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Thread: Can this equation work? (DIY "fusible" interfacing)

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Can this equation work? (DIY "fusible" interfacing)

    At some point soon, I'd like to try applique. Since I don't know what I'm doing, but love the idea of the fusible interfacing...I'd like to practice with materials I already have on hand. Will this work?

    (Starch + used dryer sheet) + basting spray = fusible interfacing


    ???

  2. #2
    Super Member tesspug's Avatar
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    Try it and find out. What's the worst that can happen? Then let us know. I use the used dryer sheets to polish mirrors and chrome faucets.
    I promise not to buy any more fabric until I see something I really like. Or it's on sale. Or I think it might match something.

  3. #3
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    Only one way to find out. ​Give us an update after you try it.

  4. #4
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    i don't think the starch is a necessary element in your 'equation'...what is the starch step for? use the dryer sheet like an interfacing- where your stitch it around your shape (right sides together) cut a slit in the interfacing & turn your piece right side out- so now the interfacing is on the back & your edges are finished--press nice & flat--spray with your basting spray---stick down on your background & stitch around your piece...where were you planning to add the starch? i don't understand that part???just wondering---maybe i'm missing something important???
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  5. #5
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
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    If you are using glue, why do you need the drier sheet at all?
    Fortune favours the prepared mind
    "Make everything as simple as possible, but not simpler." Albert Einstein

  6. #6
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    You have nothing to lose by trying it. You may even invent a new method of applique!

  7. #7
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    Ok, well, here's something new...
    I didn't figure the used sheet (generic brand, and VERY thin) would hold up very well, so I starched it first (part 1 of the equation). Nice results.
    Cut, sew, turn...
    I go to press the piece flat, and I get this ↓ IT DISINTEGRATED!
    Name:  IMG_20130331_080853.jpg
Views: 247
Size:  205.2 KB

    I did one without the starch, and it seemed to work ok...I guess. It 'stuck' to the test fabric ok (I didn't expect it not to), and I sewed it, so it's fine. Of course, after thinking on it, I guess I wouldn't use the spray ALL the time...probably too expensive of an alternative. I just had an almost empty can of it, so figured I'd try it.
    Last edited by Teeler; 03-31-2013 at 04:21 AM.

  8. #8
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    Oh, and by the way, ironing basting spray negates any sticking power it has. Totally eliminates it.

  9. #9
    Senior Member mermaid's Avatar
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    I really enjoyed making 2 lge applique quilts, but I used the light weight fusible interfacing. Sewed the appliq right side against the fusible side of interfacing--all around. Then cut slit in interfacing and turned right side out. You cannot press the edges at this stage tho--you must place the piece on your quilt block and work the edges with your fingers...then press to the block. It attaches quite well for hand stitching (or machine.) The fusible interfacing is not expensive and, of course, you do not have to follow grain lines, so you get more use from the scraps.

  10. #10
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    I have seen a lot of people use old dryer sheets for applique. I haven't done it yet, but have seen some great results with friends

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