Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 6 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 58

Thread: Batting scraps

  1. #1
    Senior Member Sarah in Brooklyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    408

    Batting scraps

    I just found myself with a bunch of large batting scraps - this is Warm and White batting. I think I read somewhere that if I sew the pieces together I can use them as a larger piece, but maybe there was ironing involved to seal the seam? Does anyone know what I'm talking about?

    Sarah

  2. #2
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    S. W. Indiana
    Posts
    7,263
    Quote Originally Posted by Sarah in Brooklyn View Post
    I just found myself with a bunch of large batting scraps - this is Warm and White batting. I think I read somewhere that if I sew the pieces together I can use them as a larger piece, but maybe there was ironing involved to seal the seam? Does anyone know what I'm talking about?

    Sarah
    I'd simply whip stitch the pieces together. The quilting you do later will secure the batting enough.
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  3. #3
    Super Member Maggiemay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    1,473
    I piece batting together all f the time. I butt it up against each other & zig zag it on the machine. There is an iron on tape you can use to fuse it together but I've never tried it.

  4. #4
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Suring, Wisconsin
    Posts
    11,042
    I use warm and natural and sew them together. If they are wrinkled, then I iron them. Works good with a big zig zag stitch.

  5. #5
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Grundy Co Illinois
    Posts
    5,214
    I zig-zag mine together ... but also consider saving some pieces in like 9" or 12" squares to practice FMQ on. I'm constantly using up my batting trim that way.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  6. #6
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Small town in Northeast Oregon close to Washington and Idaho
    Posts
    2,667
    Blog Entries
    5
    They make fusible iron on tape so you don't have to sew it together. I've done that way only. It works very well. I've never sewed it together, so I don't know how easy that is. The fusing is pretty darn easy.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  7. #7
    Junior Member Bataplai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Western Washington
    Posts
    274
    I generally use a zig zag stitch, but tonight tried a joining stitch and both work great!

  8. #8
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Albany, Oregon
    Posts
    10,704
    I started out sewing batting together by hand with a whip stitch. (I also overlapped the pieces first and cut them with a wavy line, as instructed in the books.) That was tedious. Then I tried fusing the pieces. That worked okay, but I don't always have fusible available, and it was a pain having to lay the batting out on the ironing board. Now I just sew them together with a zigzag stitch on the sewing machine, and that is easiest and quickest for me. After the quilting is done I can't tell how many pieces of batting are inside, or where they might be joined together. For a comfort quilt I recently used up most of my batting scraps, even some of the smaller pieces. No more wasting batting for me!

  9. #9
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,854
    I save batting scraps and sew a very wide zig zag stitch to joined the butted edges together. It amazing how fast those scraps can add up .

  10. #10
    Super Member Charming's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Perris, CA
    Posts
    1,895
    Yes I just did that today and nothing beats a zigzag stitch to join the pieces together. I bought once two rolls of heat press batting together roll where you butt the two pcs of batting then heat press the roll to join them but I hate it. I feel the batting gets so think and don't like the feel of it. IMHO
    Faten
    Www.easyquiltingcorner.com

    Work like you don't need the money
    Love like you have never been hurt

Page 1 of 6 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.