Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums >
  • Main
  • For Vintage & Antique Machine Enthusiasts
  • Warning on Vintage Brother Machines!!! >
  • Warning on Vintage Brother Machines!!!

  • Warning on Vintage Brother Machines!!!

    Old 01-09-2014, 11:01 AM
      #21  
    Super Member
     
    Join Date: Aug 2013
    Location: Springfield Oregon
    Posts: 1,481
    Default

    Originally Posted by Candace
    You should be o.k. with this model as it doesn't seem to have cams for different stitches. The later machines with the built in embroidery stitches seem to be the worst culprits for broken parts:< But, yes the top should come off somehow. It may be held on with the knobs or dials on top that are removed first. If it's never been serviced, it really should be...
    Trust me, the whole housing is one solid piece, no seperate topcover. But no plastic gears either. And it works great and is fast and smooth. It's in great shape and I just bought an unopened package of accessories from 1961 for a Brother with receipt (for a different machine). She is also center homing needle.
    oldsewnsew is offline  
    Old 01-09-2014, 11:21 AM
      #22  
    Super Member
    Thread Starter
     
    Join Date: Jan 2010
    Location: Outer Space
    Posts: 9,319
    Default

    Originally Posted by oldsewnsew
    Trust me, the whole housing is one solid piece, no seperate topcover. But no plastic gears either. And it works great and is fast and smooth. It's in great shape and I just bought an unopened package of accessories from 1961 for a Brother with receipt (for a different machine). She is also center homing needle.
    Yours may be one of the last good ones. Because the style of it looks similar to the ones a bit later, that have the different stitches and yucky parts.
    Candace is offline  
    Old 01-09-2014, 11:22 AM
      #23  
    Super Member
    Thread Starter
     
    Join Date: Jan 2010
    Location: Outer Space
    Posts: 9,319
    Default

    Originally Posted by J Miller
    oldsewnsew,

    OK, you got me. It sure looked like it had a top in the first pics.

    Plastic gears and grease - I've had and still do have a number of Singers and others with plastic gears. With one exception; a Kenmore Sensor Sew 100, every machine with plastic gears had grease on the gears. Some was an amber color, some was icky black, some was whitish. But all had greased gears.

    So, on those I've cleaned and serviced I use Tri-Flow or the white Singer gear lube.

    Joe
    Yes, most of the Singers I've had have had this too. However most of the European machines I've received are typically clean...no grease on the nylon gears. Occasionally, there is an exception, but most Bernina, Pfaff and Elna techs don't grease the nylon gears or nylon parts.

    Last edited by Candace; 01-09-2014 at 11:25 AM.
    Candace is offline  
    Old 01-09-2014, 08:40 PM
      #24  
    Senior Member
     
    Join Date: Oct 2012
    Location: NW IL
    Posts: 493
    Default

    Originally Posted by J Miller
    oldsewnsew,

    OK, you got me. It sure looked like it had a top in the first pics.

    Plastic gears and grease - I've had and still do have a number of Singers and others with plastic gears. With one exception; a Kenmore Sensor Sew 100, every machine with plastic gears had grease on the gears. Some was an amber color, some was icky black, some was whitish. But all had greased gears.

    So, on those I've cleaned and serviced I use Tri-Flow or the white Singer gear lube.

    Joe
    Same here all ones with plastic gears had grease on there gears. Some of the older machines had there service stickers on them still. Yes some of the grease was brown, off white, inky black and a few harden up grease. And on those I didn't notice any cracks or damage on the gears. Like Joe I replaced it with Singer grease lube.
    caroloto is offline  
    Old 01-09-2014, 08:46 PM
      #25  
    Senior Member
     
    Join Date: Oct 2012
    Location: NW IL
    Posts: 493
    Default

    Originally Posted by Candace
    Yes, most of the Singers I've had have had this too. However most of the European machines I've received are typically clean...no grease on the nylon gears. Occasionally, there is an exception, but most Bernina, Pfaff and Elna techs don't grease the nylon gears or nylon parts.
    Here the old Bernina, Pfaff and Elna and even Vikings that were sold by local sewing shops the plastic gears have been greased while being serviced.

    Maybe even back then they were told to grease or not to grease the plastic gears???
    caroloto is offline  
    Old 01-11-2014, 07:39 AM
      #26  
    Super Member
     
    ThayerRags's Avatar
     
    Join Date: May 2011
    Location: Frederick, OK
    Posts: 2,031
    Default

    I guess somebody should hit me square between the eyes with a Quilting Board.

    A friend’s (newer) Brother LS-2125i got thread tangled up in the thread take-up lever linkage, and I foolishly decided to try to remedy the situation. Naturally, the pot-metal lever link snapped in two while I was messing with it. The chances of finding a new part to replace it is slim to none. When will I learn?

    CD in Oklahoma
    ThayerRags is offline  
    Old 01-11-2014, 07:52 AM
      #27  
    Super Member
     
    mlmack's Avatar
     
    Join Date: May 2013
    Location: Kansas City, MO
    Posts: 1,382
    Default

    Originally Posted by ThayerRags
    I guess somebody should hit me square between the eyes with a Quilting Board.

    A friend’s (newer) Brother LS-2125i got thread tangled up in the thread take-up lever linkage, and I foolishly decided to try to remedy the situation. Naturally, the pot-metal lever link snapped in two while I was messing with it. The chances of finding a new part to replace it is slim to none. When will I learn?

    CD in Oklahoma
    I have very little, if any, confidence in the newer machines. It's probably cheaper to replace the whole machine than it would be to fix them.
    mlmack is offline  
    Old 01-11-2014, 08:50 AM
      #28  
    Super Member
    Thread Starter
     
    Join Date: Jan 2010
    Location: Outer Space
    Posts: 9,319
    Default

    Originally Posted by ThayerRags
    I guess somebody should hit me square between the eyes with a Quilting Board.

    A friend’s (newer) Brother LS-2125i got thread tangled up in the thread take-up lever linkage, and I foolishly decided to try to remedy the situation. Naturally, the pot-metal lever link snapped in two while I was messing with it. The chances of finding a new part to replace it is slim to none. When will I learn?

    CD in Oklahoma
    They're known for having weak metal. So much so, that the needle bar bends before the needle breaks. And that should not happen!
    Candace is offline  
    Old 02-09-2023, 09:57 PM
      #29  
    Member
     
    Nana51's Avatar
     
    Join Date: Dec 2019
    Location: Oklahoma
    Posts: 22
    Default

    Do you happen to know anything about the Brother Galaxie 1361? Sure is a pretty model. Yellow and olive .
    Nana51 is offline  
    Old 02-21-2023, 01:25 PM
      #30  
    Junior Member
     
    Join Date: Jan 2014
    Posts: 160
    Default

    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again:

    3D printing.

    I’ve salvaged many machines with “plastic” parts by simply designing and printing new parts. Nylon printing is a standard job. I prefer ABS myself. Nylon is anhydrous, which makes printing tricky if the filament isn’t totally dry.

    I’m actually running some abs change gears in my metal lathe as we speak. Couple hundred hours on them, no signs of wear. They run between metal gears and the addition of the abs gears makes the whole machine much quieter and more pleasant to be around when running. Should they fail, pop a tooth or otherwise just wear out, an call up the file, an hour or two running on the 3d printer and I’m up and running again.

    These days, I feel everyone should have a 3d printer in the house somewhere: its like having a Star Trek “replicator” at your disposal. Slower, but it does often seem like it makes things out of thin air.

    I have also been known to machine out new gears in aluminum, but thats more involved snd much more expensive.

    The thing is, just because a machine has a broken plastic piece doesn’t mean its worthoess. These days, there are oots of options to fix them.

    The only machines I turn away are the newer ones where the entire body (and drive parts) are plastic. Those were designed as “throw away” items and thats pretty much all they’re good for. Too much to fix on them. Now, an older machine with a csst aluminum body is a different story. When they get a broken plastic piece, its worth fixing them as they often have more modern features that you just can’t get in a 1930’s-1950’s machine. I’d say a out mid 1980’s is right about where the machines are just nit worth building new parts for.

    Of course, thats a different story if you’re talking about a modern machine you paid a few grand for. Thise are usually worth making parts for, assuming you can’t still buy replacement parts for them…

    Last edited by great white; 02-21-2023 at 01:31 PM.
    great white is offline  
    Related Topics
    Thread
    Thread Starter
    Forum
    Replies
    Last Post
    butterflywing
    General Chit-Chat (non-quilting talk)
    20
    10-20-2011 04:58 PM
    danandsassy
    For Vintage & Antique Machine Enthusiasts
    17
    05-14-2011 06:26 AM
    madamekelly
    General Chit-Chat (non-quilting talk)
    14
    09-16-2010 11:14 AM

    Posting Rules
    You may not post new threads
    You may not post replies
    You may not post attachments
    You may not edit your posts

    BB code is On
    Smilies are On
    [IMG] code is On
    HTML code is Off
    Trackbacks are Off
    Pingbacks are Off
    Refbacks are Off


    FREE Quilting Newsletter