Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Another Applique question. Turned or Raw

  1. #1
    Senior Member familyfun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    597
    Hello everyone. I have came back for somemore advice form the experts. I started my dear jane quilt yesturday and have 14 blocks done. I started with the easy one first and used pp.
    I am not good at applique. I threw away my first two projects because they looked terrible. I decided to do machine applique on a dj block and I think it looks horrible so I watched somemore videos on line and thought I would raw fray edge a couple of them. I was wondering if you think it will cause a problem in the future. I have no idea how well it holds up. I dont see this quilt being washed everyweek. But over time how well does fray edge stay. I used a very small stich 1.2
    For some reason my machine would not do the applique stich it was putting a zag in it. So I decided to straight stitch. What do you all think ?
    I am also going to post other blocks on pic page

    Machine applique with messed up stitching
    Name:  Attachment-179161.jpe
Views: 99
Size:  53.1 KB

    raw edge
    Name:  Attachment-179162.jpe
Views: 54
Size:  94.9 KB

    another raw edge
    Name:  Attachment-179163.jpe
Views: 61
Size:  56.9 KB

  2. #2
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,108
    Blog Entries
    1
    The stitch with the "zig" in it will hold up longer than the frayed edge will IMHO
    I stitch right alongside the edge of the applique and then let the zig go over onto the applique piece. I like how it looks done this way and it protects the edges better, again JMHO :D:D:D

    Here are some videos on applique, you may find them helpful
    http://www.critterpat.com/content.php?content_id=1007

  3. #3
    Super Member dream56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Indiana, PA
    Posts
    1,404
    Blog Entries
    1
    I like either the turned edge with stitching or a satin stitch around - like Amma said too loose of stitching around raw edge won't hold up as long.

  4. #4
    Super Member earthwalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    9,261
    I prefer to applique by hand, turning the edge under. I can't see the raw edge holding up well at all and imho could blur the edges of the design.

  5. #5
    Super Member jayelee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Chaumont NY
    Posts
    1,174
    I raw edge applique but I use Heat and Bond lite and a blanket stitch

  6. #6
    Senior Member familyfun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    597
    Thank you for your replies. I think I will go back to the drawing board and redo these blocks.

  7. #7
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sturbridge, Ma
    Posts
    4,017
    are you using a template with either a no melt plastic or other template material to turn your edges over. Perfect Shape from The Stencil Co or Templar (ususlly found in shops) is a method to turn edges and press them down. This gives a nice crisp edge. There is also a method using freezer paper or a pellon type material. This is good to use whether you do by hand or machine.
    Also, straight stitch or raw edge, to me, would be out of character of the ret of the Dear Jane quilt as the style is mide 1800's.

  8. #8
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    9,545
    normally a fusable product is used when doing raw-edge applique- that is why it is not turned under- and the fusable protects those edges- after fusing to the background a satin stitch or blind hem stitch or zigzag is usually used to go around the block. the fusable keeps the edges from fraying and pulling away with wear and laundering
    if you do not want to use a fusable another way to do it would be to use either lightweight muslin or tule...place right sides together= stitch around the applique piece- cut a slit into the muslin (or tule) and turn the block so the muslin is on the back and you have a finished edge on your applique pieces. then you can stitch them down any way you want to with no raw edges.

  9. #9
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Albany, Oregon
    Posts
    10,701
    You are so brave, attempting a DJ quilt. I do think that you would be happier, in the long run, if you practice your needle turn applique and use it for the DJ quilt, which is a showcase for really intricate blocks. Find someone who does really good needle turn and ask them to help you perfect yours. Don't get me wrong, because I have seen many quilts that were gorgeous with raw edge applique, or machine applique. I just don't think I would use those methods on the DJ.

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,689
    Blog Entries
    1
    I also have used Heat n Bond for applique. This is how I learned to do applique. I use the zig zag satin stitch on my machine and the quilts have been washed with no problems. My machine also has the applique stitch that I have used on quilts and wallhangings. The stitches you have used are wonderful for wallhangings. They add texture and character. I think you are doing what all 'learners' do, so you are on your way! It takes lots of block scraps and different edges of applique and practice. You may even come up with your own signature stitch and technique. I personally wouldn't do the main project until you have the stitch you are looking for. (It is no fun ripping stitches or having to discard anything. Also, those 'throwaways' can be used toward doll quilts, scrap quilts, dog beds, etc.) For quilts that take a lot of use, especially childrens, it would be beneficial to take the time to learn to do needle turning. The edges of the applique are more secure, and if the project is a gift, you wouldnt have to be concerned about the receiver washing it.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.