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Thread: backing question

  1. #1
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    I am a newbie and doing my first lap quilt. When doing backing, how should u sew two pieces together to have enough for the whole back. Do u just sew a seam down the middle? Will that add too much stress?

  2. #2
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    Hi Mona, there is a teaching about backings by John Flynn that should be helpful for you.

    http://flynnquilt.com/media/uploads/...onalpb1103.pdf


    Pam M

    Quilt Backing Info by John Flynn

  3. #3
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    Thank you, I will check it out and see if I can do it! Wish me luck.

  4. #4
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mona202
    Thank you, I will check it out and see if I can do it! Wish me luck.
    I checked it out but it shows more how to figure out how much you need and I was looking more for HOW to do the backing. Do I sew just one seam down the middle or should I cut it in thirds and have two seams down the back? I have the quilt top laid out on the floor on top of the backing fabric and I have enough with 1 inch borders around it. What do you do or how do you do it?

  5. #5
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    There are many ways to do the back. I've pieced down the middle with great results...no issues with stress on the seam. Usually I will add blocks or a section with a contrasting fabric and stretch my backing fabric, which is great if you're a little short. Some people put a seam down both sides of the selvedge, then cut one piece in the middle. This gives a fabric's width in the center and 2 narrow strips on either side.

    I've looked into the diagonal method before and it required more thinking than I wanted to do. ;)

  6. #6
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
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    They say to avoid sewing a seam down the middle. I like to use a center piece with borders for the backing. Or, you can do the 3 panel method with wider in middle & narrow on either side.

  7. #7
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    The traditional method is to use two lengths (fabric the length of the quilt). Split one in half lengthwise, then sew a half to each side of the uncut length. This results in the back having two seams. Traditionally a single seam down the middle has been avoided.

    The Flynn method shows how to achieve a similar result with less than 2 lengths of fabric (saves on fabric cost). To be honest, I just can't seem to stay with his explanation long enough to actually use it.

  8. #8
    rb.
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    John Flynn's method is most advantageous for someone quilting on a frame, where you don't want the added bulk of a seam rolling on in the same place, causing a loss of space.

  9. #9
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    Thanks all. You gave me just what I needed.

  10. #10
    Senior Member darlin121's Avatar
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    I like the three panel method myself, but lately I've been piecing the back with alot of smaller leftover pieces from the front. It makes it more interesting, I think.

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