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Thread: Advice for recreating a heavy tied old fashion style quilt

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cashs_mom View Post
    That's true, bear. When I was growing up we had a favorite sit on the the floor in front of the TV quilt made of samples of velveteen upholstery fabrics in large rectangles. It was a tied quilt and much used. When it was getting lumpy from the "batt" starting to come apart and shift, my mom decided to take it apart and repair it. When she took the binding off, there was an old wool blanket inside.

    My mother was raised in a rural area of the midwest in the twenties and said that they always sandwiched old quilts in new fabric to make new quilts. They also cut up the boys old wool trousers in strips to use for log cabin type quilts as the wool was heavy and warm (no central heat in those old farm houses!) and there was no money to buy new batting.

    I'm pretty sure it was how quilts where made here in Canada too.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    Since you have a longarm, I might pre quilt a heavy backing fabric with all your leftover batting in a simple 4 inch grid pattern. I would then sew a simple or do a whole cloth top. I would put the top with a polyester batt under it underneath of prepared backing and use the long arm to tack the layers together following the 4 inch grid pattern already on the backing. You could tie tack yarn at the 4 inch corners and then tie the ends after for a pretend yarn tie effect.
    Oh, I like this idea. Thank you Tartan!

  3. #13
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    You could use denim and corduroy with warm and natural batting.And cotton velveteen.

  4. #14
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    Or get old wool garments (if you can) - wash them - wash colors separately in case some are bleeders - and then cut them up.

  5. #15
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    Can you find an army blanket? Those are super warm and super heavy and make a great batting.
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

  6. #16
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    I would keep as close to the picture he likes as possible. If you use corduroy or corduroy and denim with a flannel backing, it will be heavy with a cotton batting. Keep it as easy as possible for him to wash. The picture you show reminds me of a grandma quilt. If possible, don't make the rectangles smaller. It will spoil the look he likes.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadQuilter View Post
    Can you find an army blanket? Those are super warm and super heavy and make a great batting.
    Yes, I buy them at the thrift store and love them for potholders. But I'm afraid it would be too hard to care for; I find that I have to steam and put my potholder back to shape after washing them. Don't know how I would handle a queen size quilt.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Genden View Post
    I would keep as close to the picture he likes as possible. If you use corduroy or corduroy and denim with a flannel backing, it will be heavy with a cotton batting. Keep it as easy as possible for him to wash. The picture you show reminds me of a grandma quilt. If possible, don't make the rectangles smaller. It will spoil the look he likes.
    I was thinking of making them larger, in fact. But I agree, it looks like a grandma quilt. The lady used a layer cake of woolies flannel I think. This material is wonderful and looks like wool (but is soft and thick). Unfortunately the young man can afford this material, I have to thrift something.

  9. #19
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    Wonderful quilt in the picture. It looks like old shirts cut up for the blocks. I buy shirts from thrift shops to make these kinds of quilts. A thrift shop blanket would be great batting and I would back with flannel.
    Retired USN Senior Chief

  10. #20
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    I think I would do the simple blocks like in the picture and use a double bat of cotton (bottom) and then wool with maybe a flannel or nice muslin backing. The double bat will be heavy enough for him and plenty warm too.

    I'd use the long arm to tack it down and then tie it. I've tied 2 t-shirt quilts and it can be a bit of a pain---have a pair of needle nose pliers to pull that needle if it get's stuck.

    Or you could just machine quilt a grid pattern and then tie about center of your blocks (or every other if 6" of smaller) and it would be that tied quilt but also have a machine grid stand up to the washing and give you an easier quilt to tie with.

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