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Thread: 1940 White Rotary Sewing machine with cabinet

  1. #1
    Senior Member auniqueview's Avatar
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    I may be going to look at one tomorrow. It is supposed to sew well, has a manual, maple cabinet. The manual has the number 49 in large type on the front. Can anyone tell me anything about it?

  2. #2
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    you might ask in the vintage sewing machines section http://www.quiltingboard.com/virtual...jsp?vsnum=1013

  3. #3
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    This machine can work well as a treadle. You can Google the Treadle-On group to find more information.

    Personally, I find these machines in cabinets way too heavy. The only way I would be tempted is if it's a working treadle.

    In thrift shops around here, this type of machine would sell for about $30 (if it's not a treadle). Cabinet machines tend not to be as popular as vintage portables just because they are harder to transport. And the heavier old ones like this tend to be even less popular because of their weight. A treadle would sell for more -- up to maybe $150.

    You can convert these from electric to treadle, but you have to hunt up the parts and do conversion work.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by auniqueview
    I may be going to look at one tomorrow. It is supposed to sew well, has a manual, maple cabinet. The manual has the number 49 in large type on the front. Can anyone tell me anything about it?
    They are nice machines and are really well made. Most of the ones like what your looking at were friction drive meaning the motor had a rubber wheel that rode against the handwheel to power it. Sometimes they had provisions for the external motor but most didnt. So if you decide to make it human powered it will take a little doing. But all in all the parts are still out there and if you can get in it cheap enough and you like it by all means get it!!

    Nothing sews better than a well built American made sewing machine!

    Billy

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