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Thread: Getting a quilting pattern from a bound book

  1. #1
    Member quilterbabe's Avatar
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    Getting a quilting pattern from a bound book

    I have a large book of quilting patterns. It is impossible to photo copy the pages because of the binding of the book and I don't want to tear out pages if I don't have to......would like to keep them all together! I have heard there is a way with freezer paper and an iron, that I could get the pattern onto the freezer paper, then adhere my freezer paper to the quilt top, and use it as a guide for quilting. My questions are - 1) has anybody tried this? 2) how hot do you have the iron? 3) which side of the freezer paper do you have against the page of the book with the pattern you are trying to copy?

    If anyone has any great ideas other than this for getting the quilting pattern from the book and into a usable form, I'd sure like to hear them.
    Quilting Leaves Me In Stitches

  2. #2
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    Can you trace the pattern from the book onto tissue paper? Some people pin tissue paper to the quilt and stitch through it. The tissue is easy to pull off after the stitching. If that isn't what you want, trace the pattern onto velum or tissue paper, put it on a light box and retrace it onto freezer paper. Freezer paper will stick to the quilt surface ( shiny side own) if you iron it with a fairly hot iron with no steam.

  3. #3
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    You can take the book to kinkos and have them put a spiral binding on it. It will lay flat then. Make sure it's a spiral and not a comb bind. I have the advantage of owning a large paper cutter and spiral binding system and do this for a lot of my quilting and music books. Down side is since the spine is removed, you can't see the title if the book is shelved.
    Last edited by PaperPrincess; 02-09-2013 at 07:57 AM.
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  4. #4
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    Get the book spiral bound at an office supply store cheap, and everything lies flat. I did it with my manual and large reference books
    Brother XL-3500i, SQ-9050, Dreamweaver XE6200D

  5. #5
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Some have used Glad Press and Seal to trace and stick to the quilt but I heard many say it was hard to get the tiny pieces from the seam after sewing the pattern.
    Got fabric?

  6. #6
    Super Member soccertxi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess View Post
    You can take the book to kinkos and have them put a spiral binding on it. It will lay flat then. Make sure it's a spiral and not a comb bind. I have the advantage of owning a large paper cutter and spiral binding system and do this for a lot of my quilting and music books. Down side is since the spine is removed, you can't see the title if the book is shelved.
    My friend suggested that as they cut the spine, ask to mark the cut edges with a sharpie before they do the spiral. Then you have marked the spine. I was not able to be there when the cut mine. They were busy and had to do it later after I had gone...
    Beth in AZ
    www.bzyqltr.blogspot.com
    Innova 22' with Lightning Stitch and Pantovision
    Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

  7. #7
    Super Member patski's Avatar
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    If you go to staples they will cut the book and bind it with the wire (like some cook books have). I paid $4.00 and it makes is sooooo much easier to copy a pattern.
    Patski
    always learning

  8. #8
    Senior Member Weezy Rider's Avatar
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    Get some tracing paper, trace the pattern in the book. Back the tracing paper with copy paper and you can make photocopies or a master you can keep in a book. You can trace from the copies. Use a sharpie to trace.

    I just use a scanner. If the pattern is symmetrical, I just copy the good section, place it 4 times to make a square and print that. I happen to have the software for photography, so I use it.

  9. #9
    Super Member nhweaver's Avatar
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    Never knew that Kinko's does this. I am going to have this done to my 500 quilting motifs, what a help to have a spiral bound book, and will have kinko's mark the name of the book on the cut spine. (or I will do it first).
    If life gives you lemons, make a margarita.

  10. #10
    Senior Member bunniequilter's Avatar
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    When ever I ran into this problem, I would just break the spine by opening the book and putting pressure on it till the spine released, think a trip to the office supply store is the better option. Thanks for the great idea!
    Quilt outside of the box!

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