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Thread: Batting scraps

  1. #1
    Senior Member Sarah in Brooklyn's Avatar
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    Batting scraps

    I just found myself with a bunch of large batting scraps - this is Warm and White batting. I think I read somewhere that if I sew the pieces together I can use them as a larger piece, but maybe there was ironing involved to seal the seam? Does anyone know what I'm talking about?

    Sarah

  2. #2
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarah in Brooklyn View Post
    I just found myself with a bunch of large batting scraps - this is Warm and White batting. I think I read somewhere that if I sew the pieces together I can use them as a larger piece, but maybe there was ironing involved to seal the seam? Does anyone know what I'm talking about?

    Sarah
    I'd simply whip stitch the pieces together. The quilting you do later will secure the batting enough.
    Bad Spellers of the World
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  3. #3
    Super Member Maggiemay's Avatar
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    I piece batting together all f the time. I butt it up against each other & zig zag it on the machine. There is an iron on tape you can use to fuse it together but I've never tried it.

  4. #4
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    I use warm and natural and sew them together. If they are wrinkled, then I iron them. Works good with a big zig zag stitch.

  5. #5
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    I zig-zag mine together ... but also consider saving some pieces in like 9" or 12" squares to practice FMQ on. I'm constantly using up my batting trim that way.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  6. #6
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    They make fusible iron on tape so you don't have to sew it together. I've done that way only. It works very well. I've never sewed it together, so I don't know how easy that is. The fusing is pretty darn easy.
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  7. #7
    Junior Member Bataplai's Avatar
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    I generally use a zig zag stitch, but tonight tried a joining stitch and both work great!

  8. #8
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I started out sewing batting together by hand with a whip stitch. (I also overlapped the pieces first and cut them with a wavy line, as instructed in the books.) That was tedious. Then I tried fusing the pieces. That worked okay, but I don't always have fusible available, and it was a pain having to lay the batting out on the ironing board. Now I just sew them together with a zigzag stitch on the sewing machine, and that is easiest and quickest for me. After the quilting is done I can't tell how many pieces of batting are inside, or where they might be joined together. For a comfort quilt I recently used up most of my batting scraps, even some of the smaller pieces. No more wasting batting for me!

  9. #9
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I save batting scraps and sew a very wide zig zag stitch to joined the butted edges together. It amazing how fast those scraps can add up .

  10. #10
    Super Member Charming's Avatar
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    Yes I just did that today and nothing beats a zigzag stitch to join the pieces together. I bought once two rolls of heat press batting together roll where you butt the two pcs of batting then heat press the roll to join them but I hate it. I feel the batting gets so think and don't like the feel of it. IMHO
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  11. #11
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    I have joined batting pieces together by using the fusible tape made especially for batting as well as zigzagging on the DSM. Sometimes the joined pieces don't always lay flat. If I am in the mood, I have used the flatlocking feature on my serger....it does a great job of joining the pieces and they lay nice and flat.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Sarah in Brooklyn's Avatar
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    Thanks, all! No wasted batting for me!

  13. #13
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    Ugh, I have so so much leftover batting. I did use leftover pieces once for a practice quilt. I used a zigzag stitch and it worked out fine. What I really need to work on is my patience. It seemed like I spent a lot of time sewing just to get the batting ready.

    Maybe 2013 can be the year I use up old batting pieces as well as quilt from my stash more.

  14. #14
    Super Member HillCountryGal's Avatar
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    I too use leftover batting. Whip stitching is the fastest for me. And once it's all quilted, I can't tell where the seams are.

    Also, the leftovers are good for making stuffed animals, etc.

  15. #15
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I use poly batting and have pieced pieces together to make whole battings. I use a ladder stitch and noone is the wiser.
    Another Phyllis
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  16. #16
    Senior Member GemState's Avatar
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    I buy fusible interfacing by the yard, cut strips 2 or 2 1/2 inches wide and butt the straight sides of the batting together and press the strip on.. It is a good idea to use a press cloth and steam when fusing. I use one of my DHs handkerchiefs for a press cloth.

  17. #17
    Super Member alwayslearning's Avatar
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    I do not bother with the tape, just zig zag stitch.
    "Only those who know enough is enough can ever have enough." Lao Tzu

  18. #18
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    I fuse mine together all the time. I use the roll of stuff that feels like lite weight fabric. Once it's quilted,no one can tell the diff. It's a good way to use up all the batting scraps. I don,t put it on the ironing board,I just touch the iron for a second while the sandwich is on my (protected) table.

  19. #19
    Super Member jgriinke's Avatar
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    I happen to have lots of iron on fusible interfacing. It's a light weight one. I cut it into long strips and use that to bond my pieces together. Works just fine.

  20. #20
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    I bought the tape and I've whip-stitched batt pieces together, but I think I'm the laziest person on the planet. If I butt the edges carefully and pin (or tag-baste) very well along both edges, I can just quilt the pieces in place.

    If you have really small pieces, you can iron it to lightweight fusible interfacing, crazy-quilt style.

  21. #21
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    I just tried the zig zag approach recently after I read a previous thread about it. It has worked wonderfully! I sewed three larger pieces or warm and natural together, and you can't even tell where the seams are! I'm going to work through my batting stash and I think I'll have enough to finish up at least a few more children's blankets before I need to buy more.

  22. #22
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    i too butt the edges together & zigzag them when i need to piece batting scraps- another good use for batting scraps is to cut them into squares & use them for raggy quilt blocks- i always have a stack of 9" & 6" batting scraps- then if i feel like making a raggy quilt i cut fabric (or build blocks) to either 10" or 7" squares , sandwich them, X stitch across the 3 layers, sew them together into rows, then into a quilt top- clip,(shake, shake, shake) wash (shake, shake, shake), dry (shake, shake, shake) -done...
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  23. #23
    Super Member Pat625's Avatar
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    I whipstitch pieces together..Real tiny pieces become stuffing for dog beds or stuffed animals I make...I throw nothing away!

  24. #24
    Super Member 117becca's Avatar
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    I just did an entire lap quilt(50x72) w/ pieced batting - and you can't even tell. I zig-zagged the pieces.
    my name is becca and i'm a quilt-a-holic :-)

  25. #25
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    I do the same thing, zig zag them together. It works. Thenks for the tip if there is a wrinkle, iron it.
    Suzanne
    Asking a seamstress to mend is like asking Picasso to paint your garage.

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