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Thread: Chain sewing

  1. #21
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Two more notes:
    An accurate 1/4 seam allowance is not de riguer in the method I teach. We use the PPM (personal, private measurement aka Mary Ellen Hopkins tip of the day) and trim as stated to the best common size for all blacks. The quilt will end up the size it ends up; or you can add wider borders to create a specific/got-to-have-for-my-(size)-bed/"but-the-book-said...." dimensions. My quilts sort of quit when they get to the size they want to be (see previous topic on this subject from yesterday or day before!).

    There is a lot of minute trimming up in this method. It will help to have your cutting table and pressing surface immediately at hand. Sew as many blocks as you possibly can, then cut the sections apart, then press, then trim.

    Paper piecing is a great way to make log cabins for many people; the end justifies the means, in my opinion. No matter how you do it, just go for it!

    Jan in VA

    For those so kind to toot the horn, thank you for your acknowledgement. If your guild would like to discuss a workshop, I'd be happy to oblige. (Especially if it's someplace warm!)

    Jan in VA
    Jan in VA
    Living in the foothills
    peacefully colors my world.

  2. #22
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    When I did the log cabin, I had to sew each block individually. Tried chain piecing but I kept messing up the order.
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

  3. #23
    Junior Member IraJane's Avatar
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    I haven't read all the responses so this may have been mentioned. I don't cut the length of the strips, but square up as often as I add rows. That sounds like it takes a lot of time, but it doesn't. Sometimes its just cutting a corner that isn't quite square. The other thing I do is cut the strips for the last time around a 1/4 to 1/2" wider. Then when I square up the final block there is a little to work with to make them the same size.

  4. #24
    Junior Member IraJane's Avatar
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    My first quilt was a quilt in the day log cabin when Eleanor Burns published her first book in the late 70's. That was before rotary cutters with the tearing of the strips leaving stretched edges and threads hanging-just makes me so appreciate the tools we have today. I love the method and have done probably lots and lots of variations in width of strips, layouts, etc.... I've done them with very planned colors and very scrappy. As a high school home economics teacher, I had students who wanted to make a baby quilt to keep for their future and had a few students who made large quilts, use the log cabin. When I work with ladies in my extension club to make a quilt we raffle for charities we donate to, we have used the log cabin quilt. Differences in each person's sewing doesn't show up as much, and by adding the last strips wider and squaring up the blocks, the overall look is great.

  5. #25
    Super Member orangeroom's Avatar
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    Something that I've learned, no matter which way you sew the pieces together...if you're making a quilt with a lot of block in it, you need to square the blocks anyways before you sew them all together. Good luck!
    Go forth and sew!

  6. #26
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    Several years ago, I did a quilting weekend w/2 of my DSILs, my cousin and niece. SILs had minimal sewing experience, cousin is an expert seamstress (clothing-never made a quilt) and niece had never turned on a sewing machine. We used Eleanor Burn's book on log cabins. Every quilt turned out great. I had made a number of quilts, but never a log cabin. Mine was a batik.
    "Proud Parent of an American Airman"

  7. #27
    QM
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    Super Member QM's Avatar
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    Thesre days my seams are generally pretty exact, but I still PP my log cabins when I feel a need for greater than usual precision.

  8. #28
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    Thank you JaninVA!

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewincircles View Post
    Thank you JaninVA!
    Ditto!! Wanted to try it, but chickened out in the past (you could have seen the feathers from a 100 ft.)think I can try it now!

  10. #30
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    Jan is absolutely correct! Ask me how I know, I know because I took her class. Have a great day and beware the Ides of March are upon us.

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