What is this?

Old 05-19-2018, 04:20 AM
  #21  
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I used a magic eraser on my motorcycle pipes to remove some plastic that got melted & then burned onto them. I was tentative about using it, not knowing if it would leave scratches, but it didn’t. I’d be Leary of using one on a painted & finished surface. Wow-using one on a child?!? Who would think that’s a good idea?
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Old 05-19-2018, 05:40 AM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by Mickey2 View Post
Did you get any where with it bkay? A resin type car polish with the gritty stuff can lift up dirt and grime like this from the finish. If you go to a place with a good selection of car polishes, there's some stuff called "rubber", "rubbing" or something like that, it's a product they use when they polish up cars thoroughly. It's usually in paste form on a tube, it depends upon brand and product. Some proucts are called lacquer cleaners, and they have the fine gritty polishing component that gentely polishes off stubbern grime and staining. There's lots of this stuff available when you find the right store. I'm mostly thinking of the stuff meant for cars, made to restore dull and discolored finishes.
I think you mean 'rubbing compound'? That might work well. I hadn't thought of that. If you want something a bit gentler to try first, there's clay bar. Clay bar will take off a lot of surface problems without harming the paint. We use it on the cars all the time to remove surface contaminants without harm to the paint job. You'll also need a detail spray to use with it. It might be worth a try.

As far as it being rust goes, that's possible. But rust coming up from underneath so it shows on top often bubbles. That's hard to mistake for anything but rust.

Last edited by cashs_mom; 05-19-2018 at 05:43 AM.
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Old 05-19-2018, 05:18 PM
  #23  
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I found some info on magic erasers here: https://www.yourmechanic.com/article...r-by-kevin-woo
Quote: "Magic Erasers are made from melamine foam. When a Magic Eraser gets wet, its abrasiveness is the equivalent of 3000 to 5000 grit sandpaper, depending on how hard you scrub. That might not sound very rough, but on car paint the damage could be severe. Worse, if you have a heavy hand and go to town with a bone dry Magic Eraser, it would be similar to using 800 grit sandpaper. In either case, using a Magic Eraser to clean a spot on your car (or in this case, sewing machine) will scratch the paint."Here's more on melamine foam from Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melamine_foam

I don't have a clue what those spots are on that machine. Is it also on the other side, do you know? Since the back would be the "up" side if the machine was in a cabinet, the discoloration could have come from exposure to something while in the cabinet if it's just on one side. Is it a cast iron or aluminum machine? If there is an inconspicuous place, you could carefully try a tiny spot of rust remover like Must for Rust and see how it affects the paint. Or have you tried the old cleaning standby: sewing machine oil?
Andy Tube channel on YouTube has some good advice on using automobile cleaners and waxes on sewing machines.
It's a nice machine, hope you can make it look all nice and gleaming again!
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Old 12-04-2020, 09:41 AM
  #24  
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I am terribly sorry for bumping an old thread like this, but If anyone could give advice I would be grateful. See, I have been selling these old sewing machines and many times I had problems with mold. Some people let these rot in some shed, and they do not know that there is money to be made of them. A Few months ago I found an old model and I tried cleaning it, but mold just comes back the next day. I found an article online where they are talking about mold and in one part of that article they say how there are professionals that can get rid of it. I really have tried everything, if I do this and it does not work I will lose money. Does anyone have experience with companies like this, will it work?
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Old 12-04-2020, 10:09 AM
  #25  
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Can professionals get it off?
Originally Posted by Smorko View Post
I am terribly sorry for bumping an old thread like this, but If anyone could give advice I would be grateful. See, I have been selling these old sewing machines and many times I had problems with mold. Some people let these rot in some shed, and they do not know that there is money to be made of them. A Few months ago I found an old model and I tried cleaning it, but mold just comes back the next day. I found an article online where they are talking about mold and in one part of that article they say how there are professionals that can get rid of it. I really have tried everything, if I do this and it does not work I will lose money. Does anyone have experience with companies like this, will it work?https://www.damagecontrol-911.com/se...ld-remediation/
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Old 12-06-2020, 08:58 AM
  #26  
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When we bought this place, it came with a truck because the owner had died and no one would claim the estate because they were afraid he had debts all over town. We live in a rain forest so after 3 years, let your imagination run as to how much mold there was inside. My husband started researching because the truck was worth $5,000. - $10,000. Well vinegar kills mold. He has sprayed the whole interior. Now I must admit I have not been in it but his son said it is fine. There is no evidence of new growth and we have had lots of rain and temperatures done to freezing. He said mix the vinegar 1/2 and 1/2 with water. Donít know if this could get under the paint and if you let it sit for a period of time I donít know if it would damage the paint. Vinegar is an acid.
Good luck and please let us know how things turn out.

Last edited by Kelsie; 12-06-2020 at 09:03 AM.
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Old 12-06-2020, 01:46 PM
  #27  
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1 quart hot water, 1TBL baking soda, 2TBL washing soda, 2TBL TSP. I use this all the time to kill mildew and that algae that grows on house siding. Wear gloves because it drys out you skin. Once the surface is clean, wipe down one more time with the solution and let air dry. That will prevent regrowth.
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Old 12-12-2020, 11:41 AM
  #28  
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You will probably have to polish it off with a fine auto polish or plastic windshield polish. I have rubbed out a lot of stuff like that with car wax or cleaner. As long as you don't have decals on the machine you can rub them a lot.
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Old 12-12-2020, 12:19 PM
  #29  
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Like everyone else I believe it is mold of some kind. This machine looks like it might need a total restore to get rid of this. Is the machine in running condition?
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Old 12-21-2020, 08:20 AM
  #30  
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There are so many machines out there that machines in this condition is no more than parts to myself. Would be different if it was a rare model. Definitely not worth the work with so many similar models widely available
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