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Thread: backing question

  1. #1
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    I am a newbie and doing my first lap quilt. When doing backing, how should u sew two pieces together to have enough for the whole back. Do u just sew a seam down the middle? Will that add too much stress?

  2. #2
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    Hi Mona, there is a teaching about backings by John Flynn that should be helpful for you.

    http://flynnquilt.com/media/uploads/...onalpb1103.pdf


    Pam M

    Quilt Backing Info by John Flynn

  3. #3
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    Thank you, I will check it out and see if I can do it! Wish me luck.

  4. #4
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mona202
    Thank you, I will check it out and see if I can do it! Wish me luck.
    I checked it out but it shows more how to figure out how much you need and I was looking more for HOW to do the backing. Do I sew just one seam down the middle or should I cut it in thirds and have two seams down the back? I have the quilt top laid out on the floor on top of the backing fabric and I have enough with 1 inch borders around it. What do you do or how do you do it?

  5. #5
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    There are many ways to do the back. I've pieced down the middle with great results...no issues with stress on the seam. Usually I will add blocks or a section with a contrasting fabric and stretch my backing fabric, which is great if you're a little short. Some people put a seam down both sides of the selvedge, then cut one piece in the middle. This gives a fabric's width in the center and 2 narrow strips on either side.

    I've looked into the diagonal method before and it required more thinking than I wanted to do. ;)

  6. #6
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
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    They say to avoid sewing a seam down the middle. I like to use a center piece with borders for the backing. Or, you can do the 3 panel method with wider in middle & narrow on either side.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    The traditional method is to use two lengths (fabric the length of the quilt). Split one in half lengthwise, then sew a half to each side of the uncut length. This results in the back having two seams. Traditionally a single seam down the middle has been avoided.

    The Flynn method shows how to achieve a similar result with less than 2 lengths of fabric (saves on fabric cost). To be honest, I just can't seem to stay with his explanation long enough to actually use it.

  8. #8
    rb.
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    John Flynn's method is most advantageous for someone quilting on a frame, where you don't want the added bulk of a seam rolling on in the same place, causing a loss of space.

  9. #9
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    Thanks all. You gave me just what I needed.

  10. #10
    Senior Member darlin121's Avatar
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    I like the three panel method myself, but lately I've been piecing the back with alot of smaller leftover pieces from the front. It makes it more interesting, I think.

  11. #11
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    Really good idea!

  12. #12
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by milp04
    Hi Mona, there is a teaching about backings by John Flynn that should be helpful for you.

    http://flynnquilt.com/media/uploads/...onalpb1103.pdf


    Pam M
    I've been thinking of that lately and wondering how I would find the file. Thanks!!!!!

  13. #13
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    This board is just so dang helpful. I dont know what I would do without all of you. You are truly appreciated.

    Mona B

  14. #14
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    I think the diagonal method is a good one but seems too much to do when you don't need to. However, I do not hand quilt so as it was said, that may make it much more worthwhile.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mona202
    Quote Originally Posted by mona202
    Thank you, I will check it out and see if I can do it! Wish me luck.
    I checked it out but it shows more how to figure out how much you need and I was looking more for HOW to do the backing. Do I sew just one seam down the middle or should I cut it in thirds and have two seams down the back? I have the quilt top laid out on the floor on top of the backing fabric and I have enough with 1 inch borders around it. What do you do or how do you do it?
    Hi Mona,

    John's method is how to figure out what fabric you need, and to cut and sew the backing together. It is generally not good to have a seam line directly straight down the middle. The next possible way is to have two seam lines on each side with the middle section being the largest. If the quilt is to be stored part of the year it stays better over time with the diagonal seam.

    Hope this makes sense.

    Pam M

  16. #16
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    It does make sense. I am going to save the link as a favorite for when I need it, and I know I will

  17. #17
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
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    Hi Mona! I don't know John Flynn's method but another idea is to make the backing from several fabrics. It's fun and you end up with another design!! :D:D

  18. #18
    Junior Member mona202's Avatar
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    Then it can be reversible! Sounds like a good plan, thank you

  19. #19
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    boy, i hate piecing backings..
    http://www.allpeoplequilt.com/techni...backs_ss1.html

    i do like to use the leftover fabrics from the front, onto the back,even if it is just the homemade label!

    i also like to use 90 wide muslin,bleached or natural for the backs of bigger quilts..

  20. #20
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    Although I had also been taught to not just have 1 seam down the middle, I have been doing quilts that way for yrs and have never had a problem. Some of these "rules" are outdated so long as you use good quality fabric and batting. Also, I piece my backings horizontally instead of vertically as it takes less fabric.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    The traditional method is to use two lengths (fabric the length of the quilt). Split one in half lengthwise, then sew a half to each side of the uncut length. This results in the back having two seams. Traditionally a single seam down the middle has been avoided.

    The Flynn method shows how to achieve a similar result with less than 2 lengths of fabric (saves on fabric cost). To be honest, I just can't seem to stay with his explanation long enough to actually use it.
    Thanks for your explanation!

  22. #22
    cdufur's Avatar
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    I use the three panel method also.

  23. #23
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    Depending on the size of the quilt- I do my seam across instead of up and down. Buy fabric 2 times the width of the quilt top adding extra fabric for quilting. This methods works if quilt length is shorter than width of fabric 44 +44 =90 ". It ly saves at least 1 yd of fabric. Seam should off center little.

  24. #24
    Junior Member aggie's Avatar
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    I think it's aesthetically attractive to have 3 pieces rather than 2.

  25. #25
    Junior Member QuiltingMia's Avatar
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    I just took a class and we were told to make 1 1" seem but off center it. Press the seem open, not to one side like you do in piecing. This avoids bulk.

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