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Thread: Batting scraps

  1. #26
    Senior Member gail-r's Avatar
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    Some bats are getting very expensive, I can't afford to not use the scraps. I've even put different types together. Never mixed wool bats in but just about everything else. If it looks like it is about the same thickness, together it goes.
    Gail in Utah

  2. #27
    Senior Member w7sue's Avatar
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    I love the idea about using fusible interfacing - so inexpensive - I usually save mine - I write on a piece of paper the kind it is and the size and safety pin it to the batting - no more time wasted measuring pieces that I have already measured several times before - I love being able to use up the pieces - I make scrap quilts so it really makes sense to scrap piece my batting too.

  3. #28
    Super Member northern lass's Avatar
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    I never throw decent pieces of batting away. I butt them up and zig zag them together. Works fine.

  4. #29
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    I sew mine together all the time. I hate to waste anything. I use a wide long zig zag stitch. If they are wrinkled, I just toss them into the dryer for a couple of minutes to fluff.

  5. #30
    Super Member cherrio's Avatar
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    you can zig zag the pcs or use for mini quilts, wall hangings or pot holders. have fun.

    I save the inch size pcs to put in dog beds. I have four and make a dozen a yr at least for the area pet shelters. concrete floors are COLD!!
    You never stand taller than when you stoop to help a child.

  6. #31
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    I've never fused my batts together, but many times have zig-zaged them together or used a very long basting stitch. Our Homemakers club made a quilt for a benefit auction. We used a lot of really small pieces of batting held together with long basting stitches. We tie our quilts, so we thought it needed more ties than most. We put in at least twice as many red yarn ties as normal to hold the batt in place. That quilt brought twice as much money at the auction as our other quilts had been getting.

    I also put ALL the little tiniest fuzzy pieces of batting into a box under my sewing table. About once a year, I stuff that into a pillow ticking that I have sewn from some heavier fabric. I give the pillows to the food pantry. People who need food sometimes need a pillow, too. Our food pantry is happy to have them.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  7. #32
    Senior Member rj.neihart's Avatar
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    I do the same, save those smaller pieces of quilt batting and stitch them lightly together and use them. I usually make a quilt where my 'eyes were bigger than my stomach'.

  8. #33
    Super Member wolph33's Avatar
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    lol I never throw away batting less than 3 in wide.piece it back together for mug rugs,place mats,table runners etc
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/Upnorthcrafter

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maggiemay View Post
    I piece batting together all f the time. I butt it up against each other & zig zag it on the machine. There is an iron on tape you can use to fuse it together but I've never tried it.
    I sew mine together all the time...was told years ago to NEVER iron batting because it compresses the fibers, so don't use the iron on tape, but really don't need it. Just butt them up against each other and zig zag away!!

  10. #35
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    "Heat Press" is the name of the fusible tape. That is the name on the package. I do prefer to use it instead of the zig zag stitch. It is just much easier for me. It doesn't come apart and does not leave a ridge.

  11. #36
    Senior Member Michellesews's Avatar
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    the large zig zag is the way to go. I use the iron on seaming tape on the rare occasion when !!! horrors !!! I end up without enough batting at the end of a quilt and it is on my longarm frame. This only happened once but that tape that you iron on saved me since I did not have to remove it from the frame nor hand stitch the battings together standing at the frame.
    Michelle Guadarrama

  12. #37
    Power Poster solstice3's Avatar
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    I put the pieces side by side and zigzag

  13. #38
    Super Member kydeb's Avatar
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    I overlap them, trim them (with rotary cutter) so they match perfectly, and zig-zag them. Perfectly fine, usable batting!! You can't tell they've been stitched together once they're inside a quilt
    Debbie in Kentucky
    kydeb.wordpress.com

  14. #39
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    I slightly overlap and run a walking foot over it with a very large cross stitch or do a whip stitch by hand.


    Quote Originally Posted by Sarah in Brooklyn View Post
    I just found myself with a bunch of large batting scraps - this is Warm and White batting. I think I read somewhere that if I sew the pieces together I can use them as a larger piece, but maybe there was ironing involved to seal the seam? Does anyone know what I'm talking about?

    Sarah
    Anna Quilts

  15. #40
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    My LA quilter gave me worlds of battng scraps that she didn't want and her customers didn't want. I spent a couple of hours with a ruler and a rotary cutter getting the edges straight (yes, I know some people want the edges curvey) and then I butted the edges and zigzagged them together on my sewing machine. You don't need to press them. No one can tell where the seams are once the project is quilted and you can feel good about how trifty you are. Merry Christmas. froggyintexas
    Quote Originally Posted by Sarah in Brooklyn View Post
    I just found myself with a bunch of large batting scraps - this is Warm and White batting. I think I read somewhere that if I sew the pieces together I can use them as a larger piece, but maybe there was ironing involved to seal the seam? Does anyone know what I'm talking about?

    Sarah

  16. #41
    Junior Member shelrox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarah in Brooklyn View Post
    I just found myself with a bunch of large batting scraps - this is Warm and White batting. I think I read somewhere that if I sew the pieces together I can use them as a larger piece, but maybe there was ironing involved to seal the seam? Does anyone know what I'm talking about?

    Sarah
    I just use a large zig zag stitch and always make sure to use cotton thread for I never know what project it will be going into. I had tried the tape and it was just too much work for me. The stitching is so much easier.

  17. #42
    Super Member rosiewell's Avatar
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    I save my batting scraps and use them to stuff pillows etc. works great!

  18. #43
    Super Member nstitches4u's Avatar
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    I just butt the edges of the pieces of batting against each other and use the zigzag stitch to join them together. Once it is in a quilt and the quilting is done, you will never be able to tell that it wasn't a full-size piece of batting.

  19. #44
    Senior Member LoriMcc's Avatar
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    I also whip stitch, but sometimes zig-zag them together. I use everything!! Have fun!
    Lori McC

  20. #45
    Power Poster ann clare's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GemState View Post
    I buy fusible interfacing by the yard, cut strips 2 or 2 1/2 inches wide and butt the straight sides of the batting together and press the strip on.. It is a good idea to use a press cloth and steam when fusing. I use one of my DHs handkerchiefs for a press cloth.
    Love this idea. Must try it. Thanks for sharing.
    What I make with my hands, I give with my heart.

  21. #46
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    I've been taking the scraps, use the rotary cutter to make sure I have clean edges, then zigzag them together. I've been doing it for years and the batting seems to hold up, especially since you will be quilting over it. I do know they have just come out with a tape that you iron on but the zigzag stitch seems to do the job.

  22. #47
    Senior Member stchenfool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarah in Brooklyn View Post
    I just found myself with a bunch of large batting scraps - this is Warm and White batting. I think I read somewhere that if I sew the pieces together I can use them as a larger piece, but maybe there was ironing involved to seal the seam? Does anyone know what I'm talking about?

    Sarah
    I use a wide zig zag and have also tried batting seam tape which works well too. Just what I'm in the mood to do at the time. Good luck!
    Love 4 stchen

  23. #48
    Super Member callen's Avatar
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    I have used the iron on fusible tape but just using a big zig zag stitch works just as well & NO problems with using this in any quilt that I have made.
    Dance like no one is watching

  24. #49
    Super Member meanmom's Avatar
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    I the FMQ class I took the teacher recommended cutting the batting in a curve shape before sewing it together. Said it would hold together better when it was quilted. If you cut straight it could end up in a spot that didn't get much quiting. She also recommended buying fusible tricot to use as an iron on to piece batting. You can get it in the interfacing section. The stuff they sell to fuse batting together is just a thin strip of fusible tricot. Much cheaper to cut your own strips.

  25. #50
    Senior Member Sarah in Brooklyn's Avatar
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    I just tried the zig zag method and it worked like a charm. Another upside: using up all the little bits of bobbin thread that are left over. I feel so thrifty!

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