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Thread: Curved Seams

  1. #1
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    Curved Seams

    I'm working on a Drunkard's Path quilt block, and trying very hard to do the piecing on my sewing machine. It is challenging, and I wonder if anyone has any tips or tricks to make it easier.

  2. #2
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    Here's a great video - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTOGt4cRdJE

    And another http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8kceRsPGtZ8

    I bought the CurveMaster foot to do an apple core and a drunkard's path but there is such a learning curve to it and I have only played around with the apple core so far. I should have saved my money!
    No one has ever become poor by giving. - Anne Frank
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  3. #3
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    Im doing apple core. I cut small slits every sew often and pin to death. then because its easier for me i hand baste it. then go slowly straighteing it as i go. its my first so im learning! Not easy when your a newbie and visually impaired! But im getting there.

  4. #4
    Senior Member petthefabric's Avatar
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    Place the concave piece on top of the convex piece. Pin at beginning, end and middle. Use an awl/stilletto to keep the fabric edges aligned. Keep moving the left side of the concave piece back to avoid puckers.

  5. #5
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    Wow they made it look so easy. i have friend on here she sews them with no pins or
    anything!

  6. #6
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    It goes easier if you put the convex piece on top of the concave piece and ease in the fullness as you sew.

  7. #7
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I also use the no pin method that is shown in auntpigglylpn's first video. Fabric placement, short stitches, tweezers.
    As in the video, I use a die cutter to cut the pieces. If they are not cut accurately, you will be fighting the pieceing even more. If you don't have access to a die cutter, I would recommend the Marti Michell templates. She has designed the templates for BOTH pieces to be cut using an 'outie' curve. Much easier than trying to get your cutter into that innie. Cut curves using the small 28mm rotary cutter. I know you asked about sewing them, but if they are not cut correctly to start, they won't sew together well.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the video link. It seems that I'm making things harder than they need to be! All of my pieces have been individually drawn and hand cut, one at a time, so no die cutting. I've debated getting the die cutter, but my daughter-in-law suggested that if I'm going to spend that much money, I'd be better off getting a Cricket, that way I can cut more than just material. I probably won't get either. Thank you all for your help.

  9. #9
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    I,too, have the CurveMaster foot and I found that my 1/4 inch with guide foot works better. I pin the end of the block and the center of the block. I don't use more than 2 or 3 pins. Put the fabric under the needle, adjust the fabric and start sewing. Sew slowly,adjusting as you go. When you get to the center of the block,lift the presser foot but keep the needle in the fabric. Put the bulk of the fabric to the back of the needle, lower the presser foot and start sewing slowly again. When you get to the end of the block, make sure the 2 fabrics match and sew off the block. A drunkard's path block is not a block that you sew through at high speed, but, it really isn't that hard to sew. Think of the sense of accomplishment you will feel when you complete one. If you have access to Fons and Porter's Love of Quilting, they have some very good advice for dealing with curves. Like I said, it really isn't hard to sew, you just have to sew slowly and adjust the bulk of the fabric to the back of the block halfway through the block. I enjoy challenges and the feeling of satisfaction I get when I finish the task I have set for myself. Don't give up! I know some people pin the block every 1/4 of an inch to keep the block where they want it, but, I didn't find that I needed to do that. Just sew slowly, adjusting as you go and you will not have any problems. Good Luck!

  10. #10
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    I used the apple core template and found it easier to do it by hand. Of course it was the size of a mug rug.
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

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