and how proud!! Rightfully so, she did a great job!

    Good luck with your New Home....I have faith in ya!!
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  3. #53
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingweb View Post
    Worked on the New Home machine over the weekend. Removed the rod that's locked up and now it's moving so smoothly...the bushing on the rod is still locked up, but it's soaking and hopefully it will loosen up so I can try to put it back together. It's amazing that everything else moves the way it does...again, waiting patiently.
    I have a New Home like yours but mine is motorized. It has the same "locked up" problem. So it is sitting alongside the other problem children waiting for attention.
    Sweet Caroline

  4. #54
    Senior Member diamondee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlee View Post
    You're standing on a mightly slippery band whilst dipping that toe!

    (Psssssstttttt! Glenda is lying when she says we'll toss you a lift ring! We will however, cheer you on! )
    Now shes in the same boat we are

  5. #55
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    I was just so proud of myself for isolating the problem part. I actually feel like there's hope for this one. Right now the treadle spins almost silently, the machine...without the problem rod...spins perfectly...and the wheel does turn to the rear instead of the front like the other treadle...as someone here warned me...now, just to find a bobbin and bobbin case. I have my eye on a donor machine on CL...he he he. It's not as pretty as mine, but if it has the same innards, it could work, right?

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlee View Post
    Aw! I missed the pic of your DD that you posted on the 11th! Look how cute she is, and how proud!! Rightfully so, she did a great job!

    Good luck with your New Home....I have faith in ya!!
    Thanks Charlee...she loves that quilt. I quilted it on the long-arm for her. Crazy, but I think I was done with it by the following afternoon. (Don't tell anyone, but I used a old mattress pad for the batting...she loves how thick and heavy it is...)

  7. #57
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    OOps I did it again!

    My friend, on hearing me go on and on about treadle sewing machines, found another one for me on CL. $25. A White Rotary in a parlor cabinet...the cabinet fell apart as he and the seller were loading it into his truck. It's a dirty bugger, but it came with lots of attachments, a book, tools, etc. So, now there are 3 lined up in my garage in various states. My girls and I counted today...I think I'm up to 12. He's definitely an enabler. So, this poor fallen apart parlor cabinet...he thinks it should be easy enough to fix, but I'm not so sure. Wondering, if I want to try it out, should I be able to put it into a different cabinet? I suppose it depends on where the holes are drilled and the size of the base. Right now it's a bit of a dirty, linty mess, but everything seems to move.

  8. #58
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    Keep it up and you will soon have more than those twelve. I purchased my first vintage machine in July 2011. I now have over sixty. If your friend thinks he can save the parlor cabinet and is handy at woodworking, why don't you have him make you box to mount the head in so you can clean it and at least get it in working condition.
    Sweet Caroline

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caroline S View Post
    Keep it up and you will soon have more than those twelve. I purchased my first vintage machine in July 2011. I now have over sixty. If your friend thinks he can save the parlor cabinet and is handy at woodworking, why don't you have him make you box to mount the head in so you can clean it and at least get it in working condition.
    Oh no, he thinks it will be good experience for me to fix it up myself...Gee thanks. Right now I have it out of the cabinet and on a table so I can get to all the dirty insides.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingweb View Post
    Worked on the New Home machine over the weekend. Removed the rod that's locked up and now it's moving so smoothly...the bushing on the rod is still locked up, but it's soaking and hopefully it will loosen up so I can try to put it back together. It's amazing that everything else moves the way it does...again, waiting patiently.
    It's free! Now for some polishing...oh, and trying to remember how to put it back together!

  11. #61
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    So, I was at a thrift store a few days ago and I saw this cool cabinet. I keep thinking about it. There was a Singer of indeterminate age inside. There was all sorts of storage and it was really big. How do I know, on the fly, if the machine is any good? I mean, I can sew on it, see if it moves I suppose, but I don't know machines like all of you do. I have this Stylist that I want to set free because of its crumbling plastic gears and I was so charmed by it when I saw it...But then I think that I might just want it for the cabinet because it has such a big work surface and lots of drawers and an extra flap on the side just for thread and gadgets....this really is an obsession. I'm wondering if I could pop my other machine into or onto this cabinet...oh, I bet I could

  12. #62
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingweb View Post
    So, I was at a thrift store a few days ago and I saw this cool cabinet. I keep thinking about it. There was a Singer of indeterminate age inside. There was all sorts of storage and it was really big. How do I know, on the fly, if the machine is any good? I mean, I can sew on it, see if it moves I suppose, but I don't know machines like all of you do. I have this Stylist that I want to set free because of its crumbling plastic gears and I was so charmed by it when I saw it...But then I think that I might just want it for the cabinet because it has such a big work surface and lots of drawers and an extra flap on the side just for thread and gadgets....this really is an obsession. I'm wondering if I could pop my other machine into or onto this cabinet...oh, I bet I could
    If it was at a thrift store and the electrical looks OK they can usually plug it in for you to see if it works. If it is cheap enough buy it for the cabinet.
    Sweet Caroline

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caroline S View Post
    If it was at a thrift store and the electrical looks OK they can usually plug it in for you to see if it works. If it is cheap enough buy it for the cabinet.
    Enabler! oh, I mean, exactly what I was thinking!

  14. #64
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingweb View Post
    Enabler! oh, I mean, exactly what I was thinking!
    I don't think there are many non-enablers here on this board.
    Sweet Caroline

  15. #65
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    So...I have one machine, a New Home from the mid 1940-1950 range. Missing a bobbin and bobbin case. No longer locked up, but turns rather roughly right now. I may have to remove the rod again and polish it some more to make it move more smoothly in its bushings. I have a White that moves well, sews when I spin the hand-wheel, but no belt and the cabinet is limping along missing one of its wooden legs. Wouldn't it be nice if all the heads and cabinets were interchangeable? And the Minnehaha, oldest of all of them, is working just fine. I saw a table made out of treadle irons and thought...hey, I could cut a hole in that and drop a machine in...Couldn't I?

  16. #66
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    With its leg in place, the White sews like a dream. I was grinning from ear to ear when it started sewing. I figured out the threading and bobbin. I played with the attachments. It's so QUIET. I can't wait to move it into the house. A little more work on the cabinet and it's comin' inside!

  17. #67
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    I gifted my Singer Stylist 457 to a good home today. She already had the same machine and likes it so much, she wanted another and was willing to do the repairs (crumbled gears). I didn't want to bother with it and happy to see it go somewhere it would be appreciated.

  18. #68
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    Today I picked up a new machine...that sounds funny, but you know what I mean. A Franklin treadle in a parlor cabinet.Name:  WP_002093.jpg
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Size:  1.48 MB The machine looks like it's in really good condition, but the cabinet is in serious trouble. Wondering if I should be looking for a donor treadle. I'll try gluing and screwing this one together, but when the previous owner was trying to put it back together, she couldn't hold the machine and dropped it a couple times trying to get it back on the pins. I think that's what cracked the peddle and it looks like a piece or two are missing. I can understand why machines get orphaned.

  19. #69
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    I should post a picture, but I'm sure you'll get the idea...I had a leftover cabinet from the Stylist I gifted to someone else. She didn't want the cabinet, so I took the cabinet and added a shelf, right below the hole for the machine. My portable Kenmore fits right in it and I can lift the front flap, if needed to open my little tool compartment. I wonder if it will work for the Husky...probably not, but it works great and now the machine doesn't sit up so high. I'm reorganizing my sewing space, hoping I can find room for my treadles before cold weather hits. I don't want them sitting outside in the cold garage.

  20. #70
    Super Member pumpkinpatchquilter's Avatar
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    Hahaha I am enjoying your thread - I must subscribe and keep up with your purchases. I'm finding myself in the same boat. I have about 15 machines right now though I've turned down several free or near free machines due to lack of space. I'm trying to only take on ones that I KNOW I can fix or that are really neat for my collection. It's SO SO SO HARD though!
    Valerie Smith - pumpkinpatchquilter
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  21. #71
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    Oh yes, I know. I have a friend who just picked up a Singer treadle machine for me. I have not seen it yet, so...I'm looking forward to that. I think it was made around 1922. I have no idea of the model, its condition, or anything about it. So, I will have a New Home, a Franklin, a White and now a Singer..oh, and the little Minnehaha that started all of this. As for the electric machines, I have two Kenmores, a Husqvarna-Viking embroidery machine, a Bernette Serger, a Janome mini for one of my girls and the Necchi, a Singer 99, my Nolting Long-arm...seems I like diversity.

    Oh, and if I want to use the cabinet for the Husky, I cut an extra piece of the same wood I used for the shelf and it sits in the hole making the space level for the machine to sit. I used to sew at a table, but it was a bit high...this seems to work really well.

  22. #72
    Super Member pumpkinpatchquilter's Avatar
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    Sounds like you are building yourself quite a collection there!

    Can you tell me about the Necchi? I know they are popular little machines but don't know much about them. Are these ones that take cams?
    Valerie Smith - pumpkinpatchquilter
    Obsessed Quilter and APQS Long Arm Machine Quilter
    www.pumpkinpatchquilter.com

  23. #73
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    Yes. This one is from the 50s, not sure the precise date, but it came complete with all the accessories, feet, cams, a cool box for the cams that shows the stitch, the cams and the order they should be stacked. It's a really nice machine, works really well, and the man that I bought it from said his mother bought it and used it as long as he can remember and had it serviced often. $50. I was so excited to see it and had a lot of fun trying out all the stitches. There were even hand typed notes from the owner. It is a BU Supernova....I think that's right. It's my "downstairs" machine. I joined a Necchi group on Yahoo, but I know very little other than Necchi owners are very dedicated to their machines. I just think it's cool.Name:  WP_001751.jpg
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  24. #74
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    Can I just say? I love it here!

  25. #75
    Super Member pumpkinpatchquilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingweb View Post
    Can I just say? I love it here!
    Hahaha - me too!!! The vintage quilter's especially are a SUPER helpful and generous bunch. I have learned SO much info on this site. It used to be a lot harder to get quick access to old sewing machine info too. The nice thing here (especially now that it's more than just one thread devoted to old machines) is there is such a large volume of people visiting you can get a pretty accurate answer to just about anything fast! Not to mention, the people are just really great.

    That machine just LOOKS awesome! Now you know it's on the list of wants...thanks for sharing!! I'm just fascinated with these "cam" machines. It's a totally new concept to me but my Mother has a Kenmore that takes cams and she loves it.
    Valerie Smith - pumpkinpatchquilter
    Obsessed Quilter and APQS Long Arm Machine Quilter
    www.pumpkinpatchquilter.com

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