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Thread: any recommendations for a child's sewing machine?

  1. #1
    Super Member katkat1946's Avatar
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    My granddaughter has watched Grammy sew and her mom's been picking it up a little and now she wants to have a machine. She's only 6 but as with ALL of our grandchildren, she seems very capable. She'll be frustrated unless she can actually sew two pieces of fabric together but I'm hoping there's a child's machine that won't have the force to sew right through her finger :oops: Any suggestions will be so appreciated.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Plumtree's Avatar
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    I recently started teaching quilting at our homeschool co-op and needed to get 5 machines. I went with Janome brand because my person machine is a Janome and I trust it.

    I got 5 Janome 3128 from Hancock fabrics, they were on sale for $89 each, great price when you need 5.
    4 of the 5 worked one didn't and had to get a Janome 5128 also from Hancocks, this one was $139;also on sale.

    They are both great learning machines but the 5128 is better for kids. The 3128 is constantly losing the thread in the "hammer" and constantly comes unthreaded if you don't pull a "long tail", both of these are very frustrating to littles.

    The 5128 doesnt' seem to have the issue with the hammer losing thread but also needs a long tail. It is able to drop the feed dogs and has a top loading bobbin instead of a side loading bobbin which the 3128 has--this is really hard for little fingers to get in place.

    My daughter who is 12 likes the 5128 better than the 3128.

    Good Luck

    I know I love teaching these littles a new craft and my own daughter loves sewing with me too.

    Tammy

  3. #3
    cls
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    I agree about the Janome...both are good machines. A good time to get her started...quiltingcher

  4. #4
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    When I was teaching kids, I really would have liked the option of slowing down the speed at least at first. I had one little boy-10yr old, who thought it was cool that when you stomped on the foot pedal all the way to the floor it sounded like a race car. I quickly moved him to my expensive machine and set the stitch speed waaaay down.

  5. #5
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by katkat1946
    My granddaughter has watched Grammy sew and her mom's been picking it up a little and now she wants to have a machine. She's only 6 but as with ALL of our grandchildren, she seems very capable. She'll be frustrated unless she can actually sew two pieces of fabric together but I'm hoping there's a child's machine that won't have the force to sew right through her finger :oops: Any suggestions will be so appreciated.
    Get her a good machine. Teach her to not get her finger under the needle. Getting a machine small enough and lightweight enough that it won't put a needle thru a finger also means it probably won't be much of a machine and will be frustrating to use. Millions of kids learned to sew on their mom's Singer and lived to tell about it with all 10 fingers intact.

  6. #6
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    Get her a good machine. Teach her to not get her finger under the needle. Getting a machine small enough and lightweight enough that it won't put a needle thru a finger also means it probably won't be much of a machine and will be frustrating to use. Millions of kids learned to sew on their mom's Singer and lived to tell about it with all 10 fingers intact.
    ditto on this advice.

  7. #7
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    I thing the Bernina Bernette's are a great starter machine. The cost is reasonable and they're simple. Bernina also makes a "finger guard" that can be place on it.

    My second choice would be a Kenmore (most are made by Janome).

    Does she want to make clothing, doll clothes or quilts? I usually choose a machine by its purpose.

  8. #8
    Senior Member shnnn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    Quote Originally Posted by katkat1946
    My granddaughter has watched Grammy sew and her mom's been picking it up a little and now she wants to have a machine. She's only 6 but as with ALL of our grandchildren, she seems very capable. She'll be frustrated unless she can actually sew two pieces of fabric together but I'm hoping there's a child's machine that won't have the force to sew right through her finger :oops: Any suggestions will be so appreciated.
    Get her a good machine. Teach her to not get her finger under the needle. Getting a machine small enough and lightweight enough that it won't put a needle thru a finger also means it probably won't be much of a machine and will be frustrating to use. Millions of kids learned to sew on their mom's Singer and lived to tell about it with all 10 fingers intact.
    :thumbup: I started my daughter and one of her friends on my vintage sewing machines when they were 6. They are very careful to stay away from the needle and go very slow. and, the metal machines have the benefit of holding a magnetic seam guide. We tried one of those childs machines... I fought with it for about an hour and couldn't make it work right - so in the trash it went.

  9. #9
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I agree with getting her a 'real' machine. Don't bother with a toy or child's version. I'd also stick with the same brand as the one you have. You will be somewhat familiar with how it operates.

  10. #10
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    an inexpensive brother machine with speed control-
    my youngest granddaughter was 4 when she started sewing- the $89 brother's from wally world have speed control so i could turn it way slow-
    set up on her little carebear table & chairs so everything was within her reach- was very usable for her-
    all of the girls learned on brother's - she was the youngest i had use one though- and it was great.
    i would recommend an inexpensive brother machine for any new sewer- regardless of age.

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